Rooftops of Tehran: A Novel

Rooftops of Tehran: A Novel

by Mahbod Seraji
4.6 43

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Rooftops of Tehran 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 43 reviews.
sa09 More than 1 year ago
This book was filled with the mysteries of daily life and the difficulties of the Iranian peoples. From two lovesick young teens to young men wanting love they can't share with the women they want, to the heartbreak of mysterious death and disappearing life as they know it. Would love to read another novel this author releases; very descriptive, moving and thoroughly enjoyable. A DEFINITE read for book clubs!
BookFanatic132 More than 1 year ago
The blurb pretty much sums this whole book up. We have Pasha Shahed, who is a normal teenager like most people have been. He spends his summer on the rooftop and he's enjoying life. But one thing will change his life forever: love. Not only does Pasha's love with Zari have an impact on him, it has an impact on everyone around him. Pasha grows up and matures throughout the book—he's no longer blind to the things going around him. He loves deeply and truly, and he also cares a lot for the people around him. He has moments where he doubts the things he's been taught, his religion, and many things like that. That's what made this book so realistic. This book is truly a coming-of-age novel—and a really good one at that. Zari, in my eyes, is brave as she is reckless. Her decision was an act that in order to commit it, one had to be brave. But she also had to pay for her actions, which affected other people besides her. I'm not sure if she thought that part through, but then she, in a way, opened other people's eyes to the things she say. I hold a lot of respect for Zari. This book is powerful. Just as Zari's choice opened Pasha's eyes, it opened my eyes to a lot of the problems people around the world face and though some of them aren't in the USA, we should still know about them. Rooftops of Tehran brought out dozens of emotions. While reading this book, I cried. When I finished this book, I cried. The ending left me wanting for more. I truly hope there is a sequel, but if there's not I'm content with how the book ended. It ended perfectly for a stand-alone book, but also for the book that has a sequel. Either way, this book is a great book that teaches great life lessons and is a heartwarming as well as heartbreaking story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was really fond of this book and loved how I was able to see how life was during the Shah's dictatorship. It really opened my eyes, many of my Iranian friends still feel like it's the same today. Thank you for this wonderful book and I recommend it to all that is curious about Iran.
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sassypickle More than 1 year ago
Mr. Seraji tells a passionate yet sad and heartbreaking tale about teens approaching adulthood in Iran. Captivating story with a twist at the end. Hopefully there will be a sequel.
Lucia Andrade More than 1 year ago
The best book ever written, simply put.
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TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
Set in the summer of 1973, 17-year-old Pasha Shashed spends most of his summer on the rooftops with Ahmed, his best friend. They joke around and talk about the future, life, and love. Crushing on Zari, the betrothed of his mentor, the neighborhood radical, Ramin Sobhi. Torn between his feelings for Zari and his loyalty to Ramin, he feels guilty over their friendship, but can't resist spending time with her. Pasha's life comes crashing down, however, when the Shah's secret police take away Ramin and kill him. Forced to grow up fast and come to terms with his feelings for Zari, his country's ruler, and his connection to his dead friend, summers will never be the same for Pasha ever again. A touching, endearing story about coming of age and falling in love. The characters are well-developed and believable. The plot is hard-hitting and well-done. Readers everywhere will relate to this novel of discovering one's self. Readers who like more modern historical fiction, stories from other countries, and semi-autobiographical novels will enjoy reading ROOFTOPS OF TEHRAN.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
MB-Loves-to-read More than 1 year ago
An easy read and very current even though it was set in the 70's. Found it thought provoking as the characters exbited different personalities then one would imagine. It's refreshing to read a book that provides a different understanding of an unknown culture.
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crimekitty763 More than 1 year ago
This book reminded me of THE KITE RUNNER. It is the story of teenagers growing up in Tehran and the difficulties they had to face. It was written during the overthrow of the Shah and the turbulence that followed. If you enjoy stories of other cultures, this is a book you should read. I highly recommend it.
Elsie_Brooks More than 1 year ago
In Rooftops of Tehran, Mahbod Seraji masterfully weaves Pasha's coming of age story into the instability of Iran's political climate. Seraji's language and vivid descriptions immediately transport his reader to Tehran as it was in the early 1970s. He allows the reader to understand how politics, culture, education, and religion interplay in the decisions young adults make, while focusing on the constants in their lives: family, friendship, and school. Seraji holds no punches in describing the prevalence of Iranian hostility toward and suspicion of the United States. At the same time, Pasha's parents are encouraging him to study engineering in the US to bring change and advancement to Iran upon completion of his studies. Further, Pasha relates incidents in his life to those in American movies and gives much thought to western attitudes toward romance and marriage. Rooftops of Tehran is a beautiful coming of age story with a good balance of philosophy, religion, and politics. This novel is an ideal work to discuss in book groups or a liberal studies curriculum.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was easily one of the best romance stories I've ever read. The characters were relateable and entirely unique, the plot gripping and shocking; the type of book you can read for hours without realizing any time has passed. It gives fascinating insights into Iran's culture and was, overall, unforgettable. However, two warnings: 1. Be ready to cry 2. This is not a book for younger readers, as it is filled with cursing and crude humor. All the same, this is a story we all need to read.
SuperMomof4 More than 1 year ago
"The Rooftops of Tehran" was a well-written glimpse into Iran in the 1970's. The story was beautiful and the characters were quite memorable. There is much to admire about this debut novel by Mahbod Seraji and it provides a great deal to ponder. I picked this novel up to share with my teens (it was listed on a teen summer reading list); however, I will not pass the book along to them because of certain parts of the book that were not appropriate for adolescents. The book would have been much better had the gratuitous profanity and explicit discussions of masturbation and homosexual child abuse been omitted. Overall, I liked "The Rooftops of Tehran" and look forward to other works by this author.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago