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I Kill the Mockingbird
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I Kill the Mockingbird

4.6 5
by Paul Acampora
 

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When Lucy, Elena, and Michael receive their summer reading list, they are excited to see To Kill A Mockingbird included. But not everyone in their class shares the same enthusiasm. So they hatch a plot to get the entire town talking about the well-known Harper Lee classic. They plan controversial ways to get people to read the book, including re-shelving

Overview

When Lucy, Elena, and Michael receive their summer reading list, they are excited to see To Kill A Mockingbird included. But not everyone in their class shares the same enthusiasm. So they hatch a plot to get the entire town talking about the well-known Harper Lee classic. They plan controversial ways to get people to read the book, including re-shelving copies of the book in bookstores so that people think they are missing and starting a website committed to "destroying the mockingbird." Their efforts are successful when all of the hullabaloo starts to direct more people to the book. But soon, their exploits start to spin out of control and they unwittingly start a mini revolution in the name of books.

I Kill the Mockingbird by Paul Acampora is a middle grade novel perfect for fans of To Kill a Mockingbird and Go Set a Watchman. This title has Common Core connections.

“The banter among the three whip-smart friends would make John Green proud. . . . You won't have to hide any copies of this to create demand.” —The Bulletin

“Fans of Janet Tashjian's The Gospel According to Larry series will enjoy this look at how the power of creativity and the internet can cause a cultural movement. . . . Acampora's novel is for lovers of literature, especially how the classics work in the current moment.” —VOYA

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
03/31/2014
In this quick, witty novel, narrator Lucy and her bibliophile best friends Elena and Michael embark on a campaign of literary rebellion in an attempt to compel fellow students to read To Kill a Mockingbird over the summer. Their plan? Hide copies of Harper Lee’s classic novel in local bookstores and libraries, which will promote a false sense of scarcity and increase demand. “It’s not stealing,” says Lucy in defense of the idea. “It’s shrinkage.” They also orchestrate an accompanying social media campaign, and before long the friends’ brand of “literary terrorism” has grown out of their control. Acampora (Rachel Spinelli Punched Me in the Face) layers the novel with emotional nuance, as Lucy worries about her mother who recently beat cancer, and the friends contend with emerging romantic tension between Lucy and Michael. Strong characters bolster the narrative, including Elena’s outspoken indie bookstore owner Uncle Mort. This strong novel stands on its own as a testament to the power of reverse psychology, but will resonate with fans of the original Mockingbird and maybe inspire a few to check it out. Ages 10–14. (May)
Voya Reviews, April 2014 (Vol. 36, No. 1) - Jennifer M. Miskec
Lucy and her two best friends, Elena and Michael, have just graduated eighth grade. As the three face the summer before high school, they contemplate the tricky changes that are happening all around them—Lucy’s mom’s recent victory over cancer; the death of their beloved English teacher, Fat Bob; and Michael and Lucy’s budding romance—alongside more pragmatic concerns, like their assigned summer reading. As the three friends debate the merits of one of their summer reading options, Harper Lee’s To Kill A Mockingbird, they hatch a plan to honor Fat Bob. The three begin to creatively redistribute every copy of To Kill A Mockingbird in every bookstore within a fifty-mile radius to other sections of the bookstore, like Taxidermy and Car Maintenance, as well as use social media to invent a conspiracy about and drive up interest in Fat Bob’s favorite book. The plan works, though the three friends must finally come clean—they discover that booksellers consider the redistribution of books as shrinkage—but not before people from places far away from their Connecticut town start talking about, reading, and even performing To Kill A Mockingbird. Fans of Janet Tashjian’s The Gospel According to Larry series will enjoy this look at how the power of creativity and the internet can cause a cultural moment, and how even the best laid plans can take on a life of their own. Like authors of books, the three must consider how their ikillamockingbird project means different things to different people. Acampora’s novel is for lovers of literature, especially how the classics work in the current moment. Reviewer: Jennifer M. Miskec; Ages 11 to 15.
Children's Literature - Krisan Murphy
Lucy, the narrator and protagonist, faces the challenge of her mother’s recovery from cancer, her love interest in her best friend (Michael), and the not-so-realistic attempt of causing readers to want to read To Kill a Mockingbird. These three threads keep the plot tense. The opening line of this curious middle grade book is outstanding—”My mother’s wheelchair does not fit through the bathroom door, and I don’t know what to do about it.” Lucy teams with her closest friends, Michael and Elena, to create a plan to influence classmates (and the whole world for that matter) to put down apathy and pick up the best classic of all times, a favorite book of a well-loved former departed teacher. They devise a plan to “misplace” the book in bookstores and libraries, so that it appears they have been stolen. The plan snowballs when they add a website to their scheme. There are a few references to the characters and plot of the book they are trying to honor, but the classic becomes more of a “civil rights” symbol of the freedom to read more than about the book itself. Although this novel is funny, fast-paced, and heart-filled, its premise is entirely unbelievable. Reviewer: Krisan Murphy; Ages 10 to 13.
School Library Journal
04/01/2014
Gr 5–8—The past year had been an emotional one for 13-year-old Lucy: her favorite English teacher collapsed and died next to her in line at the school cafeteria, and her mother almost died from cancer and is slowly recovering. Through it all, Lucy's friends Elena and Michael have stood by her. Now it's time for summer break and the new English teacher hands out a list of required summer reading. Lucy's favorite, To Kill a Mockingbird, is on the list. Lucy wants everyone to read this great book, and hatches a plan with her friends that will "go viral" in a way far beyond what she could imagine. Meanwhile, Lucy tries not to worry about her mother—it's hard for the teen to believe that her mother, who was once told she had only a few weeks to live, is actually well. Lucy's also coming to the realization that Michael may be more than a friend, and wonders if she's ready for all the challenges that high school will bring. Funny, poignant, and quirky, I Kill the Mockingbird will appeal to today's middle schoolers who are tech-savvy, literate, and idealistic. Acampora has developed likable characters that readers will relate to; they will cheer as Lucy, Elena, and Michael work together and amaze even themselves with their courage and conviction.—Kathy Kirchoefer, Henderson County Public Library, NC
Kirkus Reviews
2014-02-19
Literary terrorists hit Connecticut, and things go awry for a trio of well-meaning book addicts. "What if we could make everybody read To Kill a Mockingbird this summer?" Lucy asks her friends Elena and Michael. They've received summer reading lists on the last day of eighth grade, and their favorite, To Kill a Mockingbird, is one of their choices. It's such a great book, though, that everyone should read it, so they go about scheming to make that happen. Operating on the principle of supply and demand, they figure if they make the novel scarce, students will flock to libraries and bookstores in search of it. Naming their conspiracy "I Kill the Mockingbird," they set out to hide copies of the Harper Lee classic, purposely misshelving it in bookstores and libraries in town and, eventually, throughout the state. They create a presence on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Tumblr, and their plot quickly goes out of control, encouraging copycats around the country. Soon, their plan to promote reading begins to seem like censorship, a plot by publishers or a big practical joke. Acampora's tale of three book-loving protagonists out to spread the love celebrates books and readers, and it fizzes in Lucy's lively first-person narration. The spot-on dialogue combines with the irresistible appeal of young teenagers enthusiastically pursuing bad ideas for a fast, page-flipping read. It'll make readers look at reading and activism in a whole new light. (Fiction. 10-14)
From the Publisher

