Small Island

Small Island

by Andrea Levy
4.2 50

Paperback(New edition)

$11.83 $17.00 Save 30% Current price is $11.83, Original price is $17. You Save 30%.
View All Available Formats & Editions
Eligible for FREE SHIPPING
  • Use Standard Shipping ,  For guaranteed delivery by Dec. 24.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Small Island 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 50 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
And I can think of many more adjectives to describe this remarkable story, which is about the experience of Caribbean people who immigrated to Britain after the 1940s war. The author's writing style is fantastic. The story is told in four different voices from the point of view of four different people. As a Caribbean person myself, while at times I was angry, other times I found the story dropdead hilarious. Beaurocratic red tape is alluded to and throughout the squalor and indignity, there is a warmth and even hope in this story. Well done!
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book was beautiful. Slow in a few places, but wonderfully written. Touching, thought-provoking, funny, maddening, you have to have an opinion about it. What surprised me the most was the most interesting character turned out to be, for me, Bernard. The end of the book had a great twist and this will make me read all the author's books. Surprised this wasn't nominated for a Pulitzer. Very, very, very worth your while!!
Marek_S More than 1 year ago
Small Island is a beautiful story told by four different narrators, two Jamaican and two British. All four are trying to make sense of post-WWII Britain and how they fit into a slowly rebuilding England. The Jamaicans leave their homeland in search of greater opportunity, a small garden, a bell at the front door; but what they find awaiting them in their Mother Country is much different than what they anticipated. She's not quite the loving mother they thought she would be. All four of the narrators' lives become intermingled with the others in a moving story about love, loss, opportunity, and starting afresh after a tumultuous journey.
tamesthetic More than 1 year ago
This book is amazing - not just because it should be a reference in Jamaican literature - not just because it should be a staple in any library - not only because it is bigger than the small island mind that it portrays here, but because of the style is pure genius and the writing is clean, beautiful and mesmerizing. I doubt she will be able to top herself any time soon. Andrea is the Queen of literature. I'm about to read Fruit of the Lemon - i think that's what it's called. I won't get my hopes up for it to be as good as this.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is a beautiful tale of four vivid characters. I was drawn in and could not help but keep turning the pages to know what was next. I've recommended it to friends and family who have all reported similar experiences.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am an avid reader, and I found this book to be possibly the best I've ever read. Ms. Levy is a genius. Every sentence, much less paragraph and chapter is a work of art. Character development is beautiful, and the interrelationship of the characters is fascinating. I never wanted to put it down, and I certainly didn't want it to end. This book should be at the top of everyone's list - I would give it 10 stars if I could.
Karczra More than 1 year ago
I had to purchase this book for an English course I took at the University of Wisconsin- Eau Claire. The story is such an interesting read and the format is easy to get into as well as the pages are unique with how they're cut. I loved this book so much that I bought another to give as a gift to someone close! It's a great edition to any library.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
After PBS aired the first half of this story I was left hanging wondering what happened to the characters. Glad I was found this Nook book. I enjoyed it thoroughly. I am a fan of novels that use history as a background. I learn how people lived during those times of war, depression etc. This novel was a great read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Small Island is the amazing story on the first wave of Jamaican immigrants who arrived in Britain after WWII. With beautifully grafted characters and a gripping story line, the narrative takes you through different cultures, people and life styles, and through the dialogue, we are given access to the souls of the characters in their moments of weakness, doubts, fears and dreams. The plot is fantastic and the pace of the novel is so fast and gripping that you will end up finishing the book before you realize it. If you are into Cosmopolitan or multi-cultural fiction, then get this novel.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very much recommended
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ill meet you at res 7.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
ECottrell_RiverwoodWriter More than 1 year ago
History from a unique perspective. I gave it a solid 4, because it offered a glimpse into a slice of postwar (WWII) history from a unique perspective - that of Jamaican immigrants in Britain. The voice changes between the four main characters: Hortense and her husband Gilbert from Jamaica and their white landlord Queenie and her husband, Bernard. The Jamaican patois lent an authentic touch, and since the author was born in England to Jamaican parents, I wondered if there wasn't a good bit of family biography disguised as fiction. The theme of third world citizens dreaming of escaping to what they believe will be a grander, happier life is not new, and Hortense, well educated for her Jamaican community and with high aspirations of teaching in England, certainly had dreams that were shattered again and again. Gilbert, who had fought valiantly in the RAF during the war, expects to be hailed as a war hero. Both encounter unexpected racism and snobbery in 1948 London as they compete unsuccessfully with thousands of returning soldiers who are also looking for jobs. Queenie deals with loneliness and lust as her dull banker husband goes to war and doesn't return when it's over. When he finally does show up, he has faced demons of his own in the awful things he witnessed, and now he must deal with a wife who not only thought he was dead but who is also pregnant. The threads of racism, sexual and cultural tension, colonialism, and the deprivations and hardships of war are all drawn well. Each of the characters is flawed in his or her own way, but as products of their own pasts and circumstances, they were portrayed movingly, realistically, and compassionately. One of the most poignant aspects of the book -- RAF veteran Gilbert's rejection by Londoners after fighting with great devotion for his mother country, England -- was described in a review from Publishers Weekly: "When Gilbert realizes that his pride in the British Empire is not reciprocated, he wonders, 'How come England did not know me?' His question haunts the story as it moves back and forth in time and space to show how the people of two small islands become inextricably bound together."
Two2dogs More than 1 year ago
Loved the story This is a very sad but true story. Hortense & Gilbert were such believeable characters, they make you laugh and they make you cry! I did not expect the ending, very surprising and came together well. Sad that we treat and judge other human beings by the color of their skin.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
british40 More than 1 year ago
This was an excellent read it showed how carribean people were treated by a country they thought were their common wealth.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago