Learning Python

Learning Python

by Mark Lutz
3.3 21

Paperback(Fifth Edition)

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Overview

Learning Python by Mark Lutz

Get a comprehensive, in-depth introduction to the core Python language with this hands-on book. Based on author Mark Lutz’s popular training course, this updated fifth edition will help you quickly write efficient, high-quality code with Python. It’s an ideal way to begin, whether you’re new to programming or a professional developer versed in other languages.

Complete with quizzes, exercises, and helpful illustrations, this easy-to-follow, self-paced tutorial gets you started with both Python 2.7 and 3.3— the latest releases in the 3.X and 2.X lines—plus all other releases in common use today. You’ll also learn some advanced language features that recently have become more common in Python code.

  • Explore Python’s major built-in object types such as numbers, lists, and dictionaries
  • Create and process objects with Python statements, and learn Python’s general syntax model
  • Use functions to avoid code redundancy and package code for reuse
  • Organize statements, functions, and other tools into larger components with modules
  • Dive into classes: Python’s object-oriented programming tool for structuring code
  • Write large programs with Python’s exception-handling model and development tools
  • Learn advanced Python tools, including decorators, descriptors, metaclasses, and Unicode processing

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781449355739
Publisher: O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
Publication date: 07/03/2013
Edition description: Fifth Edition
Pages: 1540
Sales rank: 69,978
Product dimensions: 7.00(w) x 9.20(h) x 2.80(d)

About the Author

Mark Lutz is a leading Python trainer, the author of Python’s earliest and best-selling texts, and a pioneering figure in the Python world.

Mark is the author of the three O’Reilly books: Learning Python, Programming Python, and Python Pocket Reference, all currently in fourth or fifth editions. He has been using and promoting Python since 1992, started writing Python books in 1995, and began teaching Python classes in 1997. As of Spring 2013, Mark has instructed 260 Python training sessions, taught roughly 4,000 students in live classes, and written Python books that have sold 400,000 units and been translated to at least a dozen languages.

Together, his two decades of Python efforts have helped to establish it as one of the most widely used programming languages in the world today. In addition, Mark has been in the software field for 30 years. He holds BS and MS degrees in computer science from the University of Wisconsin where he explored implementations of the Prolog language, and over his career has worked as a professional software developer on compilers, programming tools, scripting applications, and assorted client/server systems.

Mark maintains a training website (http://learning-python.com) and an additional book support site on the Web (http://www.rmi.net/~lutz).

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Learning Python 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 21 reviews.
sldonb42 More than 1 year ago
If you go to the page for the 4th edition and press the link to download a sample, you WILL get a sample for the 2nd edition...covering Python 2.3, not 2.6 and 3.1. The same if you buy it without rooting around through the editions listed as ebooks. B&N will then tell you that they do not issue refunds for ebooks.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Its a freaking 4494 page sample totally get the free sample( this ' sample'includes all chaptets except the appendexs)very well written good for the begginnr and more experianced alike
Guest More than 1 year ago
It gives a thorough description of how to use Python; which is indeed easy to learn if you already know another language. But when the authors say that not having to compile Python programs means that development time is speeded up, perhaps they are overstating. For most programmers who use compiled languages like C or C++, the biggest time is taken up in finding a method that solves a problem, coding it and subsequent debugging. These days, compilers on recent hardware are fast enough that link/compile times are simply not a bottleneck to development productivity. So it is a bit of a straw dummy that the authors put forth. However, they are absolutely spot on when comparing this to Perl or Tcl. Perl is powerful, but its code looks like assembler. Perl gurus tend to shrug when you point this out, usually saying they understand it, with the not-so-implicit suggestion that if you can't, it is your fault. But this leads to a real maintenance problem and a barrier to entry to others. The cleaner Python syntax can show coding intent far clearer. Plus, and more importantly, the object oriented nature of Python lets you scale up to much larger programs. This has always been a problem with scripting languages, all the way back to the various unix shell scripts and DOS bat files. Often, the most those ever gave you in terms of modular capabilities was the equivalent of subroutines. Which is strictly procedural and not OO. By the way, there is a small contradiction between the above claim that Python is more understandable than Perl and the claim that it has an advantage over C++ or Java because it is not as verbose as those. Typically, in increasing amount of source code, you have Perl -> Python -> (C++,Java). If you think that Python is more understandable than Perl, then by that same logic, we could conclude that C++ or Java is more understandable than Python. So if you are using Perl or Tcl and want something better, Python is a good choice. A good upgrade path. But if you are currently using C or C++, with maybe X for graphics, or Java, then I suggest you stay with those. All three languages, with their graphics, give you a far richer toolset. Python would be a retrograde choice.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The sample gives no understanding of how this book will be teaching the language and is just about the history of python, its uses and the authors view on 2.x vs 3.x. Hard to tell what this book will be like as it gets very mixed reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Even the sample is very good.The very very good book for beginner.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Never give up.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Excellent for beginner but still worthwhile for more advanced python programmer
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is an excellent book to teach yourself Python! I have the 4th edition. It focuses on Python 3.2 but explains the differences with Python 2.7 and earlier versions as those areas are encountered in the book. The book starts with the basics, which most will find very easy, and proceeds to the most advanced Python topics. Every chapter builds on what was taught in previous chapters. There are numerous WORKING examples throughout the book, and the author has a web site where you may down load all of the examples. I have Python 3.2 and 2.7 and have run most of the examples in both versions. This is an EXCELLENT book if you need, or just want to learn Python!
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