Storm Warning (Mage Storms Series #1)

Storm Warning (Mage Storms Series #1)

by Mercedes Lackey

Paperback(Mass Market Paperback - Reissue)

$9.99 View All Available Formats & Editions
Choose Expedited Shipping at checkout for guaranteed delivery by Thursday, October 24

Overview

With her phenomenal Mage Winds trilogy, bestselling author Mercedes Lackey captivated fans across the country. Now in the first volume of the series sequel, she continues the same storyline, returning readers to a war-torn Valdemar in preparation to confront an ancient Eastern Empire--ruled by a monarch whose magical tactics by be beyond any sorcery known to the western kingdoms.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780886776619
Publisher: DAW
Publication date: 09/01/1995
Series: Valdemar: Mage Storms Series , #1
Edition description: Reissue
Pages: 432
Sales rank: 190,714
Product dimensions: 4.17(w) x 6.74(h) x 1.14(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Mercedes Lackey is a full-time writer and has published numerous novels and works of short fiction, including the best-selling Heralds Of Valdemar series. She is also a professional lyricist and a licensed wild bird rehabilitator. She lives in Oklahoma with her husband, artist Larry Dixon, and their flock of parrots. She can be found at mercedeslackey.com.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Storm Warning (Mage Storms Series #1) 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 77 reviews.
Lisa_RR_H More than 1 year ago
If you're trying to decide to buy this book, I think it comes down to two questions. If you're new to Lackey or the Valdemar books, should you start here? For me that's a decisive no. Go back and at try Arrows of the Queen, and if you like that, finish Talia's trilogy and move on to Elspeth's story beginning in Winds of Fate. OK, so you've read those? Then the question becomes, do you want to continue on and invest in this trilogy? I'd say yes. I didn't like this trilogy as much as the other Valdemar published before this one: the two trilogies spoken of above and Vanyel's story, my favorite, that begins with Magic's Pawn. But if you've come this far, yes, this is like visiting with old friends and making new ones. I liked seeing Valdemar from an outside, and particularly Karsite perspective, that of their traditional enemies. Karal provides that outside perspective, and he's an appealing character that propelled me nicely through the book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I liked this book, and I think that you need to know the other books of the Valdemar series well to appreciate this book and the information that it has. It gives good insight on the country of Karse, Valdemar's long-time enemy. You learn a lot about Vkandis, the Karstite God, and drops hints about other important things. It is important to read the Valdemar series (I know it's a lot of books, but do it anyways), but most important read the Mage Wars and the Mage Winds. One more thing that I like is that Mercedes Lackey is not putting this book in the perspective of a mage or a Herald, or anyone that has real power. She puts the main character as a secretary, and you learn that you don't have to have godly powers or authority to do something great.
jjmcgaffey on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I wanted to read about Tremane, but the story really starts here, although this book is mostly Karal and An'desha. Tremane is established as a character, put in place, and takes a couple actions (some of which have far-reaching effects), but doesn't really develop in Warning. Karal and An'desha both do a heck of a lot of growing up in here, though. An'desha does most of his in one burst at the end - a single confrontation and a long walk (described from the outside) through his oldest memories, and he goes from submissive and regularly panicky to adult and independent. Though Karal's and Ulrich's work with him before certainly laid the groundwork, we don't really see him from the inside (no scenes from his POV) after he starts to develop. And for that matter, he may not be as grown-up as he acts at the end of the book. Karal is certainly _acting_ grown-up by the end of the book, but since most of the latter half is from his POV we know exactly how fragile and unprepared he feels while he's doing his grown-up act. On the other hand, he does develop, both in behavior and in feelings, throughout the book - at the beginning he's a very naive boy, who suffers a lot of major shocks to his worldview and incorporates them as he develops. From Rubrik to his homesickness, from the gryphons to Altra, from working with An'desha to the disaster near the end (not saying what, that's a spoiler), Karal deals with what he learns and makes it part of his new worldview. Even if he does have a habit of thinking something's a dream until it's forcibly shown otherwise.... And at the end, he hangs on and does what's needed to provide an immediate solution. He still thinks of himself as a stand-in (in which attitude he persists in the next book, as I recall), but his actions are those of a responsible adult. Nice to see! Oh yeah, and there's minor matters like an invasion of Hardorn that might not stop at the border, the beginning of the Mage Storms that the entire trilogy is about, building alliance and friendship between two long-term enemies...little stuff like that going on in the background while all this character development is happening. It's really funny what catches my attention from reading to reading.
surreality on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Plot: The book doesn't go anywhere, it's a solid 400 pages of set-up and retelling of what's happened before, which makes for relatively boring reading. There are three main plots centered around a group of characters each; one of these plots fails to achieve anything but premonition, the other two are a coming-of-age and coming-into-power-against-adversity respectively. Characters: The most interesting character is the one who isn't using magic or magical creatures, but who has to rely on his wits and the loyalty of his men. The second new addition makes for a nice, if very ham-fistedly executed growth from insecurity to slightly less insecurity and an overcoming of prejudices. Established characters, unfortunately, are denied development and feel very boring. Style: There's a limit to how much exposition a book needs. There's also a limit to how much angst a character should go through before he becomes a complete drama queen. The story never builds up much atmosphere and it's painfully obvious that we're here to get facts for the next books, and not much else. Plus: Tremane. Finally someone with a brain, without any romantic notions, without love interests and without a predilection to talk to mystic beings. Minus: too much jumping in between plots without those plots actually going anywhere. Summary: While this is counted as the first book of a trilogy, it's essentially book four of a six-volume tale. And a rather unnecessary book at that.
LisaMaria_C on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
If you're trying to decide to buy this book, I think it comes down to two questions. If you're new to Lackey or the Valdemar books, should you start here? For me that's a decisive no. Go back and at try Arrows of the Queen, and if you like that, finish Talia's trilogy and move on to Elspeth's story beginning in Winds of Fate. OK, so you've read those two trilogies? Then the question becomes, do you want to continue on and invest in this trilogy? I'd say yes. I didn't like this trilogy as much as the other Valdemar books published before this one: the two trilogies spoken of above and Vanyel's story, my favorite, that begins with Magic's Pawn. But if you've come this far, yes, this is like visiting with old friends and making new ones. I liked seeing Valdemar from an outside, and particularly Karsite perspective, that of their traditional enemies. Karal provides that outside perspective, and he's an appealing character that propelled me nicely through the book.
SunnySD on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
With Hardorn in shambles and the invading army of the Eastern Empire chomping large bites out of the stricken kingdom, Valedemar is threatened, as is neighboring Karse. Traditional enemies, the two countries are beginning delicate negotiations toward a lasting alliance. Sun-priest Ulrich and his alcolyte Karal are Solaris chosen representatives, and are settling in well when calamity strikes - waves of disorienting and dangerous magic are sweeping the world. If Valdemar and her allies are to survive drastic measures will be needed.A great first entry. Looking forward to re-reading the rest of the trilogy.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Horrid grammatical mistakes on ebook version
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have read this before and enjoyed it again.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
There were some glaring mistakes, but overall a great story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
An absolute read. I love the characters and any Lackey fan will not be disapointed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago