Insight Pitch: My Life as a Major League Closer

Insight Pitch: My Life as a Major League Closer

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781683581758
Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing
Publication date: 03/06/2018
Pages: 248
Sales rank: 545,605
Product dimensions: 5.70(w) x 8.60(h) x 1.20(d)

About the Author

Skip Lockwood enjoyed a professional baseball career from 1965 to 1980, most of which time he spent pitching for the Milwaukee Brewers (1970-73) and the New York Mets (1975-79). Pursuing his longtime interest in game-day visualization and mental preparations, he proceeded to earn a master's degree from Fairfield University and another master's in science from MIT as a Sloan Fellow. In the following years, he continued to study and practice in the field of sport psychology. Today, he makes frequent appearances and delights audiences with humorous behind-the-scenes baseball stories and inspirational messages of how elite athletes excel despite unyielding pressure.

Fergie Jenkins is a former Major League Baseball pitcher who had over 3,000 strikeouts over the course of his career. A three-time All-Star and the 1971 National League Cy Young Award winner, Jenkins was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1991.

Table of Contents

Prelude ix

Foreword xiii

Introduction xv

Chapter 1 Little League Tryouts 1

Chapter 2 New York Mets Rubber Game, September 28, 1975 16

Chapter 3 The Disabled List, July 1952 28

Chapter 4 Welcome to Shea Stadium, 1975 34

Chapter 5 Longball: Polo Grounds, 1962 68

Chapter 6 Moneyball, 1964 77

Chapter 7 An Unwelcoming Welcome to the Show 91

Chapter 8 The Boonies: Burlington, Iowa, 1964 106

Chapter 9 Running on Empty: Bradenton, Florida, 1965 117

Chapter 10 Kansas City Here I Come, 1965 126

Chapter 11 1966 Changeups 140

Chapter 12 Pitching In 149

Chapter 13 Strike One … Players' Strike, 1972 164

Chapter 14 Moving On 176

Chapter 15 New York, New York, 1975 193

Chapter 16 The Last Hurrah 212

Epilogue: Fenway Park's Centennial Celebration and Player Reunion, 2012 217

Index 227

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Insight Pitch: My Life as a Major League Closer 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous 12 months ago
Great journey for a resilient player!
MinTwinsNY More than 1 year ago
Claude “Skip” Lockwood was a major league pitcher who was on six different teams over a 12 year career. He wasn’t a star player on any of them, never won any awards or all-star appearances or had an extraordinary game that will be seen forever on videos. However, what he did collect during his career was many humorous and interesting stories. He shares them in this very entertaining and fast paced memoir, “Insight Pitch.” Lockwood was originally signed by the Kansas City Athletics as a 17 year old “bonus baby” infielder and it is this signing where he shares one of his many humorous stories. When the A’s sent a team executive named Pat Friday to the Lockwood residence to sign Skip, the negotiations went fine with Skip and his father, but when the moment came for the final decision to sign, Dad left the room, leaving Skip and Friday alone. Skip took a pen and made two changes to the contract. One was to correct the name on the contract to his given name, “Claude Edward Lockwood, Jr.” Then came this gem: “Then I said ‘There’s just one more thing right here,’ pointing to the space where the number $35,000 had been written. I put an oversized ‘1’ in front of it.” Then Friday calls owner Charlie Finley, who asks Skip why he should pay him that kind of money – the answer was “Because I’ll make you a winner.” The phone is given back to Friday, Finley agrees to the new amount and Lockwood becomes a bonus baby. This story was one the best of many great ones in the book, mainly because of the guts it took for a 17 year old kid to do that in the days of the reserve clause and no major league draft. Lockwood shares the same type of stories through his transformation from an infelider to a pitcher in the minors, then from a struggling starting pitcher for the Milwaukee Brewers to a more successful relief pitcher for the New York Mets. The best of these was the prank that Mets clubhouse manager Herbie Norman played on Lockwood on his first day as a Met. Immediately upon arrival at Shea Stadium, Norman hurries Lockwood out to the bullpen, as he keeps saying how the team needs Skip to be ready to pitch right away. Norman leads him to the bullpen, where Lockwood greets each man personally and tells them how he is excited to be on the team. Problem was that this was the VISITING bullpen and each man he spoke to was a member of the Montreal Expos. These are just two of the many examples of the captivating and funny stories that Lockwood shares and makes the book one that any baseball fan will enjoy, whether or not he or she has ever heard of Lockwood without having to look up his statistics on Baseball Reference. This page-turner is one of the best sports memoirs I have read. I wish to thank Sports Publishing for providing a copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.