The Lost Diary of Don Juan: A Novel

The Lost Diary of Don Juan: A Novel

by Douglas Carlton Abrams

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781416532521
Publisher: Washington Square Press
Publication date: 07/01/2008
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 336
Product dimensions: 5.30(w) x 8.30(h) x 1.00(d)

About the Author

Douglas Carlton Abrams is the nationally bestselling author of The Lost Diary of Don Juan, which has been published in thirty languages. He writes fact-based fiction and did extensive research for his new novel, including swimming with and recording humpback whales, meeting present-day whalers, and cage diving with great white sharks. Previously an editor at the University at California Press and HarperCollins, he is the cofounder of Idea Architects, a book and media development agency.

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One: Rumors and Lies

I write in the naked pages of this diary so that the truth will be known and my fate will not be left to the rumors and lies already whispering through the streets of Sevilla. Many, I am sure, will try to turn my life into a morality play after I am dead, but no man's life is so easily understood or dismissed.

I would not risk inscribing my secrets in this diary had I not been convinced to do so by my friend and benefactor, Don Pedro, the Marquis de la Mota. I argued that nothing I would write could be circulated in my lifetime without my being condemned by the Holy Office of the Inquisition and burned at the stake. The Inquisitor himself branded this danger into my imagination just yesterday. Perhaps it is this fresh threat, or the ultimatum of the King, that has at last caused me to pick up this quill and ink these words. The Marquis insisted that it is for posterity that I should write this diary, one's reputation being the only true immortality. But it is hardly vanity alone that causes me to write.

Thirty-six years have passed since my birth, or more correctly since my mother left me, a swaddled bundle, in the barn of the Convento de la Madre Sagrada. It is no doubt a sign of my advancing years that I have been persuaded for the first time in my life to consider how I will be remembered. Yet there is another desire that leads me to write in this diary. It is to pass on what I have learned about the Arts of Passion and of the holiness of womanhood. Since I have forsworn matrimony and have no heirs of my own blood, I must look to all who follow as my descendants and try to share with them what I have learned from the women I have been privileged to know so well.

A man's recollections always tend toward self-flattery, so I will not rely on my testimony alone and will instead write, as faithfully as possible, not only the events but the words themselves that were shouted during a duel or whispered during a passionate embrace.

It is this same pride that leads me to begin my account with the most daring seduction I have ever undertaken. My ambition was nothing less than to free the King's chaste and lonely daughter from her imprisonment in the royal palace of the Alcázar — for a night. I knew that if I were caught, it would be my privilege as a noble to place my head on the executioner's block and avoid the shame of the gallows.

A man's ambition, however, like his fate, is not always known to him in advance, and as I left the arms of the Widow Elvira, I had no hint of the danger that I would embrace last night.

Copyright © 2007 by Idea Architects

Table of Contents

Contents

Editor's Note

Rumors and Lies

A Flicker of Passion

The Desire of a Woman

No One Will Ever Know

Not Every Man with a Mask Is a Burglar

The Love of His Angels

A Vision of God

This I Cannot Do at Any Price

Like Salt into the Land

A Man Is Not Just What He Is Born

The Education of a Libertine

Gold in the Veins of Sevilla

The Slave Market

Taberna del Pirata

Secrets Never Stay Buried

A Thousand Nights with a Stranger

Corpus Christi

The Bullfight

Sins of the Flesh

The Deadliest Sin

Alma's Intuition

The Masquerade Party

Duchess Cristina's Invitation

The Truth

Knowledge That Could Lead to Our Ruin

Alma's Return

A New World

A Moth to a Flame

A Tour of Heaven

A Child of Deception and Cruelty

The Wager of Love

The Secret of Marriage

Safe Passage

Alma's Temptation

In the Name of the Holy Inquisition

Confession at the Alcázar

Dueling on the Rooftops of Sevilla

Doña Ana's Bedchamber

A Farewell

The Last Night: A Final Entry

Glossary and Notes

Acknowledgments

Author's Note

Reading Group Guide

The Lost Diary of Don Juan

Douglas Carlton Abrams

Description

In 1590’s Sevilla, Don Juan reveals through his lost diary his countless adventures and romances as a fugitive, seeking nobility. As a young boy, Juan is orphaned and left to the convent to fend for himself, and out if this grows a passionate, reckless boy seeking guidance into manhood.

