Liars and Saints

Liars and Saints

by Maile Meloy
4.2 17

Paperback(First Scribner Trade Paperback Edition)

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Liars and Saints 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The first review isn't being entirely accurate. Liars and Saints reads more like a collection of short stories rather than a continuous narrative. The story spans many events over multiple generations and is told in chunks from different family members' viewpoints. That is why there are frequently large gaps in time. Normally I don't like that, but in this book you never feel like you're missing out on anything. Reading from the different family members' perspectives gives a lot of insight into the characters and lends to the overall feel of the book as a collage of stories. I liked it and would recommend but not for the average reader.
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TheUtleyReader More than 1 year ago
A New York Times book review put me onto Maile Meloy. She is a keen observer of life and brings those insights to her characters. Her recently published collection of short stories is equally compelling.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This novel contains a ridiculous chain of events and character actions, most occurring without any necessary foundation to explain them. Yvette, totally disappointed in her lackluster husband steps out of the story for a while, then returns in a celebration to renew her marriage vows with this same husband saying, he was the best man for her. There is no evidence of how or why her feelings suddenly changed. Similarly, her daughter Clarissa seems to have an insatiable appetite for men, and with no provocation the reader is aware of, announces herself to be a lesbian. This is a novel where dreams are so totally accepted as precursors of events to happen within the next 24 hours, that the dreamer need not express any evident surprise when his or her dream comes to fruition. A very disappointing read.