The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

by Mark Twain

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Overview

The classic boyhood adventure tale, updated with a new introduction by noted Mark Twain scholar R. Kent Rasmussen. Nominated as one of America’s best-loved novels by PBS’s The Great American Read

A consummate prankster with a quick wit, Tom Sawyer dreams of a bigger fate than simply being a “rich boy.” Yet through the novel’s humorous escapades—from the famous episode of the whitewashed fence to the trial of Injun Joe—Mark Twain explores the deeper themes of the adult world, one of dishonesty and superstition, murder and revenge, starvation and slavery.

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.


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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9798718919653
Publisher: Independently published
Publication date: 05/03/2021
Pages: 190
Product dimensions: 5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range: 7 - 9 Years

About the Author

Mark Twain (1835–1910) was born Samuel Langhorne Clemens in Florida, Missouri. Starting out as typesetter, he went on to work as a steamboat pilot, prospector, and journalist before publishing his first major book, The Innocents Abroad.

R. Kent Rasmussen is the author or editor of nine books on Mark Twain, including the award-winning Mark Twain A to Z, as well as more than a dozen other books. He lives in Southern California.

Date of Birth:

November 30, 1835

Date of Death:

April 21, 1910

Place of Birth:

Florida, Missouri

Place of Death:

Redding, Connecticut

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1
(Continues…)



Excerpted from "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer"
by .
Copyright © 2017 Mark Twain.
Excerpted by permission of Penguin Young Readers Group.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

Contents
Introduction
  1. Tom Plays, Fights, and Hides
  2. The Glorious Whitewasher
  3. Busy at War and Love
  4. Showing Off in Sunday School
  5. The Pinch Bug and His Prey
  6. Tom Meets Becky
  7. Tick-Running and a Heartbreak
  8. A Pirate Bold to Be
  9. Tragedy in the Graveyard
  10. Dire Prophecy of the Howling Dog
  11. Conscience Racks Tom
  12. The Cat and the Painkiller
  13. The Pirate Crew Set Sail
  14. Happy Camp of the Freebooters
  15. Tom's Stealthy Visit Home
  16. First Pipes — "I've Lost My Knife"
  17. Pirates at Their Own Funeral
  18. Tom Reveals His Dream Secret
  19. The Cruelty of "I Didn't Think"
  20. Tom Takes Becky's Punishment
  21. Eloquence — and the Master's Gilded Dome
  22. Huck Finn Quotes Scripture
  23. The Salvation of Muff Potter
  24. Splendid Days and Fearsome Nights
  25. Seeking the Buried Treasure
  26. Real Robbers Seize the Box of Gold
  27. Trembling on the Trail
  28. In the Lair of Injun Joe
  29. Huck Saves the Widow
  30. Tom and Becky in the Cave
  31. Found and Lost Again
  32. "Turn Out! They're Found!"
  33. The Fate of Injun Joe
  34. Floods of Gold
  35. Respectable Huck Joins the Gang
    Literary Allusions and Notes
    Critical Excerpts
    Mark Twain on The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
    Suggestions for Further Reading

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

"Twain had a greater effect than any other writer on the evolution of American prose."

Reading Group Guide

1. In his preface, Mark Twain remarks that "Although my book is intended mainly for the entertainment of boys and girls, I hope it will not be shunned by men and women on that account, for part of my plan has been to try to pleasantly remind adults of what they once were themselves. . . ." Do you think Twain succeeds in this "plan"? Discuss the ways in which Tom Sawyer can be read by both children and adults-do different aspects of the book appeal to different kinds of readers? Are different episodes designed, as some critics have suggested, to appeal to different audiences?

2. How does Tom Sawyer relate to the world of adult authority and responsibility? Can he be said to "mature" during the course of the novel, as critics have asserted? If so in what ways?

3. Discuss the town of St. Petersburg, Missouri, Tom Sawyer's home. How would you describe it? What literary devices or descriptions, to your mind, make Twain's portrayal of rural American life in the years before the Civil War interesting, unique, appealing?

4. Virginia Wexman notes that in Tom Sawyer "we are confronted with two clearly separate worlds. The first world is a light and engaging one . . . where life is played at . . . the world of Tom himself. . . . But there is another world here too, a darker world where actions have real meaning and real moral consequences-the world of people like Injun Joe and Muff Potter." Discuss each of these "two worlds," and the ways in which they are related to each other in the novel.

5. Discuss Tom's relationship with Huckleberry Finn, from their first encounter, through their subsequent adventures. What do you make of this friendship? Why are these characters drawn to each other? Compare this relationship with other relationships in the novel, for instance Tom's relationship to Becky Thatcher.

6. Discuss Twain's use of particular geographical settings as scenes for episodes in the novel: the river, the island, the cave. Why do you think these particular landscapes are chosen? How do they inform the action of the novel?

7. Tom Sawyer is one of the most recognizable and revered characters in American literature; as Lyall Powers writes, "Everybody knows Tom's story whether he has actually read the book or not." What do you think accounts for the enduring popularity of Twain's literary creation?

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