Something Red: A Novel

Something Red: A Novel

by Douglas Nicholas
3.6 9

Paperback(Reprint)

$11.36 $16.00 Save 29% Current price is $11.36, Original price is $16. You Save 29%.
View All Available Formats & Editions
Eligible for FREE SHIPPING
  • Get it by Wednesday, September 27 ,  Order by 12:00 PM Eastern and choose Expedited Delivery during checkout.
    Same Day delivery in Manhattan. 
    Details

Overview

Something Red: A Novel by Douglas Nicholas

From debut novelist Douglas Nicholas comes a haunting fantasy of love, murder, and sorcery set in one of the coldest winters of thirteenth-century England.

In an intoxicating blend of fantasy and horror, acclaimed debut novel Something Red transports you to the harsh, unforgiving world of thirteenth-century England. An evil and age-old force stalks the countryside—who dares confront it?

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781451660227
Publisher: Atria/Emily Bestler Books
Publication date: 06/18/2013
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 315
Sales rank: 1,264,464
Product dimensions: 5.30(w) x 8.20(h) x 0.80(d)

About the Author

Douglas Nicholas is an award-winning poet, whose work has appeared in numerous poetry journals, and the author of four previous books, including Something Red and Iron Rose, a collection of poems inspired by New York City. He lives in New York’s Hudson Valley with his wife Theresa and Yorkshire terrier Tristan.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Something Red 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
tamsparks More than 1 year ago
Douglas Nicholas is a master storyteller and has the rare skill of being able gradually build a sense of dread and terror in such a way that it virtually sneaks up on the reader. This is a rather quiet story that relies not on big action scenes, but on an irresistible mix of wonderful characters and carefully constructed moments that add up to an amazing reading experience. Set in thirteenth century England during an especially nasty winter, Molly and her band of friends are trying to cross a mountain pass with their wagons ahead of the impending heavy snows. Molly is an Irish woman of indeterminate age who brews potions and is able to communicate with crows. Her travelling companions are granddaughter Nemain (pronounced “Nevan”), a young girl in her teens who helps Molly make her concoctions and is able to sense danger; Jack, Molly’s lover and protector, a mysterious and silent man who is not able to speak but is a strong and passionate defender; and Hob, Molly’s thirteen-year-old apprentice whose main job is caring for the ox that pulls Molly’s wagon. The story is told in third person mostly from Hob’s point of view and takes place in a monastery, an inn, and a castle, as the troupe battles their way from place to place in the terrible winter snows that are gradually getting worse. As they make their way through the dark and snowy woods between each location, the feeling that something is stalking them is keenly felt by everyone in the troupe. And when the danger becomes real and horribly mutilated bodies begin to turn up, Molly and Jack come up with a dangerous plan to save those who are still alive. My favorite part of Something Red was the characters. Molly, the leader of the group, has an almost mythic quality about her. She’s a woman who can seemingly do anything (throw knives, win at chess, heal the dying). Fiercely devoted to Molly, Jack is a larger-than-life character with an intriguing back story that eventually emerges later in the book, and also explains why he is mute. Not only does he defend Molly, Nemain and Hob against the various dangers they encounter, but the author injects a touch of bawdiness into the story when describing his prowess in bed. But of all the characters, I loved Hob the most. At its core, this is a coming-of-age story, and Hob goes through many changes before emerging a man at the end. One of his most endearing features is his love for Milo the ox, who also loves him back and will do anything Hob asks of him. Any coming-of-age story worth its salt wouldn’t be complete without first love, and Nicholas makes sure Hob experiences love and desire for the first time, but in a controlled and subtle way. Like the looming horrors in the snow, Hob’s awareness of his desire seems to grow alongside the terror, as he experiences the pain and confusion of first love. Eventually Molly and her troupe are able to put a name to the evil and confront it, in a wonderfully surprising way. Nicholas brings in several shady characters later in the story who could be responsible for the horrific killings, but he keeps the reader guessing almost to the end. In the final pages as Hob makes the transition from child to adult, the snow begins to melt and winter turns to spring. I had goose bumps as I read the final page and longed to know that thing all writers want their readers to feel at the end of a story: What Happens Next.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Something Red" is a beautifully written, patiently drawn, mood-filled literary thriller. It's not outright scary, but one could classify it as horror. It's not a straight out mystery, though poet-turned-novelist Douglas Nicholas drafts an expectant, slow-boil whodunit. "Something Red" centers on a small band of travelers winding their way through northern England at the earliest onsets of winter. The story is told through the eyes of Hob, a young orphan in the care of Molly, a world-wise woman who's equally as skilled with a bow, as she is with the medicinal powders and elixirs she keeps in her wagon. Molly's granddaughter Nemain and the silent, brooding and terrifically strong Jack, flesh out Molly's troupe. Nicholas uses his remarkable linguistic skill to build his plot and shape his characters, slowly like the earliest bubbles within a pot coming to boil. The story thread develops patiently, always on the verge of exposing an important clue, always promising to unlock a key riddle in a characters' development. This following quote not only describes a scene midway through the book, but aptly describes the reading experience itself. "Life with Molly's troupe was a constant procession of revelations...like suddenly stumbling upon an old Roman road in the midst of thick forest. Questions rose to his lips, so many that his thoughts became too tangled to choose one." There's a supernatural element to the story, but it's subtle and suggestive, and not fully explored until the final 75 pages or so. The dark and purposefully trudging plot persistently pulls the reader towards an inevitable peak - supernatural, but realistic and very human in its portrayals of emotions and motivations. Nicholas serves the story like a feast of accents. The core narrative is written in a form of middle-age English, but the various characters are written with both soft and hard Irish brogues, peasant medieval English, and a heavily accented Eastern European. So wonderfully epic in his storytelling, Douglas establishes a broad mythology that hints at the possibilities of a sequel. If a monastery, forest inn and castle form the backdrop for the expositional narrative, then the building pressure and promise of snow and its eventual release in an monster blizzard provides its voice. A great autumn or winter read, I wanted to step away from my reading nook and find a snowy forest dell to envelope myself further within this tale. But not too far. As Hob asks from within the confortable and warm confines of an English castle: "What could harm us here? What could reach us here?" Much. And more.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
eternalised More than 1 year ago
Something Red is a lyrical, descriptive book, reminiscent of The Name of The Rose. It’s not too bad, but the plot doesn’t offer anything fresh, and the writing is so lyrical it slows down the pace. There are too many descriptions, and the plot drags along. I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
ElegantlyBoundReviews More than 1 year ago
This book is very very slow.