“Fans of the Harper Lee classic--and book nerds everywhere--should flock to this uplifting, unabashed tribute.” —The Horn Book

“The banter among the three whip-smart friends would make John Green proud. . . . You won't have to hide any copies of this to create demand.” —BCCB

“Acampora's well-written, resolutely cheerful offering celebrates books, reading, and life.” —Booklist

“Funny, poignant, and quirky.” —School Library Journal

“Fans of Janet Tashjian's The Gospel According to Larry series will enjoy this look at how the power of creativity and the internet can cause a cultural movement. . . . Acampora's novel is for lovers of literature, especially how the classics work in the current moment.” —VOYA

“Literary terrorists hit Connecticut, but things go awry for a trio of well-meaning book addicts. . . . The spot-on dialogue combines with the irresistible appeal of young teenagers enthusiastically pursuing bad ideas for a fast, page-flipping read.” —Kirkus Reviews

“This strong novel stands on its own as a testament to the power of reverse psychology, but will resonate with fans of the original Mockingbird and maybe inspire a few to check it out.” —Publishers Weekly

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781596437425
Publisher:
Roaring Brook Press
Publication date:
05/20/2014
Pages:
176
Sales rank:
589,266
Product dimensions:
5.60(w) x 8.40(h) x 1.80(d)
Lexile:
640L (what's this?)
Age Range:
10 - 14 Years

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

I Kill the Mockingbird


By Paul Acampora

Holtzbrinck Publishing

Copyright © 2014 Paul Acampora
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-62672-057-2



CHAPTER 1

The Queen of England Is in Our Bathroom


My mother's wheelchair does not fit through the bathroom door, and I don't know what to do about it. I pull the chair back an inch and then roll it into the door frame again. The clunk makes Mom sit up straight. "You have got to be kidding me," she says.

