Martin the Warrior (Redwall Series #6)

Martin the Warrior (Redwall Series #6)

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Overview

Martin the Warrior (Redwall Series #6) by Brian Jacques, Gary Chalk

A shadow has fallen on the shore of the Eastern sea, a shadow called Marshank. In this cold stone fortress a stoat named Badrang holds dozens of innocent creatures as slaves, part of his scheme to build an empire where he will rule as unquestioned tyrant.

Among those slaves is a mouse named Martin who has a warrior's heart, and a burning desire for freedom—freedom not ony for himself, but for all of Badrang's victims. There is no risk he will not take, no battle he will not fight, to end the stoat's evil reign, and in the process regain the sword of his father, Luke the Warrior—the sword that Badrang stole from him when he was but a lad.

Once again master storyteller Brian Jazques has crafted an epic advewnture and filled it to the bursting point with unforgettable characters, including villians so hilariously evil you'll barely be able to keep from hissing them, and loveable woodland creatures so brave you'll want to stand and cheer as they fight for their freedom.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780142400555
Publisher: Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date: 02/09/2004
Series: Redwall Series , #6
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 384
Sales rank: 154,304
Product dimensions: 5.00(w) x 7.80(h) x 1.00(d)
Lexile: 890L (what's this?)
Age Range: 10 - 14 Years

About the Author

Brian Jacques was both a master storyteller and a jack-of-all-trades. He lived the life of a sailor, actor, stand-up comedian, radio host, bobby, even a bus driver. He was the recipient of an honorary doctorate in literature from the University of Liverpool and a New York Times bestselling author of more than twenty-five books for younger readers, including the wildly popular Redwall series. Dr. Jacques was a lifelong resident of Liverpool, England.

Date of Birth:

June 15, 1939

Date of Death:

February 5, 2011

Place of Birth:

Liverpool, England

Place of Death:

Liverpool, England

Education:

St. John¿s School, Liverpool, England

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Martin the Warrior (Redwall Series #6) 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 120 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is awesome, I read it over a christmas break and I couldn't put it down! It envelopes you in the tory and makes you love all the characters, I liked Grumm the most because of his strange dialect. I've yet to read a better book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
An outstanding book once I opened it I never put it down!
Anonymous 9 months ago
Enroll res one
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Jacques 6th novel in the Redwall serries is a must read first for any one starting the Redwall serries. Martin the warrior is a key character who is essential in all of the books in the serries & his begginings as chronicled in this book helps set the stage for the others. this one by far is my favorite of all the books and i find it an excellent read overall. For a sort of Triligical beginning of the serries i recomend this book followed by Mossflower & the Ledgend of Luke.
Yoshicoto More than 1 year ago
Only a man like Brian Jacques to bring tears to my eyes because of a story about mice. Martin the Warrior was a book that I read back in fifth grade, then re-read last week in the tenth grade. The story never ceases to amaze me. In the world of Redwall, animals both good and bad come together and adventure. One of the best qualities of the Redwall series as a whole is that you can start anywhere you want. Martin the Warrior is the sixth in the series and I read it first. It'd be more beneficial to read it in order, but it really doesn't matter. Martin the Warrior follows the brave and bold warrior Martin, son of Luke, Redwall's previous glorified hero. Martin spends the entire book fighting off an evil tyrant named Badrang. The story proves that no matter how daunting or unnerving you're opposition may appear, you must endure. I loved how amazingly easy it was to enjoy this book and how you could relate to it still knowing that the whole time, you're reading about animals. The only thing I disliked was how it dragged on. It felt there was many parts he could've just scrapped without changing the ending in any way. It can also be a bit hard to understand the dialogue of the moles due to the way their accent is written, however, one shouldn't set this book aside merely for those couple of flaws. Many should read this book, especially if you're young like me for the simple fact that it will make you a better reader. I have the Redwall series to thank for much of my literary knowledge. For recommendations, I highly, highly recommend the entire Redwall series. My personal favorites are The Legend of Luke, Lord Brocktree, and Outcast of Redwall.
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In Martin the Warrior Lord Badrang has many slaves in his fortress of Marshank. Martin, son of Luke the Warrior, promised his father he would keep his sword safe but Badrang took it from him and enslaved him. Over the seasons Martin grew stronger. He finally escaped with the help of some new friends. He was thrown in the dugeon by lord badrang along with two others. Brome and Feldoh were in the dungeon with him. Brome's sister Rose and her friend Grumm helped them escape. When they were running away from Marshank they ran into badrang's enemy Tramun Clogg. They tried to swim away but they were separated when a big fish tried to attack them. Brome and Feldoh wandered around for a while and met the Rambling Rosehip Players. Rose, Martin, and Grumm were taken captive by a tribe of Pygmy shrews. They met Pallum who was also a slave of the pygmy shrews. They earned their freedom when Dinjer the son of Queen Amballa was taken by a seabird. Martin raced up the cliff and saved Dinjer. The Rambling Rosehip players helped to free some slaves. Martin, Rose, Grumm, and Pallum made an army with the help of some friends. They got to Marshank just as Brome and Felldoh's army was about to be defeated. There were many positives in this book like it was funny, there was always something going on, and all of the characters were animals. These are positives for me because I like funny books. I also like it when there is always something or more than one thing going on in the story. I also like animals as characters because it makes the book more interesting. There was one negative I found in the book and it was that there was too much war, but all the Redwall books I've read have had alot of war in them. The writing style of Brian Jacques is that he is very descriptive. He has many adventures going on at once. He switches back and forth between them. Brian Jacques tells the story by making a character tell it from third person omniscient point of view. This character did not witness these events but tells the story to another character. In Redwall Abbey there is a tapestry with a picture of Martin on it and a traveler named Aubritia asks Father Saxtus if he knows alot about Martin, he does not and she tells him the story. The characters speak in different dialect, the moles "oi" instead of "i" and they and "n"s before "d"s and "t"s. The hares say "jolly", "chap", and " wot wot". I would recommend this book to kids around the age of 12 because there is alot of fighting and some of the characters names are hard to pronounce. I wouldn't recommend this book to extreme animal lovers because weasels, rats, and stoats get killed often in the book. Some similar books are Redwall, Mossflower, Mattimeo, Mariel of Redwall, and Salamandastron. I think that Martin the Warrior is a very good book.
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