ISBN-10:
0470073861
ISBN-13:
9780470073865
Pub. Date:
01/02/2008
Publisher:
Wiley
Software Development Rhythms: Harmonizing Agile Practices for Synergy / Edition 1

Software Development Rhythms: Harmonizing Agile Practices for Synergy / Edition 1

by Kim Man Lui, Keith C. C. Chan

Hardcover

Current price is , Original price is $100.99. You

Temporarily Out of Stock Online

Please check back later for updated availability.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780470073865
Publisher: Wiley
Publication date: 01/02/2008
Pages: 328
Product dimensions: 6.40(w) x 9.55(h) x 0.85(d)

About the Author

Kim Man Lui, PhD, is an Independent Consultant and a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Computing at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University. Dr Lui is a Certified Database Administrator, a Certified Oracle Database Administrator, and a Sun Certified Java Programmer. He is also the author of two books.

Keith C.C. Chan, PhD, is Professor and Head of the Department of Computing at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University. Previously, he was a senior analyst at the IBM Canada Laboratory, Toronto.

Read an Excerpt

Click to read or download

Table of Contents

PART I: ESSENTIALS.

Chapter 1: No Programmer Dies.

1.1 Developing Software vs. Building a Tunnel.

1.1.1 The good old days?

1.1.2 The more things change the more they stay the same?

1.1.3 Behind Software Products.

1.1.4 Deal or not deal.

1.2 Do-Re-Mi Do-Re-Mi.

1.2.1 Iterative Models.

1.2.2 Code and Fix.

1.2.3 Chaos.

1.2.4 Methodology that matters.

1.3 Software Development Rhythms.

1.3.1 Stave Chart by Example.

1.3.2 Game Theory.

1.3.3 IN-OUT Diagram.

1.3.4 Master-Coach Diagram.

1.3.5 No Mathematics.

1.3.6 Where to Explore Rhythms.

Chapter 2: Understanding Programmers.

2.1 Personality and Intelligence.

2.1.1 Virtuosi.

2.1.2 Meeting your team.

2.1.3 Recruiting Programmers.

2.2 Outsourced Programmers.

2.2.1 Programmers in Their Environments.

2.2.2 Programmers, Cultures, and Teams.

2.3 Experienced Management.

2.3.1 Being Casual about Causal Relationships.

2.3.2 Not Learning From Experience.

2.3.3 Doing things right right now.

Chapter 3: Start with Open Source.

3.1 Process and Practice.

3.1.1 The 4Ps of Projects.

3.1.2 Agile Values.

3.1.3 Zero-point collaboration.

3.2 OSS Development.

3.2.1 Software Cloning.

3.2.2 Software Quality.

3.2.3 Starting Processes.

3.2.4 Open Source Development Community.

3.2.5 Ugrammers.

3.2.6 Participant Roles.

3.2.7 Rapid Release.

3.2.8 Black-box Programming.

3.2.9 Open Source Software Practices.

3.3 OOS-Like Development.

3.3.1 Agile Practices.

3.3.2 Communication Proximity.

3.3.3 Loose and Tight Couple.

3.3.4 Co-located OSS Development.

PART II: RHYTHMS.

Chapter 4: Plagiarism Programming.

4.1 Plagiarism.

4.1.1 Existing Code.

4.1.2 Social Network Analysis.

4.1.3 Being Plagiarized.

4.1.4 Turn everyone into a programmer.

4.1.5 Pattern Language.

4.1.6 Software Team Capability.

4.1.7 Rough-Cut Design.

4.1.8 Training is not a solution.

4.2 Nothing Faster than Plagiarism.

4.2.1 Immorality.

4.2.2 Unprecedented Code.

4.2.3 People Network.

4.2.4 Rhythm for Plagiarism.

4.2.5 Plagiarism at Work.

4.3 Business and Rhythm for Plagiarism.

4.3.1 15 Minute Business Presentation.

4.3.2 Marketing Research.

4.3.3 Chatting Robot.

4.3.4 Old Song New Singer.

Chapter 5: Pair Programming.