Actually, these are not her exact words. I am not allowed to repeat her exact words.

"Don't worry," says Dad, who stands inside the bathroom, ready to give Mom a hand. "We'll figure something out."

This is the first time my mother has been home from the West Glover Hospital in over a month. They only let her leave because she promised to stay off her feet for at least forty-eight hours. I put my hand on Mom's shoulder. "What if we turn it around and back it in?"

"Lucy," Mom says to me, "width is not a function of vector."

Mom studied math in college. She's a professional photographer now, but she's always finding ways to work things like vectors and differentials and Hilbert curves into conversation. I rarely know what she's talking about.

"We don't have vectors in our math," Elena calls from the kitchen.

"We'll get to them in high school," says Michael, who is in the kitchen, too.

Michael Buskirk and Elena Vallejo are my best friends. They were both on the front lawn waiting to greet Mom when we got back from the hospital. The three of us met back in kindergarten when Elena was a black-haired bulldozer in a pink dress and a leg brace, and Michael was a quiet skinny boy in short pants and Space Invader T-shirts. Now we are all in the eighth grade at St. Brigid's Catholic School, where my dad is our principal.

Elena sighs. "Vectors and high school," she says. "I can't wait."

Elena is certain that high school is going to swallow us up, spit us out, and crush us like bugs. It's because she still looks like a little doll that Santa Claus would leave beneath a Christmas tree. I resemble one of those gawky stuffed giraffes that nobody ever wins at the carnival, but Michael is over six feet tall. He's strong and easygoing with dark hair and brown eyes that match the color of his skin. I think he's the best-looking boy in our school. He lives just across the street from me, so I see him enough to know that I'm right.

"Elena," Dad shouts from the bathroom. "Please stop worrying about high school. It's months away, and it's going to be fine."

"How do you know?" she yells back at him.

"It's one of the things they teach you in principal school," he tells her.

"He's got you there," Michael says to Elena.

"In the meantime," says Mom, "I still really have to pee." A few wisps of thin, brown hair have escaped the paisley scarf wrapped around her head. Dark circles beneath her eyes make it look like she's been punched in the face. Cancer will do that to you.

Dad examines the doorway leading into the bathroom. "We'll get another inch of clearance if I take the door off the frame." At school, I've seen him unclog toilets, mop up vomit, set a broken bone, and rescue a wide variety of rodents, snakes, amphibians, and other classroom pets without even loosening his tie. Popping a door off its hinges is not going to be a problem.

Michael hops off the kitchen counter. "I'll get the toolbox."

"There's a screwdriver in the junk drawer," says Elena.

The two of them know where everything is. They've pretty much grown up in our house, and sometimes we're more like family than friends. I love having Elena as a sister, but lately I'm thinking it might be nice if Michael were a little less brotherly and a little more friendly. That's another door I don't know how to get through.

"How about we just do this?" says Mom. Without waiting for an answer, she places both hands on the wheelchair's armrests and pushes herself into a standing position.

"Whoa!" I say.

Dad quickly reaches an arm around Mom's waist then takes her hand. "May I have this dance?" he asks.

Mom takes a breath. "Lead me to the toilet first."

My parents say it's the everyday moments — folding laundry, washing dishes, pouring each other a cup of coffee — that make their marriage a good one. I know they're right, but I'm hoping for something a little more romantic than a stroll into the bathroom one day.

With Dad's help, Mom takes a small step forward. "Are you okay?" I ask her.

Mom takes another step then places a free hand on the sand dollars and sea fans and junonias that decorate our bathroom wallpaper. "I'm happy to be home."

"And cancer free," says Dad.

She nods. "That too."

A year ago, the doctors explained that Mom's disease — something with a name that sounded like angie-mumbo-jumbo-plastic-lycanthrope — was rare, aggressive, and generally fatal. In other words, she had a roughly zero chance to live. Even I understood that math. A week ago, those same doctors announced that she was cured. "How is that possible?" I asked.

The doctors shrugged. Sometimes, they told Dad and me, it just happens. Afterward, one of Mom's nurses found us in the hospital corridor. "God heard your prayers," she said. "That's how it happened."

It's true that we'd been doing a lot of praying, but until now it didn't seem like anybody was really listening. "I don't know about that," I said.

