In the Shadow of the Law

In the Shadow of the Law

by Kermit Roosevelt

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Overview

In the Shadow of the Law by Kermit Roosevelt

A Christian Science Monitor Best Book of the Year
Winner of the Philadelphia Athenaeum Literary Award

In the Shadow of the Law is the story of Morgan Siler, a powerful Washington, D.C., law firm that has transformed itself from a traditional practice serving those most in need into a shrewd giant serving the interests of the wealthy. Through the intertwined stories of a pro bono murder case and a class action lawsuit brought against a large chemical company, we meet the fascinating, engaging, and conflicted characters that make up this world: Mark Clayton, the rookie; Walker Eliot, the prodigy; Katja Phillips, the idealist; and Harold Fineman, the brilliant and burned-out partner, leader of the chemical company's defense team. With a thorny and breathtakingly paced narrative, In the Shadow of the Law marks the arrival of a writer who "stakes a firm claim to the literary territory of Scott Turow" (The Times-Picayune, New Orleans).

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780312425883
Publisher: Picador
Publication date: 06/13/2006
Edition description: First Edition
Pages: 464
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 1.03(d)

About the Author

Kermit Roosevelt is an assistant professor of law at the University of Pennsylvania Law School. Having worked at law firms in New York City, Washington, D.C., and Chicago, Roosevelt is a former clerk to a U.S. Supreme Court justice, a graduate of Yale Law School, and a member of the Human Rights Advisory Board of Harvard's Kennedy School of Government. He lives in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Read an Excerpt

IN THE SHADOW OF THE LAW

A Novel
By KERMIT ROOSEVELT

FARRAR, STRAUS AND GIROUX

Copyright © 2005 Kermit Roosevelt
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0-374-26187-3


Prologue

September 23, 1999 Alanton, Virginia, 6:30 a.m.

Detective Ray Robideaux pulled his cruiser to the curb in front of a small clapboard house. Morning shadows hung long down the empty street. People in this neighborhood tended to sleep in, perhaps because few of them had much to get up early for. Through the quiet air Robideaux could hear the rumble of traffic from a highway overpass. Approaching the house, he flipped open the snap of his holster and glanced at his partner. Bill Campbell's gun was already out, held low at his side. Robideaux tried the doorknob, which turned in his hand, and he knocked. The wood was soft under his knuckles and resounded hollowly. "Police," he called. "We have a warrant to enter this building." By his side Campbell counted seconds off in a whisper. At eight he nodded and Robideaux threw the door open.

The uncertain dawn spilled inside the house, revealing shabby furniture and the faint glow of a television. From the couch a man turned dull eyes on the officers. He wore a sleeveless T-shirt that looked like it had been slept in, and from a quick whiff, Robideaux guessed he'd made a start on the day's drinking. Or, at this hour, that the night wasn't quite over.

"Earl Harper?" he asked. The man grunted an affirmative. "Where's your boy?"

"He ain't here," Harper answered. "What right you got to come bustin' through my door?"

"We have a warrant for the arrest of your son," Robideaux told him. "For the murder of Leslie Anne Clarke. It'll go easier if you cooperate with us, now." He looked up as a woman in a housecoat entered the room. "Mrs. Beth Harper?"

The woman ignored him. "Don't you lie to the police, Earl," she said. "You know what they're here for." Harper shook his head. He lifted a bottle from the floor and took a deliberate pull.

"Ma'am," said Robideaux. "We need to ask your son some questions."

Harper gave a guttural laugh that exploded into a phlegmy cough. "You can ask him all you want. I don't think you'll be getting many answers." His wife's face tightened. She drew the coat closer around her and, as Robideaux watched, jerked her head almost imperceptibly to the side. He followed her gesture down an unlit hall. The door yielded to his touch, and he entered, one hand on the butt of his pistol, squinting into the darkness.

The room was small and cluttered. As Robideaux's eyes adjusted to the gloom, he could see clothes on the floor and clumps of dust that looked long undisturbed. Squalor and solitude, the parents of violence. Unidentified shapes slowly resolved themselves into tattered dolls and children's toys, used and broken beyond repair. For a moment Robideaux wondered if he'd stumbled into the wrong room, but the figure in the bed bulked man-sized. The detective fumbled for a light, found the switch, and flicked it on. The figure sat up, blinking.

"Wayne Harper?" A slow puzzled nod. Robideaux pulled the cuffs from his belt and wrestled the man facedown, pulling his wrists behind his back.

"You hurtin' me," Wayne complained thickly.

"You are under arrest for the murder of Leslie Anne Clark," Robideaux said. "You have the right to remain silent. If you give up that right, anything you say may be used against you. You have the right to an attorney. If you cannot afford one, an attorney will be appointed to defend you at the state's expense. Do you understand these rights as I have read them to you?"

"You hurtin' me," Wayne repeated. "What'd I do to you?"

