God's Hostage: A True Story of Persecution, Imprisonment, and Perseverance

God's Hostage: A True Story of Persecution, Imprisonment, and Perseverance

by Andrew Brunson, Craig Borlase

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Overview

Andrew Brunson is an American pastor. He holds a PhD in New Testament from the University of Aberdeen, Scotland. Andrew and his wife, Norine, were involved in starting churches, training believers, aiding refugees, and a house of prayer in Turkey for twenty-three years until being falsely accused of terrorism in October 2016. After this, Andrew was held for two years in Turkish prisons. Due to a worldwide prayer movement and significant political pressure from the US government, he was finally sentenced to time served and dramatically released in October 2018.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780801094873
Publisher: Baker Publishing Group
Publication date: 10/15/2019
Pages: 256
Sales rank: 64,403
Product dimensions: 6.20(w) x 9.70(h) x 0.90(d)

About the Author

Andrew Brunson is an American pastor. He holds a PhD in New Testament from the University of Aberdeen, Scotland. Andrew and his wife, Norine, were involved in starting churches, training believers, aiding refugees, and a house of prayer in Turkey for twenty-three years until being falsely accused of terrorism in October 2016. Following this, Andrew was held for two years in Turkish prisons. Due to a worldwide prayer movement and significant political pressure from the US government, he was finally sentenced to time served and dramatically released in October 2018.