Not long after his adventures with the convent, the great noble Marquis takes Don Juan under his own wing to train and mold into a shining galanteado. The Marquis trains Don Juan with a noble swordsman’s ability and enough passion to satisfy the entire city of widows and mistresses with his master of the supreme pleasure.

This the story begins as the Don Juan pursues passion and seduces the young fair daughter of the King Phillip II, right under his lordship’s nose. The pulse racing rendezvous with Infanata Dona Isabel make it clear that Don Juan will be the eternal sword fighting bachelor, relieving the streets of harm and it’s need for passion. That is until he sets his eyes on the exquisite, lovely, Dona Ana; the untouchable daughter of the fierce Commander of Calatrava, the Morisco-Slayer.

Heart-rendering and comprehensive, filled with evocative details from a seductive time and place, The Lost Diary of Don Juan illustrates a captivating romance filled with adventure and expectation creating a supreme pleasure for all.

Questions and Topics for Discussion

  1. As an orphan Don Juan depended on the convent and Padre Miguel for healing and growth. Don Juan writes: “It was from Padre Miguel that I learned God always sides with the weak, with the widow and with the orphan.” (p.33). Discuss the quote and focus on the role of the statues, priests and nuns during his early years.
  2. One of the central themes in the story is passion and seduction and Don Juan’s ability to deliver these experiences to women. What qualities does Don Juan possess that make him so successful? What does this say of Don Juan? How would the women he’s encountered respond?
  3. Don Juan repeatedly discusses mans’ inability to be monogamous and “to be faithful to ones’ wife seems like an unnecessary penance to almost all men. . . . I am not willing to wed a woman just to be unfaithful and untrue.” (p. 111).
  4. Don Juan’s friend and benefactor, Don Pedro, the Marquis de la Mota, played a critical part in the development of Don Juan’s noble character. Discuss the significance of the Marquis throughout the book. What forges their relationship?
  5. Consider the following statement spoken by Fatima, “There was more pleasure in one kiss from the man I loved than a thousand nights with a stranger.” (p. 120). Does Don Juan feel the same? What about the other characters?

  1. For some, a sexual experience is a union as a bridge to profound feelings of oneness and bliss. How does The Lost Diary of Don Juan celebrate this idea of a blissful union between lovers?
  2. How does Abrams illustrate the vision of true compassion for women to the reader?
  3. Sword fighting was a critical part of a gentleman’s existence during this time period. Discuss the art of sword fighting and how Don Juan develops his skill to perfection. How does Don Juan’ strength and his ability for fight with his sword play out in the eyes of women in Sevilla?
  4. Finally Don Juan discusses the “True Passionate Love,” (p. 257) as he forgets all other women and discovers his need for only Dona Ana. He declares his love to her in her bedchamber.. What is it about Dona Ana that secures a hold over Don Juan? What does she have that other woman do not?
  5. Don Juan eloquently breathes life into his desire and sensual ability to pleasure woman, and is very successful at the art. Consider the following, “Was it not God Himself who made man to desire women-flesh in his flesh- and for a women’s desire to also be for her man?” (p. 248). How is religion used to support Don Juan’s warm relationships with women and his heightened talents?
  6. Don Juan declares, “We shared our bodies with a fusion of love and lust- which I now understand is nothing more and nothing less that the consort of love,” (p. 274). Discuss the beauty in the above statement. How does Abrams illustrate Juan’s innocence and tenderness? How does this ending support the Don Juan image of today?

    Tips to Enhance Your Book Club


Throw a Casanova party and view the 2005 release of the movie, Casanova, directed by Lasse Hallstom. Discuss the parallels between Casanova and Don Juan.

http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/webbin/gutbook/lookup?num=5201 is an online historical book for further reading on the historical influences of Don Juan. Visit http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Don_Juan_Tenorio to learn more about the story of Don Juan. Peruse these websites to discuss the historical influences of Don Juan.

The tender topics courageously approached by author Douglas Carlton Abrams lends itself to discussion of the oldest debated topics in the world: passion and relationships. Visit http://nourishingarts.com/index.htm for more information about passion for women. Let this website and the book act as platform for further discussion and appreciation of various viewpoints on the topic.

Introduction

Questions and Topics for Discussion

1. As an orphan Don Juan depended on the convent and Padre Miguel for healing and growth. Don Juan writes: "It was from Padre Miguel that I learned God always sides with the weak, with the widow, and with the orphan" (p. 33). Discuss the quote and focus on the role of the statues, priests, and nuns during his early years.