"God heard you," the nurse said again. "It's a miracle." And then she burst into tears.

Neither Dad nor I backed away. I think it's because we both spend our days in Catholic school. That's where you learn that faithful people can be a little insane sometimes. On the other hand, is it more sensible to accept that everything is random or is it better to believe that God can step in occasionally and repair your T cells? I don't know.

Either way, Mom is on her feet now. She's moving forward with Dad on her arm as if they are about to meet the Queen of England in our bathroom. Mom even offers dainty royal wrist waves as she exits the hallway. This should be funny, but I don't laugh. I suppose this is the result of even more Catholic school stuff filling up my head. We're taught that sometimes the world is a puzzle waiting for us to solve it. Other times it's a mystery to appreciate and accept. Right now I think my family, my friends — maybe even my whole life — are a whole lot of both.

CHAPTER 2

What Would Fat Bob Do?


After a few days, Mom can use the bathroom by herself. After a few weeks, it's clear that she really is getting better. Before I know it, the last day of eighth grade has arrived. Miss Caridas, who is our English teacher today and will be our English teacher again next year at St. Patrick's High School, scratches a list of book titles onto the board. "These are your summer reading choices," she announces.

Miss Caridas recites each title aloud as she writes it down so that the list is revealed in a weird kind of slow motion.

"David Copperfield

"Ender's Game

"Fahrenheit 451

"War Horse

"War of the Worlds

"The Giver."

And finally,

"To ...

"Kill ...

"a ...

"Mock ...

"-ing ...

The class sighs.

"-bird."

I've already read most of these books. Michael has, too. Elena's probably read all of them twice. Her Uncle Mort runs a used bookstore in the center of town, and we've been helping out — and sometimes just hanging out — in the shop for as long as I can remember.

Elena lives with Mort in an apartment above the bookstore because her parents died in a big car crash when she was just a baby. Elena was in the car crash, too. Obviously she survived, but that's why she used to have the leg brace. Except for a very slight limp, which you wouldn't notice if you weren't looking for it, that part of Elena's life is ancient history. According to her, it's a book that nobody wants to read and she doesn't want to open. "But don't you miss having parents?" I asked Elena once.

She just shrugged. "I have Mort," she told me. Mort was her mom's big brother. "He gives me food. He gives me shelter. He gives me love. He gives me all the free books I can read. What part of the parenting thing am I missing?"

Miss Caridas finishes writing. She replaces the marker on the ledge and claps her hands together. "Any questions?"

I have a question: Why do teachers think that shoving summer reading lists down our throats is a good idea?

I turn to St. Brigid whose picture hangs on our classroom wall. She's our school's namesake as well as the patron saint of dairymaids, chicken farmers, and children whose parents are not married. I don't fit into any of St. Brigid's categories, but I mutter a little prayer to her anyway. "Please," I say, "can this school year be over now?"

St. Brigid says nothing. Of course nobody else is speaking, either. Around me, my classmates hardly move. I'm not sure that any of them are even awake.

"People!" our teacher shouts. "Atención!"

Miss Caridas grew up in Puerto Rico, and she pulls out the Spanish whenever she really wants to get our attention. She's been with us for most of the year, but I still think of her as a substitute. Dad hired her after our first teacher, Mr. Robert "Fat Bob" Nowak, died in the line of duty.

Mr. Nowak was as big around as a Volkswagen. He started every day by printing W.W.F.B.D? (WHAT WOULD FAT BOB DO?) in giant letters across the top of the whiteboard. He died in the St. Brigid cafeteria just before Halloween. I was standing beside him on the day it happened. He was paying for his lunch, and the cafeteria lady at the cash register asked, "Do you want fries with that?"

"Fries would be —" Mr. Nowak stopped. He stepped back. He put a hand on his chest. "Good." He took a breath. "Fine." He looked around the cafeteria. "Wonderful."

He sounded almost wistful, which is when I knew something was wrong because St. Brigid's fries are good, but they do not inspire wist.

"Mr. Nowak?" I asked. "Are you okay?"

His face was bright red. His breathing sounded suddenly difficult. For some reason, he turned toward a shelf filled with a whole bunch of pre-wrapped sandwiches. Most of them were egg salad. "Lucy," he said, "I've been teaching for a lot of years, and let me tell you something." He tried to take a deep breath. "You've got to enjoy every sandwich."

"Mr. Nowak," I said, "I don't like eggs."

I wish I had responded with something a little more meaningful, but at least it made him laugh. He leaned against the cafeteria wall. "Don't be afraid, Lucy."

