ISBN-10:
038797072X
ISBN-13:
9780387970721
Pub. Date:
02/20/1990
Publisher:
Springer New York
LISP, Lore, and Logic: An Algebraic View of LISP Programming, Foundations, and Applications / Edition 1

LISP, Lore, and Logic: An Algebraic View of LISP Programming, Foundations, and Applications / Edition 1

by W. Richard Stark

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780387970721
Publisher: Springer New York
Publication date: 02/20/1990
Edition description: Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed. 1990
Pages: 278
Product dimensions: 6.10(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.02(d)

Table of Contents

1 A First Look at LISP.- 1.1 The origins of LISP.- 1.2 A glimpse into the structure of LISP.- 1.2.1 Data.- 1.2.2 Functions.- 1.2.3 Expressions in the language.- 1.2.4 Quote.- 1.2.5 Logical terms.- 1.2.6 Branching in computations.- 1.2.7 Lambda functions.- 1.2.8 Assignments.- 1.3 Additional reading.- 2 Elementary Programming.- 2.1 Programming straightforward computations.- 2.2 Recursive and iterative computations.- 2.2.1 A general view of recursion.- 2.2.2 Programming recursive computations.- 2.2.3 Rules for recursive programming.- 2.2.4 Iteration.- 2.3 External files.- 2.4 Searching.- 2.4.1 Is searching a sign of ignorance?.- 2.4.2 Kinds of search.- 2.5 Extra variables and functions, for efficiency.- 2.6 Other list functions.- 2.6.1 MEMBER and more.- 2.6.2 Functions for association lists.- 2.6.3 Example: translation between Inuit and English.- 2.7 The fixed-point style of computation.- 2.8 Input and output.- 2.9 The procedural and functional styles of computation.- 2.10 Additional reading.- 3 Deeper into Essential Structure.- 3.1 LISP’S data.- 3.1.1 S-expressions.- 3.1.2 Representations of data.- 3.1.3 Atoms.- 3.1.4 Data types.- 3.2 Another look at familiar functions.- 3.2.1 CAR, CDR, and CONS: an alternate semantics.- 3.2.2 EQ and EQUAL.- 3.2.3 Options for LAMBDA functions.- 3.2.4 SETF.- 3.3 LISP syntax in detail.- 3.3.1 Terms.- 3.3.2 Variables and forms.- 3.3.3 Syntax puzzles.- 3.4 Self-processing.- 3.5 Bindings, scopes, and environments.- 3.6 Additional reading.- 4 Computational Philosophy.- 4.1 Models of computation.- 4.1.1 Mathematical formalisms for computation.- 4.1.2 Church’s thesis and computational completeness.- 4.2 Pure LISP.- 4.3 Types of recursion.- 4.3.1 Fat recursion and tail recursion.- 4.3.2 Compound recursion.- 4.3.3 Monotonic and nonmonotonic recursion.- 4.4 The limits of LISP: an unsolvable problem.- 4.5 The folklore of fixed-point computation.- 4.6 Additional Reading.- 5 LISP Functions for Powerful Programming.- 5.1 Debugging tools.- 5.1.1 The listener, access to local bindings, and Backtrace.- 5.1.2 STEP and TRACE.- 5.1.3 Other tools for debugging.- 5.1.4 Application: debugging a LISP text (optional).- 5.2 Applicative operators.- 5.2.1 APPLY, FUNCALL, MAPCAR, and MAPLIST.- 5.2.2 Application: symbolic differentiation.- 5.3 Macros.- 5.3.1 The basic idea.- 5.3.2 Applications: INFIX and EVAL&TIME.- 5.4 Structures, vectors, and arrays.- 5.4.1 Vectors and arrays.- 5.4.2 Structures.- 5.4.3 Application: working with organic molecules.- 5.5 Function closures.- 5.5.1 Creating and using closures.- 5.5.2 Application: COMPOSE and Currying CONS.- 5.6 COERCion.- 5.7 Surgical operations.- 6 Interpreters: from Algebra to LISP.- 6.1 Algebras and interpreting: an abstract view.- 6.1.1 Algebras of objects and algebras of terms.- 6.1.2 Interpretation and computation.- 6.2 LISP interpreters.- 6.2.1 A sketch of the usual LISP interpreter.- 6.2.2 A call-by-name interpreter for LISP.- 6.2.3 Put the interpreter inside, keep the user out.- 6.3 Compiled LISP.- 7 Mathematical Foundations of LISP.- 7.1 The lambda calculus defined.- 7.2 Straightforward computation in the lambda calculus.- 7.3 Fixed-points for object functions.- 7.4 Recursive functions in the lambda calculus.- 7.5 Pure LISP in the lambda calculus.- 7.6 Additional reading.- 8 Automatic Reasoning, Algebraic Intelligence.- 8.1 Logics.- 8.1.1 Prepositional logic.- 8.1.2 Fundamental theorems for the propositional calculus.- 8.1.3 Other approaches to automatic reasoning in PC.- 8.2 Predicate logic and unification.- 8.3 Prolog.- 8.4 Speculation on algebraic intelligence.- 8.5 Additional reading.- 9 Bibliography.- 10 Answers to Selected Exercises.- 11 Index.

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