2. One of the central themes in the story is passion and seduction, and Don Juan's ability to deliver these experiences to women. What qualities does Don Juan possess that make him so successful? What does this say of Don Juan? How would the women he encounters respond?

3. Don Juan repeatedly discusses man's inability to be monogamous and "to be faithful to one's wife seems like an unnecessary penance to almost all men.... I am not willing to wed a woman just to be unfaithful and untrue" (p. 111). What do you think of this statement? How does Don Juan's attitude change by the end of the book?

4. Don Juan's friend and benefactor, Don Pedro, the Marquis de la Mota, played a critical part in the development of Don Juan's noble character. Discuss the significance of the Marquis throughout the book. What forges their relationship?

5. Consider the following statement spoken by Fatima: "There was more pleasure in one kiss from the man I loved than a thousand nights with a stranger" (p. 120). Does Don Juan feel the same? What about the other characters?

6. For some, a sexual experience is a union and a bridge to profound feelings of oneness and bliss. How does The Lost Diary of Don Juan celebrate this idea of a blissful union between lovers?

7. How does the author illustrate the vision of Don Juan's true compassion for women to the reader?

8. Sword fighting was a critical part of a gentleman's existence during this time period. Discuss the art of sword fighting and how Don Juan develops his skill to perfection. How do his strength and his ability to fight with his sword affect how the women in Sevilla view him?

9. Finally Don Juan discusses "True Passionate Love" (p. 257) as he forgets all other women and discovers his need for only Doña Ana. What is it about Doña Ana that secures a hold over Don Juan? What does she have that other woman do not?

10. Don Juan eloquently breathes life into his desire and sensual ability to pleasure women, and is very successful at the art. Consider the following: "Was it not God Himself who made man to desire woman — flesh of his flesh — and for a woman's desire also to be for her man?" (p. 248). How is religion used to support Don Juan's relationships with women and his heightened talents?

11. Don Juan declares, "We shared our bodies with a fusion of love and lust — which I now understand is nothing more and nothing less than the holy consort of love" p. 274). Discuss the beauty in the above statement. How does Abrams illustrate Juan's innocence and tenderness? How does this ending support the passionate ideals of today?

Tips to Enhance Your Book Club

1. Throw a Don Juan party and view the 2005 movie Casanova, directed by Lasse Hallström. Discuss the parallels and differences between Casanova and Don Juan.

2. For further reading on the historical influences of Don Juan, visit http://www.don-juan.net and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Don_Juan to learn more about Don Juan's story. After reading these sites, discuss the historical influences of Don Juan.

3. The tender topics courageously approached by author Douglas Carlton Abrams lends itself to discussion of the oldest debated topics in the world: passion and relationships. Read the book coauthored by Doug's wife, Rachel Carlton Abrams, M.D., The Multi-Orgasmic Woman, for a further exploration of women's passion and sexuality. Let both books act as platforms for further discussion and appreciation of various viewpoints on the topic.

