Stranger in the Room (Keye Street Series #2)

Stranger in the Room (Keye Street Series #2)

by Amanda Kyle Williams
4.1 21

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Stranger in the Room: A Novel 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 21 reviews.
myreadS More than 1 year ago
When Keye Street's cousin Miki needs help, Keye takes her in (albeit against her better judgement). Miki has been in self-destruct mode for most of her life. She's heard odd noises and feels she's been watched for a few years though all the 911 calls she's made has only resulted in the APD considering Miki a bit of a nutcase. Now there'd been a man. In her house! Miki saw him! Well, yes, she'd been out partying, drinking and, well, whatever - but she heard someone inside and saw his outline in the window! Keye has a friend in the APD and the second book in the Dr Keye Street (ex-FBI behavioral analyst turned PI and occasional police consultant)/Lt Aaron Rauser (APD major crimes) series. Along the way Keye works as a bail bond recovery agent and also takes a job investigating how dry cement mixed with a little chicken feed wound up in an urn (as opposed to a loved one's cremains) in Big Knob, Alabama. Readers of the first book in this series will dive right in. This also works well as a stand alone. There is enough background sprinkled in to flesh out the characters, it is done in a way that doesn't interfere with or slow down the story's progression. Readers are in for another wild ride as Keye pieces together a profile of a killer while dealing with her cousin, mother, the press, sobriety, a questionable crematorium, a few street thugs, Neil and Atlanta's summer weather. The only disappointment this book will bring is that there isn't a book three resting at the top of my 'read me next' pile. Enjoy the book. I won this book on Goodreads.
lindyLW More than 1 year ago
This book was better than her first if that was possible. You can`t stop reading, I was up till 4am. Everytime you turn around some thing new comes up and you can`t put it down. I can`t wait for her next one
Ladystorm More than 1 year ago
Stranger in the Room is a suspenseful crime novel and the first book I have read by this author. I really enjoyed reading this book as it was very entertaining and the characters felt real. The debut novel by this author was called The Stranger You Seek and this is where the reader is introduced to Keye Streets. I had not read the first book and I didn't really feel that off while reading the second book, there was a lot of mention to what had previously happened to Keye and Rauser so that you can get an idea of what the first book was about. Keye is a recovering alcoholic and she use to work for the FBI but now she is a Private Detective who sometimes helps the APD with cases because her boyfriend Rauser works there as a Lieutenant. You get the feeling that she is not really over what happened to her from the previous book, it was a big case and both her and Rauser were injured. She works with Neil her computer guy and they also take on a little work from Tyrone a bail bondsman. When her cousin Miki calls she really doesn't believer her when she said there was a man in her house. Miki has a really big drug and alcohol problem and it is hard for Keye's to be around her, but she also feels sorry for her. Then things get heated up and she finds out that Miki really does have someone after her and now that some is after Keyes too. Keye's is a strong character with flaws that people can relate too, its nice to have heroines with flaws, but yet still tough. Rauser sounds very handsome and caring. He is older than Keyes, as she teases him about it all the time. He has been a cop for a long time and though I am not sure how long they have been together (I advise reading the first book), they really seem to work well together. They are both emotionally stressed from the previous big case they worked on and they poor a lot of themselves into the cases they work on. Rauser is working on a case involving a teen age all star who was murdered and as things progress they find out that some how is teenage murder and Miki and the things happening with her are linked though it really seems odd. Rauser is very protective of Keyes you can tell her really cares a lot about her and you really just can't help but like him. All the characters in the book even the side characters like Neil and Tyrone are really likable. I am sure that if the author continues books with Keyes that we will get to know the side characters more and they will grow on me even more. The only thing that kept me from giving this book a five star was the fact that it really took me longer than I like to get into a novel. For me it took until they find the body in Miki's house for it to really grab my interest and from then on I was hooked. Because Keyes is a PI and helps Rauser there are a lot of different things going on and it has a lot of side cases that takes you away from the main case and it was okay but sometimes it just feels like to much detail and filler. I can't say I am totally in love with the cover but it does make it look suspenseful. Over all, I really enjoyed this book and will be on the look out for any more books from this author especial if they involve Keye and Rauser. If you are a crime fiction fan then I would suggest this book!
Teritree001971at More than 1 year ago
STRANGER IN THE ROOM is one in a mystery series involving Keye Street, PI. The main character at one time worked for the FBI in their behavioral analysis department, but thanks to her drinking, lost the position and is now working as a PI/bounty hunter in the deep south. At this point, Street is a recovering alcoholic with a big chip on her shoulder. If you like Jessie Stone, chances are you will enjoy this mystery series also. Keye is an American of Chinese descent living in Atlanta, Ga with a cat named White Trash. She is far from perfect and at times I just wanted to shake her and tell her to stop her whining and feeling sorry for herself. That is how well written this story is. It manages to capture the readers attention and keep them focused on the pages around them. Although the main focus begins with one serial killer, Keye ends up exposing two different serial murder cases. You never know what is happening until the end sneaks up on you. The author adequately describes the circumstances keeping the reader engaged and focused on where she wants him to be in the story. At one point, you are walking with Keye in the woods and you want to be anywhere except where you are at that moment. Another time, you find yourself laughing when she manages to capture a bail jumper and ends up on you tube. If you like Jessie Stone, definitely give this one a try.
