Spunk and Bite: A Writer's Guide to Bold, Contemporary Style

Spunk and Bite: A Writer's Guide to Bold, Contemporary Style

by Arthur Plotnik

Paperback(Reprint)

$16.20 $18.00 Save 10% Current price is $16.2, Original price is $18. You Save 10%.
View All Available Formats & Editions
Choose Expedited Shipping at checkout for guaranteed delivery by Tuesday, February 25
MARKETPLACE
33 New & Used Starting at $1.99

Overview

Today's writer needs more than just a solid knowledge of usage and composition to write successfully. Bestselling author Arthur Plotnik reveals the secrets to attention-grabbing, unforgettable writing, in this trade paperback edition.

Updated with all-new writing exercises, Spunk & Bite will help writers take books, articles, business reports, memos, and even e-mail messages to the next level.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780375722271
Publisher: Diversified Publishing
Publication date: 05/08/2007
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 288
Sales rank: 530,365
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.24(h) x 0.71(d)

About the Author

Arthur Plotnik is a former publishing executive and author of the Book of the Month Club selections The Elements of Editing and The Elements of Expression: Putting Thoughts into Words.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Spunk and Bite: A Writer's Guide to Bold, Contemporary Style 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
bah_bah_black_sheep-mh More than 1 year ago
I loved this book. From the satiric, play-on-words title, to Plotnik's unorthodox way of explaining writing, this book reads exactly as the title says: it explains how to write with style, humor, and originality. It cites examples of such style from nonfiction, fiction, poetry, plays, etc., and explains how they come about using their unique style--unique word choice, unusual similes and metaphors, liberal punctuation, humor in words, to name a few. I've even used the "liberal" writing style in my school essays, and I've never been marked off for it. This book is a must for any serious writer.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Not your standard 'elements of style.' This book takes old school train of thought and teaches that it's okay to break the rules sometimes. I felt relieved many times while reading this, especially pertaining to my own personal use of adverbs. He quotes many great authors - including a few old school classics - where the 'rules of style' are broken. The title truly fits the essence of the book.
ablueidol on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
You want to write a Blog, an article¿ oh anything in public in fact, well in the USA you have to deal with the style police. In Britain, they are known as the green ink grannies and are gently ignored; we don¿t do earnest. Well we almost did with A Dictionary of Modern English Usage, by Henry Watson Fowler which suggested about the split infinitive that the¿English-speaking world may be divided into (1) those who neither know nor care what a split infinitive is; (2) those who do not know, but care very much; (3) those who know and condemn; (4) those who know and approve; and (5) those who know and distinguish.Thankfully this was by the 80¿s revised away from prescriptive American style policing so we are free to keep to the high standards of writing where expression is more important then style. Hmm, may have to come back to this.But write in America and you judged by the book of truth, the book of righteous writing, the book correctness which all Americans know as The Elements of Style. Its roots go back to 1918 where William Strunk, Jr. wrote a 43-page booklet for the good students of Cornell University. And like all sensible guide for students was mainly ignored. But then in 1957, E.B.White, one of the top 20th century literary essayists (and yes author of Charlotte¿s Webb) wrote a piece praising the now largely forgotten William Strunk defence of lucid English. This led to the first edition that originally detailed eight elementary rules of usage, ten elementary principles of composition, "a few matters of form," and a list of commonly misused words and expressions. By the 80¿s and the 3rd edition, this had bloated up to Fifty-four pointers, along with a list of common mistakes concerning individual words: Eleven rules of punctuation and grammar; eleven principles of writing; eleven matters of form; and twenty-one reminders for a better style. What Spunk and Bite by Arthur Plotnik (yes we get the pun but in Britain, you have now managed to create an embarrassed silence where we pretend not to have heard you) does is to challenge the prescription of dead white upper class Americans without arguing for do you own thing writing-see told you I would come back to it. To liven your writing, you need to know the rules, but then know when to break them. Be lucid but be fun and avoid at all times clichés except if they warm the cockles of your readers¿ heart. One of the tips I have taken up is to subscribe to various words of the day to build up my wordbank. Two of my rave faves are vindictivolence, the desire of revenging oneself, and pinkwashing. This is using support for breast cancer research to market products, particularly products that cause cancer. All in all it comes up with 30 tips to sparkle up your writing that range from inventing words, changing the grammatical function of a word , having strong openings and closings, use semi-colons and dashes to break up sentence but above keeping in mind that the writing needs to make the content interesting.Let¿s leave the final words to Arthur Plotnik:Perceived correctness can be comforting to the reader, like a tidy house. But what distinguishes a piece of writing is the ambiance- the environmental mood- the language we create¿tend to be judged on¿aptness, inventiveness, colour, sound, rhythm¿Spunk and Bite is our shorthand for such qualities¿
Anonymous More than 1 year ago