Robideaux pulled him to a sitting position, let him sag against the wall. Wayne Harper was a big soft man, his cheeks sprouting the tawny stubble of early morning, his close-cropped hair thinning on top. His face was empty of expression, his eyes a pale, vacant blue. Robideaux felt a familiar disappointment. Eighteen years he'd been on the force, working his way up, making his share of arrests. Tracking down the predators. Just once he'd have liked to have them spit at him in defiance, cry out that they would never be taken alive. Or at least resist. Many times, at the end of an investigation, steeped in the crime, he'd hoped for a little resistance at the collar. But no. The drunks on the street resisted, unable to calculate consequences. But no. The drunks on the street resisted, unable to calculate consequences. But the ones he came for with a warrant had time to think it through, to act innocent and surprised. Too many cop shows.

"Do you understand these rights as I have read them to you?" Robideaux repeated.

Campbell stepped into the room, holstering his pistol. "That him, Ray?"

"Seems so."

"Ugly son of a bitch, ain't he? He ask for a lawyer?"

Ray shook his head. On the bed, Wayne Harper frowned, his lips moving. He looked toward the two officers. "A what?" he said.

Mayfield, Texas, 5:30 a.m.

Janette Guzman was getting blisters. The work boots she was wearing had been on sale, but they weren't quite the right size, and they were men's and they pinched her feet in some places and let them slide in others as she patrolled the perimeter of the Hubble factory. She hadn't wanted to be a fencewalker in the first place. It was lonely work, with bad hours and occasional danger, but there weren't a lot of opportunities for a girl with a GED and no job training. There were tech dollars in Austin, there was oil cash in Midland, but none of that was coming her way. At least not yet. Things might be different with a junior college degree or vocational schooling. But that took money, and money in Mayfield was mostly locked into the operations of Hubble Chemical. Which was why she was pacing the grounds of the main factory with a burning sensation growing on the outside of her right heel.

The factory was a gray concrete block, featureless but for infrequent windows. It was the tallest structure in Mayfield, save the water tower, but wide enough to look squat. In the daylight it seemed to have dropped from the sky, flattening on impact. Now it was just a dark bulk looming in Janette's peripheral vision. Her flashlight's beam played across the fence, up to the razor wire, down to the hard-baked dust. Some feet beyond, an incurious armadillo trundled by. She took a deep breath of the cold night air, looking up to the vastness of the spangled sky, then raised the radio to her lips. "West four," she said. "All clear." Then she bent down to pull on her sock, and that was how she missed the first shy flames showing through the factory windows. She saw what followed, though.

With a deep roar, a blast swelled up through the building. The windows burst in a glistening rain of glass, and thick black smoke followed. For a few moments Janette watched, stunned, as backlit figures struggled from the plant, turned strange pirouettes, dropped to the ground. "Marty," she said into the radio. "Something's happened. There's been an explosion. There's a fire."

The reply crackled back. "What? Say again."

"You'd better send someone. There's a big fire. There are people running out of the plant." She paused, watching the figures against the glow. Another explosion shook the building. "They're dancing. I don't know. They're falling down. They're sort of twitching." She stumbled and realized that she had backed up into the fence, its chain links pressing against her body. The firelight dimmed, obscured by smoke, then reasserted itself. She turned and through the fence saw jackrabbits bounding away, the armadillo lumbering awkwardly, its scales a fading gleam. A thought flashed irrelevantly through her mind, a rhyme learned from a library book: Something wicked this way comes. "Marty, the gate's locked."

"What?"

Janette tugged the handle. "This gate's locked. I can't get out." The radio made no reply, and she let it fall to the ground, taking hold of the fence, pulling herself up. Her boots scraped uselessly against the metal, too large to find a foothold, and she gave a high cry of frustration as she dropped like a supplicant to her knees, fingers meshed with the unyielding wire. She caught her breath and looked back at the factory, watching the roiling smoke, black against the fire, blacker than the black sky. A chemical scent laced the air now, stinging her eyes, burning her throat. She fumbled for the radio. "Marty, this smoke is poisonous. I can't ... Tell ... Oh, God, I don't know ... Tell ..."

(Continues...)



Excerpted from IN THE SHADOW OF THE LAW by KERMIT ROOSEVELT Copyright © 2005 by Kermit Roosevelt. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
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Reading Group Guide

About this Guide
The following author biography and list of questions about In the Shadow of the Law are intended as resources to aid individual readers and book groups who would like to learn more about the author and this book. We hope that this guide will provide you a starting place for discussion, and suggest a variety of perspectives from which you might approach In the Shadow of the Law.