Customer Reviews

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The Lost Diary of Don Juan 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 18 reviews.
BookishRuth on LibraryThing 10 months ago
Set in 16th century Seville during Spain¿s Golden Age and the Spanish Inquisition, The Lost Diary of Don Juan is an action-packed look at the life and passion of the world¿s greatest lover.The son of a prostitute, Juan Tenorio is abandoned as an infant at the gates of a convent. He grows into a young man under the sisters¿ loving care and instruction. Juan seems destined for the priesthood until he falls in love with one of the nuns, Sister Teresa. The two begin a passionate affair, meeting in secret each evening. When they are eventually discovered, Juan is forced to leave the Church.The teenaged Juan Tenorio then joins a burglary ring in order to support himself. His skill as a thief and usefulness as a spy soon attracts the attention of the Marquis de la Monta, Don Pedro. The Marquis trains Juan as a libertine ¿ one unbridled by traditional morality ¿ and even secures a nobility title for the young man. Don Juan is a natural when it comes to the art of seduction, and his conquests are soon the stuff of legend. Unbeknownst to Don Juan, the Marquis is blackmailing the husbands and fathers of the women Don Juan seduces. Once Juan learns of this, he continues his libertine ways but refuses to reveal the identity of his partners to the Marquis.When the beautiful Dona Ana captures Don Juan¿s eye, the world¿s greatest lover finds himself embarking on his most challenging conquest of all: the mastery of his own heart. Can one who has enjoyed the pleasures of so many women find himself content with one woman for the rest of his life?Douglas Carlton Abrams gives us an intriguing look into the soul of a character who is usually portrayed as a villain and a rapist. Instead of depicting Don Juan as someone who preys on women, Abrams shows us a more tender side of the mythical lover. Passion is a central theme, not just sexual passion but also passion for life.One of the things I really enjoyed about this book was the humor. At one point, Don Juan is climbing a tree to reach a woman¿s bedroom. As the rough bark digs into his hands, he tells himself that one day, he will seduce a woman on the ground floor.As one would expect, sex plays a large part in this book. The Lost Diary of Don Juan is very sensual but never crass. The prose seems, on occasion, a little too flowery, but the compelling story tends to compensate for much of the florid language.
ragwaine on LibraryThing 10 months ago
After getting of to a shaky start this turned out being pretty good. I'm not sure if it has enought "romance" to keep a romance reader going but it didn't have so much romance that it turned me off and I'm not a romance reader.Though the overall plot was fairly predictable, I really liked the ending. One thing that bothered me was the constant "tension building" that never ended bad. Like "his legs were weak from the torture but with a final burst of strength he was able to..." and then 2 paragraphs later, "he could barely hold the sword but he was able to...". It just seemed like Don Juan was Superman by the time the chapter was over and it didn't really build any tension after the fifth near disaster in as many paragraphs.The other thing that was a little off-putting for me was that the narrator for this (audio) book was the same guy that does all the new Dune prequels. I kept on expecting sandworms to pop-up and eat Don Juan. But I don't suspect that would be a problem for too many people.
Kiwiria on LibraryThing 10 months ago
Very, very slow start. I almost gave up on it, but got stubborn, and it did improve enough for me to feel it wasn't a waste of time to finish. I know nothing about the original story of Don Juan, so I don't know how accurate it was.
sagustocox on LibraryThing 10 months ago
Douglas Carlton Abrams' The Lost Diary of Don Juan transports the reader into a world where honor and piety are praised in 16th Century Seville, Spain, at the height of the Inquisition. But love must be chaste, and not lustful. Don Juan is fabled to be one of the greatest lovers and seducers of women, much like Cassanova. This work of fiction, written in a diary format, examines the inner Don Juan, his philosophies about love and lust, and his desire to remain honorable even as a galanteador. He refuses to tell tales of his "conquests," a term that really is inappropriate in the context of this novel. Don Juan does not conquer these women, but sets them free from the constraints of a society against passion and living life.The sexual encounters in the novel are well portrayed and not too graphic, which is pleasing. Don Juan's humor is inviting as he talks about seducing women on the ground floor so he won't have to jump from trees to balconies any longer. There is often more than one side to a character or historical figure. These are humans after all and are we not multifaceted. I love the way in which Abrams fleshes out Don Juan as a sympathetic character in spite of his desires to lay with multiple women. He is not only a cad, but one who is afraid of truly loving one woman and becoming beholden to her as her faithful husband. He fears this love because he does not deem himself worthy.Don Juan is a sympathetic and believable character, and his redemption is so fleeting. It's a classic love story full of redemption, despite the fleeting nature of his redemption. He loves women, and in some ways worships them. Don Juan is unaware of what he is missing in these fleeting relationships because his adrenaline pumps through his veins as he leaves their homes and seeks to escape their angry husbands and fathers. That is until he meets Dona Ana.This novel has all the makings of a great historical piece from the duels and the honorable father to the trapped maiden, the wrath of the Inquisitor, and the betrayal of misplaced loyalties. Abrams carefully chooses his language to describe the streets and alleys of Sevilla, Espana, while sprinkling the text with Spanish words. This technique provides the diary technique with greater authenticity.Although Don Juan is often thought of as a cad, this novel will provide readers with an alternative view--a renewed perspective on why one man sought love in the arms of numerous women and why that one man ultimately met his match.