Linda__ More than 1 year ago
I loved this book. It's a well written, intelligent mystery. The characters are flawed and feel real. I loved the first book in the series and thought this one was even better. I'm looking forward to the third in the series and will buy it as soon as it's released.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hard to find a really good story and plot. I liked it and I think you will too. New to this author but will be reading more. Kat
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I absolutely love the characters in this book, especially Keye. Filled with humor and solving crimes. Quite a mix of emotions. Wish it never ended.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am impresed with the story line and the characters. Well written and wee worth the time! Downside? There are only 3 books in this series right now!!!! Good stuff!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is almost a good book, but fails in too many ways to enumerate. First of all, enough with the alcoholic detectives. So tired, so worn. No one at all cares about some disgraced former profiler's sobriety, and what kind of hick town do you think Atlanta is, that the media shouts out that question when first told about a serial killer? Ridiculous. That's another big problem with this book. I get that in the protagonist's head, everything is about her. This would certainly not be the case for the rest of the world, however, and the author doesn't seem to get how unimportant this chick would be to virtually everyone. Most impotant, however, is the pat way the author makes all Keye's wild guesses come absolutely true (profiling is not going to tell you someone definitely has a dog, for example), and always makes her the physical hero in every situation. Honey, you cannot make your heroine a very petite girl and expect us to believe she can flyaround dodging bullets and haul large men to safety. Sbe never actually NEEDS the backup she calls for, pulling a gun she wouldn't even be able to handle out and blowing much larger people away in the middle of a strugggle. Atlanta PD is completely extraneous here; none of them come up with any answers or fight the bad guy, it's all the short girl. And they embrace her help too. Riiiight.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
well worth your time, especially if you've read the first in the series.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Kept me guessing all the way through
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Off or never got on alcoholic or plain drunk drug taker or binge eater or shopper or dysfunctional family or psycho problems that clog up the story with their angst angst angst worse these are repeated as fill ins with every book color is one thing but am tired of case histories eccentric also goes a long way as a seasoning a pinch rather than a tablespoon give this a borrow not buy as is not a re read
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
There are a lot of good things to say about Amanda Kyle Williams' books. Her protagonist has depth, sense of humor and a good sense of personal irony and insight. The writing is crisp and engaging, and plot lines are interesting and well executed. My only complaint, and it isn't insignificant, is that I wish she had a better sense, as a white woman writing a person of color character, of racism and race politics. It just isn't okay, for instance, to make her character Keye Street apologize for her reaction to a full on southern racist who treats her with utter disrespect, as though this were some glib 'it takes two to tango' interaction. It was not. Nor is it okay to have her observe that everyone at a ball game is white and then dismiss a patronizing comment from her white boyfriend that he doesn't see race anymore because he's evolved past that, as just his "bad manners" which are more than made up for because he's so dreamy. Seriously? Ms. Williams is going to dig a little deeper to widen her understanding in this area, if as I read, she truly wants to be of support to her Asian-American niece as this young girl brokers her way through racist America. Because this kind of facile, 'we're all one' stuff is not going to be her experience, and this kind of attitude is a real unfortunate sour note in what is otherwise excellent writing.
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LoveToReadJFE More than 1 year ago
First and foremost, the author really needs to re-think those super-snarky comments related to real-life people. Every time I came to one of them, I had to restrain my impulse to throw the book across the room. Presumably they’re meant to be funny, but they’re not . . . and they make her seem just plain mean. Keye Street is the central character in “Stranger in the Room.” She’s a flawed and occasionally-funny ex-FBI profiler, currently a private investigator who consults for the Atlanta police. The southern settings are exquisite, perfectly described and one of the highlights of the author’s writing. While I mostly liked the characters, they often had an unfortunate tendency to be one-dimensional and to behave in perfectly predictable ways. Miki wasn’t at all a sympathetic victim, making it difficult to care about the outcome of the story the author wanted to tell. It seemed to be a reasonable assumption that Keye would save the day in the end, but when she did just that, Miki’s response made her so unlikeable that I really didn’t care that she had been rescued. The recovering alcoholic descriptions got very old very fast, mostly because they seemed far too repetitive and just a bit too blatant. The author’s decision to include two major mystery/crime elements is rather baffling. Either one of them alone would have been perfect and the book would have been tighter if the author had chosen just one as her focus and then really delved into it. The mere fact that Keye was involved in both investigations was far too slim a connecting thread to make the two divergent stories dovetail in any meaningful way. The biggest problem I had with the book was that it was far too easy to set it aside in favor of reading something else; I simply didn’t care enough about any of the characters and the telling of the tale wasn’t compelling enough to keep me reading and involved in the story being told.