ISBN-10:
0520257383
ISBN-13:
9780520257382
Pub. Date:
10/02/2008
Publisher:
University of California Press
Perfection Salad: Women and Cooking at the Turn of the Century / Edition 1

Perfection Salad: Women and Cooking at the Turn of the Century / Edition 1

by Laura ShapiroLaura Shapiro
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Overview

Toasted marshmallows stuffed with raisins? Green-and-white luncheons? Chemistry in the kitchen? This entertaining and erudite social history, now in its fourth paperback edition, tells the remarkable story of America's transformation from a nation of honest appetites into an obedient market for instant mashed potatoes. In Perfection Salad, Laura Shapiro investigates a band of passionate but ladylike reformers at the turn of the twentieth century—including Fannie Farmer of the Boston Cooking School—who were determined to modernize the American diet through a "scientific" approach to cooking. Shapiro's fascinating tale shows why we think the way we do about food today.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780520257382
Publisher: University of California Press
Publication date: 10/02/2008
Series: California Studies in Food and Culture , #24
Edition description: First Edition, With a New Afterword
Pages: 296
Sales rank: 658,467
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.20(h) x 0.80(d)

About the Author

Laura Shapiro was on staff at Newsweek and is a contributor to the New York Times, Rolling Stone, Granta, and Gourmet. She is the author of Julia Child and Something from the Oven: Reinventing Dinner in 1950s America.

Table of Contents

PROLOGUE: Toasted Marshmallows Stuffed with Raisins 

ONE: Drudgery Divine 

TWO: And the Kitchen Becomes the Workshop of the Skies 

THREE: Better Ways, Lighter Burdens, More Wholesome Results 

FOUR: Perfection Salad 

FIVE: The Mother of Level Measurements 

SIX: Whoever Knew a Dyspeptic to Be a Christian? 

SEVEN: Foes in Our Own Household 

EIGHT: An Absolutely New Product 

CONCLUSION: A Leaf or Two of Lettuce 

Afterword 
Acknowledgments 
Notes 
Bibliography 
Index

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