About the Book
Morgan Siler is one of Washington, D.C.'s most powerful K Street law firms, its roster of clients stocked with multibillion-dollar corporations. Through the obsessive efforts of its founder's son, Peter Morgan, his father's old-fashioned business has been transformed into a veritable goliath, embracing bankruptcy and merger divisions that Archibald Morgan had deemed ungentlemanly. As Peter reaches the pinnacle of his career, his firm is embroiled in two difficult cases: a pro bono death-penalty case in Virginia, and a class-action lawsuit brought against Hubble Chemical Corporation after an on-site explosion killed dozens of workers.

Assigned to these cases is a group of young associates and seasoned partners struggling to make their way in the firm. Mark Clayton, fresh out of law school, is beginning to loathe his dull workload, and to be frightened by the downgrading of his personal life, when he is assigned to the pro bono case. Assisting him is the mercurial Walker Eliot, a brilliant third-year associate whose passion for the law is as great as his skill at unraveling its intricacies. The aggressive, profane, and wildly successful litigator Harold Fineman is leading the Hubble defense, assisted by first-year Katja Phillips, whose twin devotion to productivity and idealism intrigue him, and Ryan Grady, another first-year, whose quest to pick up girls is starting to interfere with his work.

In this complex, ambitious, and gripping first novel, Kermit Roosevelt vividly illustrates the subtle and stark effects of the law on the lives not only of a group of lawyers, but also on communities and private citizens. In the Shadow of the Law is a meditation about the life of the law, the organism that is a law firm, and its impact on those who come within its powerful orbit.

About the Author
Kermit Roosevelt is an assistant professor of law at the University of Pennsylvania Law School. Having worked at law firms in New York City, Washington, D.C., and Chicago, Roosevelt is a former clerk to a U.S. Supreme Court justice, a graduate of Yale Law School, and a member of the Human Rights Advisory Board of Harvard's Kennedy School of Government. He lives in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

1. Why do you think Kermit Roosevelt ends each part of the prologue with outside characters' approach to the law?

2. The tone of each characters' introduction is one of examination. Why do you believe the author chooses to being their stories this way?

3. What role does the history of the Morgan Siler firm play in the lives of the lawyers who now work for the company? Is the transformation of the firm representative of other changes?

4. The question of capital-C character: Aside from narrative action, how do characters reveal their true "characters"? Consider their physical, material worlds, the way they speak to others, the way they regard their personal histories, etc.

5. The "shadow" of the title implies critique, yet paradoxically, the responsibility that comes with the law's practice and interpretation. Is the book about interpretation in its many forms?

6. Discuss the author's choice to create/include court documents.

7. Katja writes on page 129, "What's the matter with law?" How and why is her question genuine?

8. Harold Fineman says, "Act and it will produce belief. That's what litigation is all about." Do you agree with this statement? How might it be altered or elaborated upon?

9. How is the firm Morgan Siler like a character?

10. Think about the characters: Mark, Katja, Harold, Walker, etc. What toll does their profession take on them? How might they be rewarded or revitalized by the practice of law?

11. What are your thoughts on the outcomes of the two cases?

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In the Shadow of the Law 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
MichaelTheAuthorMG More than 1 year ago
Kermit Roosevelt's book gives the lie to the Lord Chancellor's boast in Gilbert and Sullivan's Iolanthe: 'The law is the true embodiment/Of everything that's excellent./ It has no kind of fault or flaw,/And I, my lords, embody the law.' This work makes a memorable case for legal ethics and ethical lawyers, and it decries the 'live to work' ethic that characterizes too many law firms, hospitals, banks and brokerage houses. Young lawyers try to compartmentalize their life, but the all-encompassing firm increasingly provdes everything they would otherwise be obliged to go outside for, including some goods and services available online: lunch, dry cleaning, shoe shining, coiffure, babysitting, nursing care and even retirement community placement for an ailing parent -- all in the name of maximizing hours billable to clients. Mr. Roosevelt's book, as one would expect from an author of his distinguished name, is tasteful, eschewing lurid or graphic sex scenes in favor of subtle reminders that lawyers participate in human sexuality. The work carefully distinguishes between law and justice, and should be read by all university students who are considering a career in the law.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I found this book most interesting because of its perspective and insight on law. Clearly not a legal thriller but rather a condemnation of our system as it has evolved. Although the subject matter is intense and convoluted, this is a fairly easy read for someone unfamiliar with law.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I found this book to be intelligently written and aspects of it very interesting. The author is a born teacher but apparently not a born storyteller. His explanations of the law, its manipulations and sometimes its machinations are well explained (for people who are not familiar with the law). This is the part I enjoyed the most.However it is definitely not a legal thriller. There is nothing thrilling or even suspenseful about the story. The plot has potential but the characters are thin, boring, juvenile-even downright silly in one case. Regarding the 'inevitable comparison to Scott Turow' as stated by one reviewer, I say, 'no contest'. Turow wins as a thriller writer but Roosevelt explains the law better.However, I was expecting a 'legal thriller' and was disappointed in that regard.