schmadeke on LibraryThing 10 months ago
Before reading The Lost Diary of Don Juan, the infamous title character was nothing more than a name to me. From a mere caricature, Abrams has skillfully created a character who is richly complex and multi-layered. As I read the eloquently written pages of Don Juan's diary, it was impossible not to be drawn into his libertine life and the intrigues of the city of Seville in 1593.With beautiful, readable prose, Abrams paints a vivid picture of late 16th century Spain. The descriptions have a very cinematic feel. I could visualize the walled courtyard of a nobleman's home, and the dark, dank interior of Don Juan's favorite tavern. I could feel the velvet fabric of his maroon doublet. I could smell the faint, seductive orange-apricot scent of a woman's perfume. The prose tends to feel a little flowery and euphemistic when describing Don Juan's many and varied sexual encounters, the upside of this being that the subject matter is thus handled in a manner that is inoffensive to a broader audience.The Spanish Inquisition was going strong in 1593, creating a sinister atmosphere in Seville which Abrams conveys well. His Inquisitor is a cruel, dark, ominous figure. The reader will sense that treachery and betrayal are rampant in Don Juan's world. Because of this, the trustworthy few - a nun or priest here, a loyal coachman there - feel all the more significant and engaging as supporting characters.
Kegsoccer on LibraryThing 10 months ago
"I looked at her smiling face, and her black hair, disheveled by our earlier desire. Her clear brown eyes reflected the flames of the candles that encircled the altar of her bed. How could I refuse her?" (The Lost Diary of Don Juan pg 3) "The Lost Diary of Don Juan" by Douglas Carlton Abrams is the story of Don Juan, a man raised by nuns who has to flee after having an affair with one of them. He's guided by a Marquis who teaches him 'swordplay and seduction'. Don Juan is essentially a libertine or a Casanova- a lover of all women. The story is a bit predictable, in that of course he will eventually fall in love (real love) with one woman. It's meant to be a diary, although there are very few moments when you will be able to tell. Each entry is certainly not started, "Dear Diary." There's plenty of dialogue along with the action, so really it just seems to be a story told in the past tense. I couldn't help but think, as I read, that certain parts of the book simply made me think of Zorro. Specifically the Marquis guiding Don Juan- it just made me picture (the somewhat-recent movie verion of) Anthony Hopkins molding Antonio Banderas into the new Zorro-"The Mask of Zorro"! I also found little love for the womanizing Don Juan. Despite the author's goal to display Don Juan's `love' of all women, all I could see was Don Juan's `lust' for all women. Those who enjoy Spanish historical fiction may enjoy this story, or perhaps those who enjoy romance. I couldn't really get into it though which is why it's only getting three stars from me.
piano3646 on LibraryThing 10 months ago
Good for a light read, but I found it too slow and monotonous. The subject is quite attractive and accessible, but I didn't come out the other end feeling sympathetic towards any character.
arielcoro on LibraryThing 10 months ago
I grew up wanting to visit Spain, when I finally did in 1998 I fell in love. Truth be known, I really fell in love with the Southern part of Spain or Andalusia and in particular with the city known as ¿Sevilla¿If you love literature as I do, you probably have heard many tales of ¿Don Juan Tenorio¿ that famous character personifying romance, bravery, and the essence and soul of Andalusia. When I heard the title of this book called ¿The Lost Diary of Don Juan¿, I had to have it. I normally have 2 or 3 books going at a time, but in this case, once I started, I could not put it down. Descriptions of Seville, its people, and its lore kept me glued to this one book until I finished. I even came to believe that many of the places described by Mr. Abrams were ones we had visited, after all much of the action takes place in the Barrio Santa Cruz where we stayed in the quaint local Hotel Murillo. What an adventure! Mr. Abrams takes you thru the life of a ¿Seducer¿ and brings you to his discovery of the true meaning of love and how to achieve it. Don Juan passion develops before your very eyes and you get to appreciate the lessons that lead him to find happiness. Interspersed throughout the book, you get history as it happened, tales of the Spanish Inquisition.For those not familiar with the Spanish language the Glossary is perfect. You may even want to glance over it at the beginning so you are fully prepared to enjoy the trip back to Seville¿s glorious time of Romance and Adventure. One last thing, when you have finished reading this book, you will probably want to start planning the vacation of a lifetime to Seville, Spain, where you will undoubtedly relive the adventures described throughout the pages of The Lost Diary of Don Juan.
brendajanefrank on LibraryThing 10 months ago
