Kydd (Kydd Series #1)

Kydd (Kydd Series #1)

by Julian Stockwin
3.9 27

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Kydd (Kydd Series #1) 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 27 reviews.
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dugb2 More than 1 year ago
Enjoyed reading the book. Tells more about the common 'tars' than the officers. Kind of far fetched on how he rises to the top of the heap so soon...
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Rachel Hudson More than 1 year ago
Im sad because im finishing the Bloody Jack series. So im looking for a new seriers like it . I hope these are it!
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Being so far away in time, I had a little trouble with some of the sailor jargon. That's not all bad, and added to the overall ambiance and feeling for being in the story. I did feel a little disjointed in the change in locale. For instance, the reader might be reading about one character and their POV, then in the next paragraph, the scene and the character changes. At least in the eBook edition, there was no demarcation of any sort of scene change. A line, or some other mark to denote a change would've been nice. I've read Patrick O'Brian novels and of course C.S. Forrester, and liked their more flowing style. From reading the Author Notes on this and the next book, I understand his intention to skip over the duller parts of blockade duty, or endless sailing on wide open seas. In my somewhat limited way, I feel this was carried to extremes, to the point that I wonder how the ship, or character could have gotten from one place to another. Granted, not all transitions need to be written. Not being a writer, I have no suggestions to improve. It just felt disjointed, and I needed to go back and reread to see if I had missed something.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
As the author of True Colors, by Valerie Roosa, I have followed your series with great interest. A colorful 'below decks' description and attention to historical accuracy.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Stockwin's debut novel deviates from the tried and tested Midshipman rises to Post Captain genre by having a pressed man as its hero. This opens the doors wide open to an investigation of the true nature of British naval supremacy in the Nineteenth Century. What happened to an involuntary recruit in His Majesty's Navy that enabled him to outfight all others? How did eight hundred strangers get along in a wooden prison and merge into the most remarkable team? This is a very welcome twist to the well-established genre of nautical novels. Kydd is a very well-paced book, a late night page turner which relies heavily on plot to develop its characters. Even the introduction to the mechanics of a square rigged vessel is handled deftly and remains interesting. Glimpses of a more earthy, Marryat-like sense of humour make a welcome return to the naval novel. Can anyone remember Hornblower, Ramage or Bolitho saying anything funny? Lovers of O'Brian will perhaps be disappointed by an absence of the more erudite dialogue and sheer mastery of prose, but he's dead... lets move on. Besides which the plot is too pacy for that and can anyone imagine the messes on the lower gundeck breaking out a cello and discussing flora and fauna? All in all Kydd is well worth a read and has already surpassed Forrester in my pantheon of favourite nauitical authors. A task which took O'Brian five books, to my mind. Not wishing to sound heretical I should state that I believe the Aubrey/Maturin series to be the absolute Master and Commander of the genre. But, go on give it a try, you might like it!
Guest More than 1 year ago
A good seafaring romp that will keep you entertained without burdening you with the language of Patrick O'Brien (or whatever his real name is...hmmm). The series can be as good as Hornblower at times, but if you're already into Hornblower, stick with him. Kydd offers little more or little difference.