I still didn't understand what was happening. "Afraid of what?"

"Anything. Everything. Be brave." He took a cell phone out of his pocket. "And now I'm going to call 911."

I felt my pulse began to race. "What are you talking about?"

He stared at his phone and then laughed again. "This is going to sound crazy, but I think I forgot the number for 911."

"It's nine —"

Before I finished speaking, a massive heart attack dropped him to the floor. He went down like a boxer on the wrong end of a knock-out punch. "Help!" I shouted. From there, I remember ambulances and stretchers and sirens in our school. None of it mattered. Fat Bob was dead.

Miss Caridas arrived not long after that. She is young and pretty. She graduated from college at the end of last May. Sometimes she doesn't seem much older than us, but she is much stricter than Mr. Nowak ever was. I think she thinks that she has to be. Now she takes a neon-orange yardstick from the ledge and taps it against the board. "You will choose at least four titles from your summer reading list to enjoy once at your leisure, and then you will review them again before ninth grade begins. Each work contains its own symbolic vocabulary that ... blah, blah, blah ..."

I stare at the space above Miss Caridas's head that used to say W.W.F.B.D?

WHAT WOULD FAT BOB DO?

Mr. Nowak definitely would not have served up a long list of summer reading options. "To Kill a Mockingbird is the only book I will assign over your next summer vacation," he told us back in September. "By then you'll be good enough readers to appreciate it."

I remember thinking, I'm already a good reader.

"You might be thinking that you're already a good reader," Mr. Nowak said.

More than a couple of us shifted in our seats.

"It's not enough to know what all the words mean," he continued. "A good reader starts to see what an entire book is trying to say. And then a good reader will have something to say in return. If you're reading well," he told us, "you're having a conversation."

I raised my hand. "A conversation with who?"

"With the characters in the book," said Mr. Nowak. "With the author. With friends and fellow readers. A book connects you to the universe like a cell phone connects you to the Internet." He tapped on the side of his head. "But it only works if your battery's not dead."

That made us laugh. Mr. Nowak liked to make us laugh. He told us stories about his life before he became a teacher. He actually had a short career in the Canadian Football League. After that, he had some success as a professional wrestler. "In the high stakes world of professional wrestling," Mr. Nowak told us, "Fat Bob was six feet eleven inches tall. He weighed four thousand pounds. He was feared on seven continents, and he was a three-time International Smackdown Champion of the Universe. Several nations classified Fat Bob's left hand as a lethal weapon."

"Is any of that true?" we asked him.

"Every word," he promised.

"You don't really weigh four thousand pounds," we told him.

"Catholic school does not require my full fighting weight," he explained.

"You're not six feet eleven inches tall."

He shrugged. "Old age makes you shrink."

When he died he still needed a casket that was as long as a minivan and as big across as two double-wide refrigerators. On the day of the funeral, the huge box rested on a set of broad blue straps stretched across an aluminum frame over an open grave. Father Wrigley, our pastor at St. Brigid's, led us through final prayers. A dark-suited funeral director approached the coffin and stepped on a small lever in the grass. Slowly, Mr. Nowak lowered into the ground. As the box descended, Father Wrigley said, "This day is not just an ending. It is —"

The priest was interrupted by a loud SPROING!

Then there was a SNAP! And a PING! And a WHIRRRRR!

The straps supporting the coffin started to unwind like a fishing line hooked into Moby Dick. Fat Bob, who'd been going down about an inch a minute, accelerated into the pit with all the force that gravity can muster on an almost four-thousand-pound man. In case you're wondering, that's a lot of force.

"Sweet Jesus," said the funeral director.

The casket roared into the ground like a fighter plane crashing out of the sky. The box disappeared from view, but the straps buzzed and whined until a muffled BOOM! brought everything to a halt. There was a cloud of dust. I was dimly aware of shouts and chaos. A woman standing near Father Wrigley stumbled back in a faint.

Our whole class moved forward to stare into the grave. Shiny pieces of metallic blue casket lay scattered below. All four sides of the coffin had burst apart. It looked as if a Lincoln Continental had exploded down there.

"Oh my," said Father Wrigley.

Dad stood as open-mouthed and shocked as the rest of us. Standing in a cemetery beneath a bright blue autumn sky was the last thing my father or I wanted to be doing that day. Nobody but Michael and Elena knew, but my mother had just entered the hospital to start getting filled with cancer drugs and radiation treatments.

