Indigo Slam (Elvis Cole and Joe Pike Series #7)

Indigo Slam (Elvis Cole and Joe Pike Series #7)

by Robert Crais
4.2 26

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Indigo Slam 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 27 reviews.
Lance_Charnes More than 1 year ago
If you've been following along with the ongoing Elvis Cole saga, you know exactly how these stories go: Elvis gets hired by someone (usually female) with a sob story, he pokes around while employing his signature wise-assery, finds that All Is Not What It Seems, gets beaten up, brings in his Terminator-like bestie Joe Pike, shoots the hell out of the bad guys, fails to get paid, then pops a cold one on the balcony of his Hollywood Hills A-frame. Did I leave out anything? Good. This one is little different, except this time the female client is 15 and a surrogate mother to two younger moppets. Their ne'er-do-well father went off on business and didn't come home; can Elvis Cole find him? Of course he can...and he also finds the gangsters of various ethnicities who are also after the hapless, wayward dad for a variety of reasons. Kidnappings, gunfights, and threats to Cole's bodily and emotional health ensue. Cole is an engaging character, and author Crais knows his insides and outsides well by now. His voice is solidly established and consistent throughout. We see the world through his eyes, and luckily Cole can describe a scene well enough for us to picture it easily. Cole has always been a soft touch, and here he gets to ponder the imponderabilities of children in between deadly threats to his life. The prose flows smoothly and quickly. Crais has a knack for creating vivid secondary characters, which is a vital skill when the main protagonists remain the same through the series. Teri, the client, is a pretty convincing high-functioning mid-teen, and her younger brother is an equally convincing brat. So why the semi-meh rating? If you've ridden with Cole before, nothing happens here that will surprise you much. A good deal of the dialog veers into banter. Cole's wiseass act wears with repetition. He constantly stumbles into situations that call for him to be tied to chairs and beaten by goons, yet he never seems to develop radar for that sort of thing, only one of several indicators of a lack of growth or development. And I'm seriously over Joe Pike as both a character and a type; as the lead's obligatory stone-killer sidekick, he's yet another version of Spenser's Hawk and Easy Rawlins' Mouse, yet with less charisma, and has come to mostly relieve Cole of having to detect his way out of trouble rather than shooting his way out. This is the seventh Elvis Cole novel and the sixth I've read (I somehow missed Sunset Express). I remember liking the first couple pretty well, and the next couple well enough, but at this point I'm undecided whether I want to sign up for more. Cole's still good enough company, but the formula has become so well-established that I can call the twists and beats well before they happen. (I get to this point sooner or later with most series, so this isn't unique to Crais.) Other than gaining a steady girlfriend, I can't think of a way that Cole has changed or grown much since his debut in The Monkey's Raincoat. If you haven't encountered Elvis Cole before and happen to run across this on the airline seat next to you, it's as good an introduction as any. If you're a rabid Cole fan and can't wait to see if Pike finally removes his sunglasses, go ahead and read this. But if you're like me -- on the bubble about this series, hoping the next one will do something different -- you're not going to find "new" in Indigo Slam. 
whalesong More than 1 year ago
Robert Crais can do no wrong in my eyes. I love Elvis Cole. 
souternlady More than 1 year ago
Love Robert Crais! I'm always excited when his new release comes out and this one didn't disappoint. The title was so catchy and couldn't wait to find out how it could have been chosen. He is a talented writer, keeps the story moving, exciting and interesting. Enjoyed this book very much.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was very intense, i read this book because my mom is a Crais fan and i didn't have anything to read. It was very good once i got into the thick plot. Very, Very thrilling
Carstairs38 More than 1 year ago
Tracking a Wayward Father It never fails for the poor, unsuspecting PI. They think they are taking on an easy case when in reality what appears simple holds danger and twists. Of course, if it didn’t, we’d just have a short story instead of a novel. But it’s the case once again for Elvis Cole in Indigo Slam. This book finds Elvis working for a trio of kids. They walk into his office one afternoon and hire him to find their father. The man has been missing for almost two weeks. While he’s left them behind before while pursuing a new job, this is the longest he’s ever been gone, and the trio have gotten worried. Elvis isn’t sure about working for them, especially since the oldest is fifteen and still too young to be caring for her siblings, but Elvis’s girlfriend Lucy talks him into it. The trail quickly leads him from Los Angeles to Seattle, where Elvis realizes that the family was in witness protection three years ago. Does their past have anything to do with the father’s disappearance? Could Elvis stir up old danger by his investigation? Of course, the answer to all of those questions is yes, but I will leave it to you to figure out exactly what is happening now and why. There are some good twists and lots of complications along the way to an exciting climax. The pace never lags along the way, either. There are very few returning characters in this book, but the new cast of characters are interesting enough to keep your attention. I do still feel that Elvis and especially his partner Joe Pike are more caricatures instead of full and real characters, but that feeling is lessening as the series progresses. The previous book left us with a couple of very mild cliffhangers. Lucy had just gotten a potential job offer that would move her to LA, and this book picks up on that, giving us a fun sub-plot as Elvis deals with the case. I’m very curious where this will go in future books. On the other hand, the ending of the previous book left Elvis very disillusioned and thinking of getting out of the PI business. There is no mention of any of that here, which I found very disappointing, especially since it could have fueled some nice character growth. I have often complained in my reviews of Robert Crais’s books about his excessive foul language. I’m happy to say that wasn’t as issue for me here. Oh, don’t get me wrong, there was still foul language, but it fit the characters and the situations instead of feeling like he added it to pad his word count. This isn’t one of my normal cozies, but I wasn’t expecting it to be when I picked it up. This is the second time I’ve listened to David Stuart narrate one of these books, and I found that he did an excellent job. In fact, I’d gotten used to his narration at this point, so his take on Elvis and Joe didn’t feel off like it had when I first started the last book. I’m seeing some good growth in the writing as this series progresses, and I’m beginning to see why it is such a favorite series. I’m hoping that upward trend continues from Indigo Slam.
1dachsmom More than 1 year ago
Another great Robert Crais book. Don't miss this one. Highly Recommend!
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