Galápagos

Galápagos

by Kurt Vonnegut
4.0 79

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Galápagos 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 79 reviews.
David Wade More than 1 year ago
Galopagas is a wonderful book. The amazing Kurt Vonnegut strikes his style of writing with a little extra pop and tied it together with a bow. This is a must read book. What a wonderful story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this book. It's written differently than anything I have ever read. Once I started it, I couldn't stop. I read it in one evening.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Galapagos is the story of a bunch of mismatched humans stranded on the island of Santa Rosalia in the archipelago of the Galapagos. After they arrive there, the world¿s economy is destroyed after a financial crisis and all women not on this tiny island become infertile causing all of humanity to die out besides those on the island. These few humans mate with each other for thousands of year until eventually becoming seal like animals with flippers after adapting to the island. The narrator of this story is a ghost who was killed while building the same cruise ship that the humans took to the island. He is a veteran of the Vietnam War and tells the story thousands of years later after the evolution. This is an amazing story full of irony and memorable characters. I also praise the plot for being very unique. All in all, this is great read for a science fiction fan, a Kurt Vonnegut fan, or anyone who wants to read
Guest More than 1 year ago
I love that the modern flipper, free loving, fish of a human derived and evolved on an island of the Galapagos(pinnacle of evolutionary thought). The irony and humor of Vonnegut shows more profusely in Galapagos than in most of his other novles. Not my favorite, but nonetheless his veiws of human existence and its role of being nothing in the vastness of time struck me very hard, and I have thought about it constantly since I finished the book a few days ago. It is a book that should be read with an open mind and certain things should be taken in to consideration when reading the first is that this is a Vonnegut novel we are reading, secondly, Vonnegut is an idealist who has had his share of reality and will bluntly say the what everyone has wanted to say, lastly is that he is just really really funny and we should just enjoy his humor.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was never into any kind of futuristic, "walk on the wild side" style of writing until I read Galapagos. Now I love that kind of writing and I can't wait to start my next Vonnegut book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Funny and slightly disturbing.... How easily can a race become extinct... The best book I've read so far from this terribly funny writer.
Anonymous 9 months ago
I liked this book very much when I first read it about thirty years ago and I still like it. It is written in Vonegut's easy going, not quite linear style, which isn't for everyone. But there is a beauty to its simplicity that many writers attempt but few writers can achieve.
chloeschmunk More than 1 year ago
Kurt Vonnegut’s work of Galapagos, published in 1985, is a true criticism of the human race and where we are headed. The story is narrated by Leon Trotsky Trout, who died while working on construction of the ship Bahía de Darwin. The ship is nicknamed the “Nature Cruise of the Century”, and was to set sail from Ecuador, and travel around the Galápagos Islands. However, due to an “economic turndown”, the majority of the cruises original passengers decide not to go. Only a few passengers still plan on going on the trip. The passengers of the Bahía de Darwin become colonists of the island of Santa Rosalia, and eventually become the last of the human race. This same economic turndown was an event that led to devastating consequences for the entire globe. The extinction of the human race as we know it was also preceded by a bacterium that caused women around the world to become infertile. Therefore, there were no new babies born, save for babies born to the fertile colonists on Santa Rosalia. Leon Trout haunts the Bahía de Darwin, and therefore is able to watch the evolution of the colony on Santa Rosalia for a million years. He also recalls memories from his childhood, and of his mother and father. The criticism that his story continues to come back to is that humans used to have brains that were just too big. These big brains led to the human race being incredibly advanced, more than any other species on the planet. However, having big brains also ended up being the demise of the human race. Leon implies that war, money, famine, and heartbreak were all results of overthinking with these big brains. The colonists of Santa Rosalia have smaller brains, therefore war, famine, money and heartbreak aren't issues. Leon narrates the story in a satirical fashion, the way that Vonnegut writes a majority of his books. The story of Galapagos is an eye-opening, satiric, sometimes sarcastic, interest-indulging work. Truly some of Vonnegut's best work, Galapagos is a tale that needed telling. The message it says is, if we don't try and fix the awful issues that the human race is suffering from, then our end is near. The story made me feel a wide variety of emotions. A majority of those emotions were sympathy for the colonists of Santa Rosalia, especially Mary Hepburn. She went through quite a lot, and pushed through it regardless. Hisako Hiroguchi was another character that I felt a lot of sympathy for, seeing as her story was quite a sad one as well. The original colonists of Santa Rosalia were quite random, so it was interesting to read about their various back stories and experiences. The randomness of the colonists also set up an interesting stage for the “new” human race that would come to be. Overall, Galapagos is a satirical evolutionary journey, and is a wonderful criticism of the human race and our many issues
Harold_McFarland More than 1 year ago
Readers of Vonnegut's "Galapagos" will find an adequate supply of angst, his usual stock in trade. Unfortunately, they will find little else of interest. It begins by introducing us to its narrator, an angst-ridden Viet Nam vet who has become a ghost by the time the story opens. The ghost, in turn, describes each of the other characters, only one of them well enough to really care about. All set off on a nature cruise to the Galapagos Islands in 1986, amidst the Latin American Debt Crisis and the initial scourge of the AIDS epidemic. On the way to the Galagapagos, the world effectively ends as a result of a world-wide economic collapse that leaves most to starve and a plague that leaves every survivor sterile . The narrator attributes this disaster, not to stupidity, tribalism, and other primitive traits, but to humans' excessively large brains. The only fertile humans on earth are those on the cruise, including a half-dozen females and two males. Of these, the one most immersing and intensely described character is almost immediately killed off by a heart attack, leaving just one male as a new Adam. The remainder of the book is a rather tedious Book of De-Genesis, as the single surviving male begets (by artificial insemination) future generations of humans and human-like organisms, who eventually become rather seal-like. These creatures, still confined to one island in the Galapagos one million years later, have evolved flipper-like hands, furry streamlined bodies, and, most approved by the narrator, narrow heads with smaller brains. Here endeth the reading. Recommended for would-be seals.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
So I am nomi. And you do not know me. But someday you will. I promise. I am.
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This book is very unique, but not for me. I didn't enjoy this book AT ALL.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
After reading a book by Vonnegut, it automatically becomes my favorite of his. This book is no exception.
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Jimmy Patterson More than 1 year ago
His style is as endearing as ever.
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