Timing, Mom says when she's shooting wedding photos, is everything. Standing over Mr. Nowak's open grave, it struck me that the rule might also apply to funerals. I wouldn't be surprised if it comes up in other situations too.

"Mr. Jordan?" one of the Clooney twins said to my dad. "What should we do?"

My father looked down at our big dead teacher. Dad studied the bent and broken casket. Finally, he turned to the Clooney boy. "What Would Fat Bob Do?"

It wasn't really a question. It was more like a challenge or even a dare. And I knew exactly how to respond.

Don't be afraid! Be brave! Enjoy every sandwich!

But I could not speak. I stared into the grave and said nothing.

Now, the last bell of the school year interrupts my thoughts. Suddenly, my classmates are wide awake. In fact, we are all on our feet and moving toward the door. "Have fun this summer!" Miss Caridas calls after us. "Be safe! Don't forget to read!"

There's excitement and yelling and laughter as we exit the classroom. There is also some mumbling and complaints.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from I Kill the Mockingbird by Paul Acampora. Copyright © 2014 Paul Acampora. Excerpted by permission of Holtzbrinck Publishing.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author

Paul Acampora is an avid reader, an enthusiastic dad, and a ferocious fan of being human. Paul lives in Allentown, Pennsylvania, with his wife and two kids. Paul is a frequent contributor to the Scholastic Storyworks magazine. I Kill the Mockingbird is his third novel for young readers.

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I Kill the Mockingbird 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
This_Kid_Reviews_Books More than 1 year ago
Mr. Acampora’s latest book is titled I KILL THE MOCKINGBIRD (Roaring Brook Press (May 20, 2014)). The book is a middle grade novel about 3 friends and their school’s summer reading list. Harper Lee’s TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD is on the list and was a favorite of the kid’s English teacher who suddenly passed away at the end of the school year. The friends hatch a plan to honor their teacher by getting everyone talking about and wanting to read the classic novel by making copies of the book scarce. As their plan starts to work, the kids realize they started something much bigger than they expected. I really liked Mr. Acampora’s last book, RACHEL SPINELLI PUNCHED ME IN THE FACE, and was anxious to read I KILL THE MOCKINGBIRD. I personally have not read TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD yet, but it is definitely going on my “to be read” list after reading Mr. Acampora's book! The characters in I KILL THE MOCKINGBIRD are very realistic middle school-aged characters and it made them enjoyable to read about. I love all of the humor in the book, and it even made me laugh during the more tense parts because of it. I loved the Christmas pictures scene, Fat Bob, the scene where Michael was reading FAHRENHEIT 451. Overall, the book is a quick read but there is an awesome story packed into those 176 pages!
lovelybookshelf More than 1 year ago
I Kill the Mockingbird is such a clever novel! Best friends Lucy, Elena, and Michael come up with an idea to honor the memory of Mr. Nowak, one of their favorite teachers: They want to get everyone to want to read To Kill a Mockingbird. You know how sometimes demand increases as supply decreases? Well, their campaign feeds upon that effect, and quickly becomes bigger than they ever imagined! A backdrop to the novel is how Lucy and her family are dealing with the aftermath of her mother's cancer scare: "Books carried us away. They'd definitely carried me through this past year." This is handled in a positive but genuine way. I usually make copious notes to myself as I read, but I was so involved in this short little book, and ripped through it so quickly, I made no notes at all! This is a fun, smart read with sweet characters who obviously care about each other deeply, and it is chock full of moments that will resonate with fellow book lovers. I received a copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for my honest review.
TeacherAnn More than 1 year ago
I loved a lot of it, but the main point was also a bit obscure.
Carnitas_Fever More than 1 year ago
Lucy and her two best friends love to read.  As Jr. High comes to a close, their English teacher gives them a reading list for the summer.   One of the books, To Kill a Mockingbird, is on the list.  As Lucy's favorite book, she is afraid that having the book on a required reading  list will destroy any interest for other students. Lucy and her friends begin a campaign to get everyone to read, To Kill a Mockingbird.  Is their plan spiraling out of their control?   Will they be able to contain the anarchy they created, just to get other kids to read a classic book? The story makes a good social statement about "classic" books.  To some, they are classic because they are good.   To others, they are classic because someone else says tells them they are supposed to be good.   Only we can be the judge, but in order to be the judge, you have to read it. This is a trio of great characters, who are supported by a town of other strange and interesting characters.   Now I want to know what they are going to read next summer.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My friend was reading this and it really looks interesting. I will continue to look for it in paperback.