I'm Staying with My Boys: The Heroic Life of Sgt. John Basilone, USMC

I'm Staying with My Boys: The Heroic Life of Sgt. John Basilone, USMC

by Jim Proser, Jerry Cutter
4.7 23

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I'm Staying with My Boys 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 23 reviews.
Dwatts More than 1 year ago
This book is very inspiring and should be read by everyone. Sgt. Basilone's story is riveting and suspenseful. During the course of the story, Proser did a very good job of covering all parts of the story. When Basilone and his men were bunkered down, there were many things going on, and all of those parts were covered at the same time flawlessly. There were times when I felt that the author would go into detail about things I felt weren't very important, such as a random marine's nbackground information. Overall, I liked the book. I like that it is a true story, and the comfort knowing that people like Sgt. Basilone are fighting to keep America safe. Anyone reading this book (or review) should keep in mind that this is a true story and some parts of it are graphic, but making this a story that needs to be told. This book is best for students in Middle School or above.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'm Staying With My Boys tells the true story of John Basilone. It follows his life from his school years to when he was on Iwo Jima. The author uses detail and first person perspective to show Basilone's life. The story is filled with emotion and it was difficult to put down. When he was with the army and marines, it was the only time he was satisfied with what he was doing. Basilone was a great soldier and one of America's heroes.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Couldn't put this book down, author cleverly writes it in first person and Basilone was one of the GREAT heros of our country, long overdue that we finally read the true story of his heroism. Very well done, great facts, much emotion, highly recommended.
greg233 More than 1 year ago
It was strange reading a book about a person you know died in combat and to have it written in the first person. I really wasn't sure how it was going to be but it worked. Being a Marine 52-56 I knew of him before. The changes in time worked. I am not a fan of that because I loose my thought and had to remember where he was. A really good story of the men of that time in our country. I was in the Philippines in 1954-55 and could relate to his being there.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A great read. Further evidence of real American patrism and love of country.
suzsim More than 1 year ago
Gave to my husband for Christmas and he said this is a must read
Anonymous 3 months ago
The beginning of the book takes a little time to follow since the author has it as if John Basilone is talking,but it is worth going through the life of this American hero.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Author and Film Producer Jim Proser has created a richly detailed, raptly written, devastatingly powerful book about the life of American War hero John Basilone. This book is especially pungent at this time in history because it revives a lost tradition of the country's view of maritime heroism. Since the atrocities of the Vietnam mistake to the present harrowing details of a similar (or worse) war in Iraq the concept of war is now very much in a negative light. Even the words 'war hero' seem an oxymoron, so strident are the feelings about America's latest aggressions. But to appreciate this fine book requires a return to the mindset of the US during World War II when not only was Europe under the vile threat of Hitler and Mussolini, but the Japanese warriors were annihilating China, Korea, and ultimately the Philippines in the mission to own the Pacific Ocean. And even in those early years the threat seemed frightening but distant until the Japanese successfully decimate the US Pacific Fleet on December 7, 1941. That incident unified the country, creating a fighting force and support system at home that eventually resulted in the defeat of the massive evil outside the borders of the USA.Given that atmosphere of over a half century ago, author Proser has created one of the most convincing portraits of a military hero in literature. And the intensively researched and detailed approach results in a biography that fully restores the ambience of WW II. John Basilone was a nice Italian boy from Raritan, New Jersey, a lad who quit school to follow his recurring visions. He caddied for Japanese businessmen at a country club, seeing in his prophetic mind that at some day he would be at war with Japan. After trying multiple jobs he finally enlists in the Army, makes the best of boot camp by gambling and boxing, and is shipped to the Philippines where he spent time waiting, boxing (becoming a champion nicknamed Manila John), running a little bar with his Island sweetheart, and finally returning home. Frustrated once again with the boredom of work and the embarrassment of not having finished his education, Basilone finally returns to the military by signing on with the USMC, trains hard at Quantico, Cuba, and other US training camp swamps, and finally is shipped to Guadalcanal where his brilliance and dedication to his commanding officer ('Chesty' Puller) through one of the most devastating battles in the Pacific arena earned him not only the respect of his men, but also the Medal of Honor - the highest commendation offered by his country. Returning home from this mission he rode the waves of adulation from the American people, hobnobs with movies stars, sells War Bonds, and falls in love, only to be shipped out once again to the Pacific where he is killed in action in the battle for Iwo Jima.The amazing (that is, ONE of the amazing) aspect of this book is that Proser has elected to write it in the first person of John Basilone. Everything is told as Basilone perceives it, lives, feels, and survives it. Rarely has a story been written with such clarity and perception: we truly feel that Basilone has written his memoirs. The language of the period is exactly right, the descriptions of the various battles and conditions of being a soldier under tremendously adverse conditions are vivid, and the soldiers' mentality of being in the thick of war are written with such bull¿s-eye focus that no matter what the reader's opinion of War might be, this book makes it all understandable from the point of view of the soldiers who fought. Some of the battle passages are tough to read: 'On October 23, a light tank and infantry attack across the mouth of the Matanikau ran right into the teeth of Vandegrift's defenses. It was chewed up in short order with over 600 [Japanese] killed, many of them trapped in a jungle clearing where US tanks just drove over them instead of wasting ammunition. They ground the poor b.....ds up like sausage under the tank treads
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Must read!!