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God's Hostage: A True Story of Persecution, Imprisonment, and Perseverance 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
EstherF 3 months ago
A fascinating modern missionary story—very encouraging read! Looking back on my years of homeschooling, it feels like I grew up on missionary stories. We always had one or two each school year (and sometimes a lot more!), alongside the ones Mom read aloud to the family now and then of a quiet evening. This year, I was privileged to read two books co-written by Craig Borlase; this one, and Defying Jihad. Both were impactful, stories I doubt I’ll forget for quite a while. I feel like Brunson’s story is somewhat unique, because you don’t often read about missionaries who are sent to prison—that’s just not a thing that happens, right? But, as we’ve seen in the past with Corrie Ten Boom, or Martin and Gracia Burnham, it does happen now and then. Of course, we hear stories like Brother Yun or Richard Wurmbrand, but those things happen in places remote and unconnected from us…right? Well, as Andrew Brunson found out, it sometimes does happen to us. And he discovered it could be quite challenging! His faith was severely tested in prison, yet through that struggle, he learned he could rely on God—even when he couldn’t feel the Lord’s presence. This book was a great encouragement to me. I hope that if I’m ever in a position like this, I’ll be able to stand strong in my faith and know that no matter what, God is still there working. If you’d like a bit of background for the current Turkish/Syria conflict, I think this would be a very helpful story. It’s also faith-building because even though Brunson was pushed to the depths of depression, and even considered suicide at several points, God came through for him and helped him. Though it could have been told as a story of despair, it isn’t—the hope shines through, even in the darkest places. I loved that. And I’d love to have a copy of my own on the shelf one day! I requested a free review copy of this book, and this is my honest opinion of it.
MaryAnn Bell 5 months ago
In 1993, Andrew Brunson was asked to travel to Turkey, the largest unevangelized country in the world, to serve as a missionary. Though hesitant because of the daunting and dangerous task that lay ahead, Andrew and his wife, Norine, believed this was God's plan for them. What followed was a string of threats and attacks, but also successes in starting new churches in a place where many people had never met a Christian. As their work with refugees from Syria, including Kurds, gained attention and suspicion, Andrew and Norine acknowledged the threat but accepted the risk, determining to stay unless God told them to leave. In 2016, they were arrested. Though the State eventually released Norine, who remained in Turkey, Andrew was imprisoned. Accused of being a spy and being among the plotters of the attempted coup, he became a political pawn whose story soon became known around the world. My Thoughts: This should be a book that every Christian, every missionary should read. It gives us a realistic look at what it is like to "go unto the world" and evangelize. It isn't easy, and pastor Brunson is a classic tale of what it is like in the middle east. This is pastor Brunson's story of how he was captured, the hardships he and his wife encountered. It tells us of their faith throughout this nightmare that they endured. This is an excellent book, one that we all should read.
Sprinkle23 5 months ago
God’s Hostage: A True Story of Persecution, Imprisonment, and Perseverance by Andrew Brunson, with Craig Borlase, is not light reading. The subtitle perfectly relays the contents of this autobiography: persecution, imprisonment, and perseverance. Andrew Brunson underwent intense hardship as he spent 735 days in Turkish prisons. As the majority of this book takes place during his imprisonment, frequently the focus is on his mental, emotional, and spiritual struggles. I appreciated the deep honesty he shared. He tells about his fears, deep depression, suicidal thoughts, the well-intentioned (but not helpful) advice of others, and much more. Although the subject matter in God’s Hostage is weighty, I found the plot fascinating. At times, I wanted to keep turning pages to follow along his journey, but had to stop for the night and space it out to avoid absorbing too much of the emotional turmoil. I could relate to his feelings of being abandoned by God in his hardship. In a way it was refreshing to read about as it reminds me that I’m not the only one who faces certain struggles. God’s Hostage by Andrew Brunson, with Craig Borlase, will appeal both to readers who enjoy autobiographies and to those who followed Andrew Brunson’s imprisonment as it happened. 4.5 Stars! Disclosure of Material Connection: I was provided a copy of this book by the publisher. All opinions in this review are my own.
luvnjesus 7 months ago
What would you do for Jesus? How far would you go to share your faith? Persecution of Christians in on the rise throughout the world, churches are bombed or burned, believers are imprisoned or harassed even to the point that trying to share the gospel is illegal. I finished the book in one day and highly recommend God’s Hostage. “God’s Hostage,” a true story of persecution, imprisonment, and perseverance is a true story of a pastor and his wife serving as missionaries in Turkey. In 1993 Andrew Brunson and his wife moved to Turkey, the largest unevangelized country in the world, through some difficulties and threats they were successful in planting new churches in a place where many people had never met a Christian. They were arrested in 2016, Turkey released Norine, who stayed in the country, Andrew was imprisoned for 735 days. He was discouraged, at times felt that God abandoned him, broken, heart wrenching, but in the end a light in a very dark world. I found it quite upsetting that countries use innocent people for political purposes. At the end of the day, God is in control, He is always with us. He will bring us through the darkest of days. I received a copy of the book from Baker Books in exchange for an honest opinion.
FayJac 7 months ago
I was a little hesitant to read this book, because I don't like books about believer's suffering even though they tend to be uplifting in the end. This book, however, was more about Andrew's suffering emotionally during his imprisonment in Turkey. He agonized over why and how long and what would happen to him which finally yielded to surrender and trust. This is a true story of the persecution and imprisonment of a pastor and missionary in Turkey. He was held for political reasons and trumped up false charges. Many senators along with President Trump and Vice President Mike Pence worked for his release. He was finally released after over two years in Turkish prisons and fake trials that occurred during that time. This turned out to be an interesting book and not that hard to read. As the back cover reads, “God's Hostage is the incredible true story of his imprisonment, his brokenness, his faithfulness . . . and his freedom.” (Please Note: Although a copy of this book was sent to me by Baker Books to review, the opinions expressed are my own.)
Yibbie 8 months ago
I’m really conflicted about this book. I found the first two-thirds or so depressing. But it was also very interesting and in parts encouraging. I was vaguely aware of Pastor Brunson’s story as it was played out in the news, and this book did a very good job of filling in the details. It was impressive learning about a missionary that had spent so many years in a Muslim country. His love for the Lord and the lost is beautiful and challenging. Mostly though, it details his deep inner struggles often without letting us in on his victories. Ultimately I think the problem lies in the editing of the book. It focuses so much on his fear and loneliness that for the majority of the book it excludes all else. It certainly was easy to empathize with him, but I started to wonder what the point of the book was. It’s not till the very end that we learn about his constant daily surrender to the Lord, and only in a sort of flashback do we get a glimpse of how close he grew to the Lord in prison. Then it appears that he and I have some significant doctrinal differences. He appears to believe in direct personal revelation. Several times he pins his hopes on a ‘revelation’ about his release, and when those don’t come true his faith is called into question. The following struggles make up most of the book. Then at the very end after he is released he tries to explain why they didn’t come to pass. In the end, his decision to yield to the Lord, no matter what the cost, is truly inspiring. The way the story was told though made it a book that I didn’t enjoy reading. I received this as a free ARC through NetGalley and Baker Books. No favorable review was required. It was my pleasure to provide my honest opinions.