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Isabella: Girl in Charge
     

Isabella: Girl in Charge

by Jennifer Fosberry, Mike Litwin (Illustrator)
 

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Plucky, purple-haired Isabella, star of the New York Times bestselling picture book series, is back for another adventure!

Just how high can a little girl dream?

A big event has Isabella ready to go at the crack of dawn. But that's a motion her parents are not likely to pass. After a two-to-one vote, it's decided that some

Overview

Plucky, purple-haired Isabella, star of the New York Times bestselling picture book series, is back for another adventure!

Just how high can a little girl dream?

A big event has Isabella ready to go at the crack of dawn. But that's a motion her parents are not likely to pass. After a two-to-one vote, it's decided that some things need to happen first-like eating breakfast and brushing her teeth!

If her family is going to work like a democracy, Isabella knows what she has to do; call an assembly and campaign her way out the door

Taking inspiration from the women who trail blazed their way onto the political map of America, Isabella celebrates the women who were first to hold their offices. And if Isabella can get her parents out the door, she might just witness the first woman voted into the highest position of all...

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
10/24/2016
The heroine of My Name Is Not Isabella highlights pioneering women in American politics. Once again, Isabella changes her name throughout, instructing her parents to call her Susanna (after Susanna Madora Salter, the first woman mayor), Jeannette (referring to congresswoman Jeannette Rankin), and Sandra (as in Day O’Connor), among other names. The personas let Litwin do some time traveling in his soft-textured digital illustrations as he pictures the purple-haired heroine inhabiting each role; the story concludes with Isabella witnessing the inauguration of a brown-skinned female president. Biographical background about each politico and a timeline of other female firsts round out a light introduction to women’s role in U.S. political history. Ages 4–8. Illustrator’s agent: Gwen Walters. (Oct.)
From the Publisher
"With a spunky female heroine as the star, it's no wonder Fosberry's "Isabella" series is so popular...a boisterous girl-power book for the ages." - Lee Littlewood, Creators Syndicate

"There's lots of fun wordplay ("Let's vote on breakfast." "Capital idea!") and cheerful artwork throughout this delightful, empowering picture book, ending with a time line and bios for each of these amazing women.
" - Good Reads with Ronna

"The heroine of My Name Is Not Isabella highlights pioneering women in American politics... Biographical background about each politico and a timeline of other female firsts round out a light introduction to women's role in U.S. political history. " - Publishers Weekly

"I think this book is a fantastic way to introduce kids, boys and girls alike, to some women who have shaped US history through their role in politics. I like the extended biographies at the end of the book, since many of these women were new names to me as well." - Growing My Kids Reviews

"I have read other books in the Isabella series, and I love how she imagines herself to be lots of different characters and even real people. It is interesting to learn about the many different ways a girl could grow up to be a leader. - Susan Faith, Age 8" - Kids Book Buzz

"Spending some part of your day teaching whomever you're reading this to about great women in the past, is super fun. The book brings out a great amount if discussion and can even become a fun history project for little ones.
" - Cassandra M's Place

"Fossberry's spunky spokeswoman for women knows her stuff, and she gives Isabella's mother some clever puns on the accomplishments of these historic women.
" - Books For Kids

"This books help shine a spotlight on history making female politicians. I love that is shows examples of real life women politicians in a fun way but also has a detailed timeline of the actual history of women in politics at the end.
" - Crafty Mama

"If you're looking for a gift to inspire the future female leader in your life, consider... Isabella: Girl in Charge...The illustrations fit the story well, and the book itself provides a great way to incorporate mini history lessons and to encourage girls to dream big. " - Motherhood Moment

Kirkus Review
2016-08-02
Isabella knows her women’s history.The little white girl cannot contain her excitement for the day she’s planned with her parents. “It’s not time, Isabella,” says her groggy mother at 6:00 a.m. “My name is not Isabella…I am SUSANNA, mayor of this here town,” she responds, and an accompanying picture shows her in a dress with a sash reading “FIRST FEMALE MAYOR” across her chest. This establishes a pattern, with Isabella proclaiming herself Jeanette (“FIRST FEMALE IN CONGRESS”), Nellie (“FIRST FEMALE GOVERNOR”), Frances (“FIRST FEMALE CABINET MEMBER”), and Sandra (“FIRST FEMALE JUSTICE [on the] SUPREME COURT”) while they prepare for their outing. The final spread shows them in a crowd at the U.S. capital watching the swearing-in of “MADAME PRESIDENT." The depiction of a woman of color as the fictional presidential character seems self-conscious, and her presence underscores the whiteness of the historical figures depicted earlier. A backmatter timeline under informational text about the white-women firsts does include diverse women’s accomplishments, but it also simplistically highlights the 19th Amendment with the phrase: “women get the right to vote,” erasing the experiences of systematically disenfranchised African-American and Native women. Litwin’s blueline pencil and Photoshop illustrations include such stylistic tics as purple hair for both Isabella and her mother and frequent, gaping grins, detracting from the book as a whole. A well-meaning but uneven offering. (Picture book. 5-8)
School Library Journal
04/01/2017
PreS-Gr 2—In this latest series installment, Isabella, the purple-haired girl with the big imagination, is eager to begin another adventure. She enthusiastically wakes her mother at six o'clock in the morning, cheering, "I'm ready! Let's go!" This time, Isabella is ready to hit the campaign trail, imagining herself as several groundbreaking female American politicians. First, she is Susanna Salter, the first elected female U.S. mayor. Then, she becomes Jeannette Rankin, the first woman elected to Congress. Next, she's Nellie Tayloe Ross, the country's first female governor, and on to Frances Perkins, the first female cabinet member. Lastly, she becomes Sandra Day O'Connor, the first female Supreme Court justice. As Isabella morphs into each of these women, she and her family pack up their hotel room, eat breakfast, and walk to their destination: the presidential inauguration of an unidentified African American woman. Mike Litwin's colorful mixed-media illustrations complement Isabella's vibrant personality, and viewers will love watching Isabella take on every new identity. Cris Dukehart's expressive narration echoes Isabella's fun personality, and upbeat instrumental background music rounds out the production. A detailed bonus feature titled "It's Time: A Time Line of Women in U.S. Politics" highlights additional trailblazing women and their achievements. While the female politicians Isabella introduces will be new to many viewers, their accomplishments should not be forgotten. VERDICT Use this as a jumping-off point to learn more about each of these pioneering women.—Anne Bozievich, Friendship Elementary School, Glen Rock, PA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781492641735
Publisher:
Sourcebooks
Publication date:
10/04/2016
Series:
Isabella Series
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
237,087
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 10.50(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
AD410L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Jennifer Fosberry is a science geek turned children's book writer. After running away to Costa Rica for a few years, she returned to the San Francisco Bay area with her husband and three children to read, write, and try to get out of doing housework.

Mike Litwin is an award-winning illustrator who combines oil glazing, color pencil, collage, and other mixed media to create scenes that serve the imagination and education of children.

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