It's Hard to Be Five: Learning How to Work My Control Panel

It's Hard to Be Five: Learning How to Work My Control Panel

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780060080952
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 07/31/2007
Pages: 40
Sales rank: 83,189
Product dimensions: 9.54(w) x 11.32(h) x 0.34(d)
Age Range: 4 - 8 Years

About the Author

Jamie Lee Curtis has had many firsts: her first (and only) marriage to Christopher Guest, her first time holding her children, Annie and Tom, her first time pretending to be a customer in an episode of Quincy, and her first time she wrote words that became her first book. She lives in Los Angeles, the first city she ever lived in, and is always first in line, first to arrive, first to leave, and first to sleep.


Laura Cornell lives in New York City with her daughter, Lily (first and only), but they spend much time in California, Laura's first state in her first home. She was asked to illustrate Jamie's first book, and that became ten. Lucky is the first word that comes to mind.

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It's Hard to Be Five 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 25 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was enjoyed by the 5 year old & the 2 year old. The whole family loves this book. I have had it from the library for 2 weeks now & have read it every single night!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is not just a fun book to read as it acknowledges the feelings about the 'hard stuff' that happens to both boys and girls who are 5---It serves as an outstanding teaching tool that engages five-year-olds in the learning process of gaining 'self control' over their actions. Jamie's concept of a control panel is extremely helpful as it gives the children a concrete visualization that will enable many of them to literally 'switch on and off' to more appropriate behavior. The lively, colorful illustrations are a perfect match to the rhyming text and portray with empathy, clarity and humor a number of tough spots fives find themselves in daily. I love the 'bigger than life backpacks' that for me symbolize the 'load' these little kids sometimes carry around with them. I liked the fact that the book also includes some of the fun, cool stuff about being five, too. As a preschool teacher, I highly recommend this book to read with the children. I would also like to recommend 'The Pocket Parent' to moms and dads with five year-olds for more ideas regarding 'hard stuff' with fives. The author feels reading a picture book with a young child can often get a point across to the child in just the right way. Pocket Parent has a very helpful annotated list of over 100 books relating to children's feelings and misbehaviors. It recommends one of Jamie's other books called 'Today I Feel Silly' as extremely helpful in assiting a child to be able to identify and discuss his or her many different moods and feelings.
Bricca More than 1 year ago
I was looking for a book for my granddaughter who is turning 5 and this is a cute book but more so for Boys so will wait to give this to my grandson when he turns 5! What caught my eye in the reviews and made me want to take a second look was the "And I know when to go" illustration where one reviewer panned the book saying it showed the boy flipping the car off. How funny because IF you look at the boy's hand he is holding it up in a STOP gesture... So I had a good laugh at that one! The review is dated from 2005 and the last review is 2009...kind of dated since it is now 2011. Anyway wanted to correct that misconception that the book has a boy flipping off a car in an illustration. Not so!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My kids love this story - rhyming words and funny illustrations - They seem to like the idea that have the same experiences as the character.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I got this book for my daughter & her friend on their 5th birthdays this year. They both LOVE it and enjoy reading it often.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It's great to be able to read a book to my grandchildren that has a message/messages.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I recently bought this book appropriately for my 5 year old. He asks for it to be read to him nearly every night. He seems to really relate to it, and understands there are other kids out there who feel like he does. I tell him I am glad we figured out it is hard to be five and he nods in agreement, and says ' so am I '
Guest More than 1 year ago
A boy turns five and begins to discover changes all around him. A great book to be read to or by youngsters to let them know that they're not the only ones noticing these things.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book sympathizes with kids at the age of five, in a humorous way. The pictures are adorable, and the rhyme is bouncy and lively--appealing to parents and kids both. We all enjoy it!
alswartzfager on LibraryThing 3 months ago
This is a fantastic book. The illustrations are amazing. The book is about a boy who is 5 and everything that he is learning at this point in his life. At the beginning he is scared, however towards the end he learns how exciting it is to get older and to be able to do things on your own. This is a wonderful book for kindergarteners learning to adjust to their new lifestyles. Also the books rhymes so it would be great to integrate that into a learning discussion too.
simss on LibraryThing 5 months ago
This book is about a boy who turns five and wants to do things by hiself without anybody's help.My personal experience is when I was five I wanted to be independent and do things on my own.Classroom extensions are have students write about when they were five years old.
the_hag on LibraryThing 5 months ago
think what's best about It's Hard to Be Five is that it gets right to the heart of what it is like to be five in a way that isn't condescending or patronizing...it's written in language that is engaging and that kids can relate to easily. The pictures are colorful and zany...very high energy, in all of her books, I think the art really goes a long way toward bringing the message to life for the readers (or listeners, as the case may be as they make excellent read aloud material). At an age where they want to be more "grown up" and independent, yet they still have trouble choosing big-boy (or girl) behavior over the instinctual "little kid" gut reactions, this book is a welcome way to let kids know that what they are feeling is normal while encouraging them to be the big-girl (or boy) that they are! Overall, I give it five stars, The art work and text work seamlessly creating a book that is fun to read and a feast for the eyes. My kids just love poring over the pictures after we read these...there's so much to absorb that provides an additional layer of fun and enjoyment above and beyond the story!! I'd recommend It's Had To Be Five, it is a simply a fun way to explore the feelings many children experience as they become big boys and girls and are expected to act that way but they still FEEL like reacting in highly emotional and instinctual ways.
paroof on LibraryThing 5 months ago
Wow, could my son relate to this book! Even the little brother in the book mirrored his life at home. Great pictures, great premise. Right on about being a five year old - according to my five year old.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I love this book as does my almost 5 year old. It puts into words a lot of what he can't and it is so on target. The humor and illustrations make it a silly, fun book. I noticed in one of the reviews that it said something about the middle finger -- please look at the pictures again. It is not his middle finger, it is his hand that he is holding up to a car to ask for safe crossing as he pushes his sibling's stroller across the street. There is no vulgarity or swearing in this book!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is so incredible and of all the feelings of a five year old actually goes through during their life. They can learn a lot in this book and still enjoy it at the same time.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If anyone is wondering, the cover's jacket is upside down on many books. If you are confused on how to read this book (like I was) turn the jacket around.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I gave this book a one star rating only because I had to give it something in order to have it published in the reviews. It does not deserve any stars. This book does not show one example of a child learning how to work their control panel. The most disappointing is the illustration of knowing when to stop and when to go. I have a great sense of humor, however illustrating a five year old flipping the middle finger at the cars from the crosswalk is unacceptable in a book for 4 to 8 year olds. I for one am returing this book.