Howl and Other Poems

Howl and Other Poems

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Howl, and Other Poems 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 23 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Sure, 'Howl' is considered obscene and graphic, but hey: that's what life is. Allen Ginsberg has written the most HUMAN thing my tired eyes have read. People read it and think, 'ugh... this is all about homosexuals and drugs' but the truth is it's about a man who was loved and admired by another, and had finally gone mad. It's Ginsberg's frustration and bitterness that makes it so poignant. I read it before, and thought the same thing: 'it's about homosexuals and drugs' but I was reading beteween the lines: I wasn't digging what he was saying. Wouldn't you be a tad upset if your eccentric, but very close friend went too crazy? Yes you would. So all of you out there reading between the lines, stop whining and READ the poem.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
One of the greatest works I've ever read. Bravo, Ginsberg, bravo. 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Simply one of the best things ever written. :)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good Book
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A great window into the poet that Allen Ginsburg would become. A great addition for fans of modern poets from that era. I would also recommend his book Selected Poems from 1947-1993, as well as books by Jack Kerouac any of his poetry books or novels.
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Pandagirl_303 More than 1 year ago
A great book of poetry by a great poet. I've read it numerous times. You can read it just a little bit at at a time but it is better if you read the whole thing in one sitting. This made a great bus book and I will definenlty read it many times in the future.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
This poem is still ahead of its time--much like the poetry of Walt Whitman. Ginsberg was THE poet of the 'beat' generation and this is one of the most powerful selection of words to ever grace the page. Ugly? You bet. Raw? That too, but it's also brilliant and moving. And prophetic.
Guest More than 1 year ago
So many inflamed cursings and spontaneity's just erupted out of my head after reading this--God forbid they might make good poetry mirroring the experiences of a generation? Does this 'gentlemen' claim to know anything about the Beat Generation, the philosophical impliments that surrounded it...Sounds to me like he's gotten it confused with flow poetry or something. Every poem by Jack Kerouac, Bill Burroughs, Allen Ginsberg, Neil Cassady, and the other spokees of that generation contains not only the sincerest and deepest devotion to self-introspection but a questioning in meaning that is inherently apparent upon reading deeper. It is painfully obvious how far the critiquer of the monumental work 'Howl' or even 'Kaddish' looked under it's skin. If shallow poetry is what he wants I highly recommend he read some of his own. Maybe he was just spitting out random words...
Guest More than 1 year ago
The first time I read this I couldn't sit still. I felt the intensity of the words as the pages flew by. Howl has so much energy every time I read it due in part to the restless style in which it is written. Ginsberg was the quintessential beat poet in his days. While the homosexual and drug -related overtones may be graphic at times, Howl is pure poetry all the way through. Go read Howl!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Ginsberg, like all of the beat poets takes a hard look at society in the sixties and gives us an overview of the mania that it was. To accuse Ginsberg of not knowing poetry's history is a shocking misread. He acknowledges the poets of the past (mainly Blake), but realizes that they cannot fully describe the societal and political climate of their time. Ginsberg is a radical, and he gives a fresh spin to the creative aspect of poetry by using crisp, raw language. A definite must own!