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The Terrible Troll-Bird
     

The Terrible Troll-Bird

by Ingri d'Aulaire, Edgar d'Aulaire
 

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One summer’s eve Ola, Lina, Sina, and Trina leave their village to gather firewood in the forest, when they’re surprised by the hideous call of the terrible troll-bird, a giant rooster who pops up out of the treetops and swoops down to devour their beloved horse Blakken. Little does the terrible troll-bird know that in Ola, Lina, Sina, and Trina he has

Overview

One summer’s eve Ola, Lina, Sina, and Trina leave their village to gather firewood in the forest, when they’re surprised by the hideous call of the terrible troll-bird, a giant rooster who pops up out of the treetops and swoops down to devour their beloved horse Blakken. Little does the terrible troll-bird know that in Ola, Lina, Sina, and Trina he has finally met his match: his terrible days of terrorizing are over. Before long the whole village is celebrating the monster’s demise, and even the gnomes and hulder-maidens are coming out of their hiding places in the woods to participate in a great feast. All celebration is cut short, though, with the startling appearance of two monstrous moss-grown trolls even more terrible than the terrible troll-bird himself. Luckily, the children rise to the occasion once more, saving the day before they set out on a splendid new adventure.

Filled with vibrant illustrations and telling a story of childhood ingenuity and bravery, The Terrible Troll-Bird is a delightful companion to Ingri and Edgar Parin d’Aulaire’s more comprehensive books of Norwegian folklore, D’Aulaires’ Book of Norse Myths and D’Aulaires’ Book of Trolls.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“The d’Aulaires have…created magical, luminous illustrations that capture the humor of this Norwegian folk tale.” –School Library Journal

"Another standard from the Caldecott Award–winning d'Aulaires, The Terrible Troll-Bird (also first published in 1955), tells how a group of Norwegian villagers defeated the titular avian (effectively a huge rooster intent on stealing livestock) and its owners, a pair of nasty trolls." —Publishers Weekly

“The d’Aulaires were, of course, the singularly gifted author-illustrators, creators, by the score, of timeless children’s books…a number of their books…are still in print, classics that make for perfect gifts each and every year.” –Smithsonian Magazine

Children's Literature - Beverley Fahey
The D'Aulaires' fantastic tale about a terrible rooster that wreaks havoc on the people of a Norwegian valley is as enjoyable today as when it was first printed in 1955. Four children and their horse Blakken first encounter the huge bird in the forest, where they have gone to collect firewood. The troll bird desires to carry off Blakken, but the children and their trusty blunderbuss quickly dispatch the threatening creature. Horses, goats, cows, sheep, and even pigs drag the rooster to a farm where it is roasted. Its meat feeds the whole valley, and its feathers fill countless pillows and coverlets. The aroma of the roasting bird lures two trolls, Gygra and Jotun, to the valley; they turn their anger on the people who lived there. Once again, the clever children have the solution. They trick the trolls into staying until the sun rises. At that time, the trolls turn to stone and burst into thousands of pieces. Once again, peace returns to the valley. Ola, Lina, Sina, and Trina make a sturdy boat from the troll bird's beak and set sail for new adventure. The rich Scandinavian folklore is the basis for this tale that is refreshingly nostalgic in style and language and celebrates the bravery and ingenuity of the children. The D'Aulaires signature artistic style of alternating black-and-white sketches and three-color prints moves the story along. This should be standard fare for most libraries, and it should be a first purchase for home libraries seeking to have a foundation of classics. Reviewer: Beverley Fahey

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590172520
Publisher:
New York Review Books
Publication date:
09/18/2007
Series:
New York Review Children's Collection Series
Pages:
52
Sales rank:
593,391
Product dimensions:
9.15(w) x 12.41(h) x 0.43(d)
Age Range:
5 - 9 Years

Meet the Author

Edgar Parin d'Aulaire (1898—1986) studied art in Germany and France, and worked with Henri Matisse. In Munich, he met Ingri Mortenson (1904—1980), a Norwegian-born art student. They married, emigrated to the US, and began a long career together, during which they published over twenty picture books for children. The Magic Rug was followed by Ola and East of the Sun and West of the Moon, both of which describe Norwegian folklore. Their work shifted to American history with Abraham Lincoln, a biography which won the 1940 Caldecott Medal. The d'Aulaires were awarded the Regina Medal from the Catholic Library Association in 1970.

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