Gettysburg

Gettysburg

by Stephen W. Sears
4.3 51

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Gettysburg 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 51 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Let me make this clear upfront: Sears wrote a good book about the battle of Gettysburg, it¿s just that Noah Trudeau¿s ¿Gettysburg, A Testing of Courage¿ is simply better. After reading Sears¿ version, you will come way with a full understanding of the campaign -- the reasons for invading the north, the characters involved, the tactics involved, the aftermath and a detailed order of battle. In Trudeau¿s version, you get all this and more. Both books are easy and captivating reads, but Trudeau¿s version has more detail. For example, in describing the first day of the battle (July 1), Sears provides four maps Trudeau provides thirteen! Other examples are Trudeau¿s description of Iverson¿s failure, the famous 20th Maine and the separation of its Co. B, Biglelow¿s artillery stand at the Trostle farm which are all superior to Sears¿ version. Really, the number of examples are too numerous to list. One area that Sears¿ version is better is the inclusion of more photographs. Finally, Trudeau¿s version provides a closing ¿whatever happened to¿ section. You won¿t go wrong with Sears¿ book, but you¿ll do better with Trudeau¿s.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Sears has written a balanced, single volume account of Gettysburg blending a dry narrative of the facts of the campaign with some thoughtful analysis. I enjoyed the book, but part of my enthusiasm was bolstered by a recent trip to Gettysburg where I viewed the battleground myself. Sears focuses on the high command of each of the opposing armies and the evolution of their decision making throughout the contest. His final analysis finds Robert E. Lee chiefly responsible for the South's failure to win the battle. Indeed, Sears is critical of Lee's decision to invade the North in the first place. As much as I am a Robert E. Lee fan, I have to admit that he did appear to suffer some unexplainable loss of good judgment at precisely the worse time. It was hard for me to stand on Seminary Ridge and stare across the .8 mile sloping battlefield that Lee ordered 13,000 soldiers to cross under enfilading enemy fire. Therefore, I agree with Sears that Lee made some bad decisions, but I do not believe he ordered a charge based on an ego battle with Longstreet. Lee ordered the charge because he thought it would be successful even against odds that his overconfidence allowed him to ignore. In the final analysis, I agree with Lee's decision to invade the North. Lee did not have the option of fighting a defensive war only, like George Washington did against the British. Lee's enemy was much stronger and growing ever stronger by the day. Also, Lee's enemy didn't have to cross an ocean to bring its industrial might to bear. So in the end, Lee had to do something audacious. Unfortunately for him Gettysburg just wasn't it!
Guest More than 1 year ago
An engaging book on the bloodiest battle of the bloodiest war in American history. Sears's quick-paced writing makes for good reading and you'll fly through chapter after chapter before you know it! Buy it know!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very detailed account of battle Gettysburg but it read more like a text book
1_2_Avoid More than 1 year ago
Great read of a pivotal battle and the men who fought it.
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HCENK More than 1 year ago
Having seen the movie, walked the battlefield several times, the detailed account of the players, their backgrounds and the role fate played in many of the events that shaped the outcome my next trip to the battlefield will be much more enjoyable. If you have the patience to wade through the very detailed history of the key players, the explanation of how the battle unfolded is well worth the wait. The inlusion of excerpts from contemporaneous correspondence of soldiers, officers and general staff gives some insights on the influences and state of mind of the decision makers.
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drkrec More than 1 year ago
I took a guided tour of Gettysburg the day I finished the book. It was like I was having my own conversation with the guide. Sears is the Civil War Expert
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A great read on the famous battle. Full of facts and anecdotes and still written in an engaging way so as not to be dry and boring.
glauver More than 1 year ago
I really did not think anything new could be written about the battle of Gettysburg. A few months ago I obtained a copy of Under a Northern Sky by Steven Woodworth and was surprised to find a fresh viewpoint in a compact form. A couple weeks ago I found a copy of Sears’ Gettysburg at a thrift shop. I am impressed by the account he has written. Gettysburg details the campaign from beginning to end. Sears explains both Lee’s decision to invade Pennsylvania and the Union command crisis and then follows the armies into the battle. He details both the horrors of the battle and the decisions of commanders from army to regiment level that contributed to victory and defeat. His chapters on Pickett’s charge are especially vivid, taking you inside the maelstrom. The definitive book on Gettysburg will never be written but both Sears and Woodworth have come close. Many years ago I read Sears’ book Landscape Turned Red about Antietam and thought it was a merely a rehash of Bruce Catton. Maybe I was wrong. I am thinking of revisiting it and reading some of his other Civil War books.
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John60WV More than 1 year ago
Geettysburg was fought from S. He discuses why the Confederated leaders decided to invade the North the decision that affteected the outcome of the campaign and why they were made. Sears discusses every aspect of the battle in vivid prose . TYhe treasder is transported back in time to those eventual days and is left with a greater understanding of that era. I think this is an excellent introduction to those three days in 1863 that decided the fate of a nation.
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