Lock & Key

Lock & Key

by Gordon Bonnet

NOOK Book(eBook)

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Product Details

BN ID: 2940158206382
Publisher: Fleet Press
Publication date: 07/04/2016
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 452
Sales rank: 286,674
File size: 812 KB

About the Author

Gordon Bonnet has been writing fiction for decades. Encouraged when his story Crazy Bird Bends His Beak won critical acclaim in Mrs. Moore’s 1st grade class at Central Elementary School in St. Albans, West Virginia, he embarked on a long love affair with the written word.

His interest in the paranormal goes back almost that far, although it has always been tempered by Gordon’s scientific training. This has led to a strange duality; his work as a skeptic and debunker on the popular blog Skeptophilia, while simultaneously writing paranormal and speculative novels, novellas, and short stories. He blogs daily, but is never without a piece of fiction in progress—driven to continue, as he puts it, “because I want to find out how the story ends.”

Stay up to date with Gordon and all his writing and appearances on Facebook, Twitter, or at www.gordonbonnet.com. You’ll also find more great fiction on his writing blog, Tales of Whoa.

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Lock & Key 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Interesting concept and I was kept on the edge of my seat!! Hard to put the book down! Great characters and excellent attention to the time!
Anonymous 11 months ago
Wow! I really loved this book. Bumbling Hero with lots of pluck literally saves the world. What could be more fun?
writester More than 1 year ago
I recently took the time to read Lock & Key by Gordon Bonnet. While I don’t typically write science fiction (I’ve written a short story or two, but not a novel—well, not yet, anyway), I do enjoy reading it. I’m often leery about an unknown author in this genre, because if the storyworld isn’t properly developed, if the details of the fiction aren’t well-thought out, then the story won’t seem real and it’s a disappointing read. Well, I don’t know if you’ve heard of Gordon Bonnet or not, but if you haven’t, pay attention. Last year, I read a book of his called Kill Switch, and from the first page I knew I’d want to read all of his work. So when Lock & Key came out, I immediately added it to my to-be-read list. It didn’t disappoint. In fact, it thoroughly impressed me. Lock & Key takes place in the present. Sort of. Well, that’s where it starts. Protagonist Darren Ault is an unassuming bookstore owner who, after an ordinary day, meets his best friend, Lee McCaskill (a brilliant scientist) for an ordinary dinner. Then the extraordinary happens. Lee shoots Darren in the head. End of story, right? Wrong. Darren doesn’t die. Instead, he’s whisked to the Library of Timelines, where the Head Librarian and his administrative assistant are more than a little upset that things have transpired the way they have. Not only did Darren survive the shooting, the rest of the world has vanished. The Head Librarian researches the problem and discovers there were three places in the past where timelines diverged, possible places where Darren can make things right and reset the balance of humanity. With seemingly no other choice, Darren begins a journey through time and history to right the wrongs of temporal disorder and bring humanity back into existence. So, like I mentioned earlier, if the intricate details of the science fiction world aren’t thoroughly considered, the story can fall apart. But Bonnet did a wonderful job of thinking through all the possible problems and pitfalls (and we all know time travel presents a lot of them) and providing the reader with a story that not only logically flows, it thrills. Each era and locale visited evokes images of what those times were really like. Readers smell the odoriferous scents, hear the sounds of nature, taste the bland local cuisine. We’re transported there right along with Darren. And when he’s back at the Library, we’re treated to witty banter and technological wonders. All this while seamlessly advancing a wonderful plot that keeps the reader rapidly turning pages. I read the whole novel in one sitting. Here's an example of the confusing situation Darren finds himself in: "Man, this stuff makes my head hurt." "You should complain," Fischer said, a little bitterly. "You only have to keep track of yourself. I have to keep track of everybody who ever existed, and also all the ones who don't. You want my job?" "No. But still... I mean, that doesn't make sense." "What doesn't?" "If my grandma never existed, how can I be here?" I thoroughly recommend Lock & Key by Gordon Bonnet. The characters are three-dimensional, the plot is well-developed, and the settings are rich and tangible. If you love sci-fi, you don’t want to miss this novel. And if you’re new to the genre, this is a great one to start with.