Probably well done but boring.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Guest More than 1 year ago
The Lost Diary of Don Juan is the story of the title character. Douglas Carlton Abrams paints a picture of a daring man that comes from humble beginnings and achieves nobility. Abrams incorporates ancient Tantric teachings in his book. Nuns adopted Young Don Juan. His first sexual experience was with a novice. The book continues to share the account of his indiscretions with women and adventures as a spy. Don Juan searches for the passion of one true love as he makes love to as many women as possible (but only once each.) His desire for true love conflicts with his determination to never make love to a woman more than once. The Lost Diary of Don Juan was very interesting. I knew little about the fictional character, Don Juan, before reading this book. The women in this book knew they were adored. Erotic, entertaining, romantic are all apt descriptions of this book. The setting is the 1500s Spain during the time of the Inquisition. Men could learn a lot about wooing a woman from this book. The passionate but delicately written love scenes will tantalize women. Rush out and purchase your copy.
Guest More than 1 year ago
oug Abrams has delivered an amazing, fast-paced adventure filled with passion, intrigue, and humanity. This book is truly a page-turner, brilliantly crafted and researched, yet tightly written. For those suspicious of historical settings which sometimes provide too much detail for the impatient reader, fear not! This story moves along really nicely in the first hundred pages, and the next two hundred will find you torn between racing to find out what happens next and savoring every delicious detail. Speaking of delicious detail, the scenes depicting Don Juan's 'conquests' were beautifully, tastefully, and respectfully written. At the same time, anyone of the male persuasion seeking to expand his repertoire with respect to wooing the fairer sex could do worse than to peruse Don Juan's diary as a great 'how-to' manual on romance, love, and, of course, seduction! The writing reflects a deep understanding of women and a beautiful philosophy reconciling the age-old questions about passion versus love, ironically providing a recipe for both. This book brings to life the rich splendor and the harshness of life during 16th century Spain. As Don Juan races through the streets, over the rooftops, and in and out bedroom windows of Seville, the reader is immersed in a powerful drama ripe with fascinating 'yet never overpowering or depressing' details of life in another time. These pages provide a ringside seat to the terrors of the Inquisition, the promises of gambling on riches from new worlds, the privileges and oppression coexisting in a rigid class structure, the tastes and smells of glorious banquets and celebrations, and, of course, the joys of great passion and seduction. Lastly, Abrams' Don Juan is anything but the cardboard stereotype we have come to associate with this character in modern thinking. Don Juan Tenorio's story is filled with humanity. One cannot help but fall in love with Don Juan and admire his journey from orphan to noble and his loyalty to the friends of his early days. We root for our hero as he grapples with ethical, moral, and social questions, and we cheer him on as he displays touching, charming, and dangerous examples of chivalry, generosity, and friendship. Buy this book and plan an amazing weekend getaway in the comfort of your couch! Ladies, buy copies for all the men in your lives who might appreciate some insights into the fairer sex, then buy copies for all your girlfriends so you can TALK ABOUT the details! Gentlemen, buy copies for all for your friends 'bachelors and otherwise'! The wisdom and romance in these pages will spice up and deepen any relationship.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I found Don Juan to be thoroughly engaging, suspenseful and fun! The elements of romance, adventure and humor are wonderfully woven together throughout the book. The characters are interesting and provide many insights into the soul of Don Juan. The concept of the diary and how it is developed contributed beautifully to a very dynamic plot. It is one of those books you can¿t put down because you build a relationship with the main character and you become intrigued with where the story is headed. Overall a fantastic book that I know I will reread. I highly recommend it!
harstan More than 1 year ago
In Seville, he was named Juan Tenorio, but his mother abandons him near a monastery. Nuns secretly raise and torture the child even as they train him to cherish and worship women. He eventually runs away from the nasty environs to become an outlaw. Eventually he meets the Marquis de la Mota, who teaches him to be a master spy, a master swordsman, and a master lover. He is so adept at the latter some consider him to be a demon. Hearing word of the legend of lovemaking, the inquisitor general investigates Don, who refuses to wed even at the coaxing of his mentor as a means of saving his life. That is until he encounters the fiery warrior woman Dona Ana. --- Using the device of finding Don Juan's diary to tell his story works brilliantly in Douglas Abrams¿ superior historical fictional memoir of the renowned lover from his perspective. By writing the saga through the journal, Don Juan becomes more than a one head joke as the audience sees a full blooded person with wants and desires that are not only in the boudoir. Interestingly when Don Juan describes a conquest (and not just with women), he waxes poetic like a romance writer. Readers will enjoy this fast-paced account of the world¿s greatest lover as he plunges into one escapade (and woman) after another. --- Harriet Klausner