5.1 Art and Science.

5.1.1 The Right Partner.

5.1.2 Noisy Programming.

5.1.3 Just Training.

5.1.4 Pay to watch.

5.2 Two Worlds.

5.2.1 Moneyless World.

5.2.2 Money-led World.

5.2.3 Economics.

5.2.4 Mythical Quality-time.

5.2.5 Elapsed Time.

5.2.6 Critical Path Method.

5.2.7 Why two not three: Anti-Group.

5.2.8 Software Requirements are Puzzles.

5.3 Programming Task Demands.

5.3.1 2 and 4 is 6.

5.3.2 2 and 4 is 4.

5.3.3 2 and 4 is 3.

5.3.4 2 and 4 ≥ 2.

5.3.5 2 and 4 is unknown.

5.4 Pair programming is more than programming.

5.4.1 Design by Code.

5.4.2 Pair Design.

5.4.3 Rhythmic Pair Programming.

5.5 Pair programming Team Coached.

Chapter 6: Repeat Programming.

6.1 Controversies in Pair Programming.

6.1.1 Is Programming a Unique Work?

6.1.2 Are Three Minds Better Than Two?

6.1.3 Un-replicable Experiments.

6.2 Repeat Programming.

6.2.1 Variances.

6.2.2 Principles.

6.2.3 Triple Programming Unproductive.

6.3 Rhythm: Pair - Solo - Pair - Solo.

6.3.1 Persistence.

6.3.2 Connection.

6.3.3 Motivation.

6.4 An exception that proves Brooks’ Law.

6.4.1 Low Morale.

6.4.2 Communication Costs.

6.4.3 Rhythm for Late Projects.

Chapter 7: Agile Teaming.

7.1 Project Teams.

7.1.1 Self-organizing teams.

7.1.2 Teams in Team.

7.1.3 Project Team Composition.

7.1.4 Team Life Cycle vs. Learning Curve.

7.2 Productivity.

7.2.1 The Illusion of Productivity.

7.2.2 Collective Code Ownership.

7.2.3 Accountability, Responsibility and Transparency.

7.3 Problems and Problem Owners.

7.3.1 Rhythm: Trouble - Restructuring.

7.3.2 Teaming Principles.

7.4 Failing Projects Rescued.

7.4.1 Project Traffic Light.

7.4.2 A Business Case.

7.4.3 Steering Committee Meeting.

7.4.4 Agile Teaming in Action.

7.5 Beware of Iago.

Chapter 8: Incremental Design.

8.1 Modeling and Planning.

8.1.1 Agile Planning.

8.1.2 Design by Functional Modules.

8.1.3 Simple Design.

8.1.4 Total Cost Concept.

8.2 Rework or reuse.

8.2.1 Unpreventable Rework.

8.2.2 Improvisation.

8.2.3 Up-front Design.

8.3 Just-in-time Software Development.

8.3.1 The CMM Rhythm.

8.3.2 A Factory Tour.

8.3.3 Walking Worker.

8.3.4 Just-in-time Software Development.

8.3.5 Incremental Design.

8.4 Requirements Complexity.

8.4.1 Forgotten Requirements.

8.4.2 Conflicting Requirements.

8.4.3 Rapid Changing Requirements.

8.4.4 Requirements and Design.

8.5 Refactoring.

8.5.1 Refactoring Activities.

8.5.2 Refactoring by Challenging.

8.5.3 Refactoring for Design Patterns.

8.5.4 Making Deliberate Mistakes.

Chapter 9: Test-Driven Development.

9.1 Reverse Waterfall.

9.1.1 Design - Code - Test.

9.1.2 Test - Code - Design.

9.2 Test-First Programming.

9.2.1 Testing and Verification.

9.2.2 Break-point testing.

9.2.3 Supporting Practices.

9.3 Rhythm: Test - Code - Refactor.

9.3.1 Simple Example.

9.3.2 Automation.

9.3.3 Revolution in Consciousness!

9.3.4 Test Case for Collaboration.

9.4 Rapid Software Process Improvement.

9.4.1 Training Program.

9.4.2 Project Planning.

9.4.3 Project Tracking.

9.4.4 Software Quality.

9.4.5 Software Configuration.

9.4.6 People Discipline.

Epilogue: Medley.

Appendix I: Nammik.

References.

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

"It is full of case studies, anecdotes, and exercises, all illustrated with clever, yet instructive cartoons." (Ubiquity, June 10-16, 2008)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews