The Perfect Assassin: Book 1 in the Chronicles of Ghadid

The Perfect Assassin: Book 1 in the Chronicles of Ghadid

by K. A. Doore

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Overview

A novice assassin is on the hunt for someone killing their own in K. A. Doore's The Perfect Assassin, a breakout high fantasy beginning the Chronicles of Ghadid series.

Divine justice is written in blood.

Or so Amastan has been taught. As a new assassin in the Basbowen family, he’s already having second thoughts about taking a life. A scarcity of contracts ends up being just what he needs.

Until, unexpectedly, Amastan finds the body of a very important drum chief. Until, impossibly, Basbowen’s finest start showing up dead, with their murderous jaan running wild in the dusty streets of Ghadid. Until, inevitably, Amastan is ordered to solve these murders, before the family gets blamed.

Every life has its price, but when the tables are turned, Amastan must find this perfect assassin or be their next target.

The Perfect Assassin is a thrilling fantastical mystery that had me racing through the pages.” —S. A. Chakraborty, author of The City of Brass

“Full of rooftop fights, frightening magic, and nonstop excitement and mystery, I absolutely loved it from start to finish!” — Sarah Beth Durst

The Chronicles of Ghadid
#1: The Perfect Assassin
#2: The Impossible Contract (coming in November 2019)
#3: The Unconquered City (coming in June 2020)

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780765398550
Publisher: Tom Doherty Associates
Publication date: 03/19/2019
Series: Chronicles of Ghadid Series , #1
Pages: 352
Sales rank: 124,005
Product dimensions: 5.30(w) x 8.20(h) x 1.00(d)

About the Author

K. A. DOORE was born in Florida but has since lived in Washington, Arizona, and Germany. She has a BA in Classics and Foreign Languages and an enduring fascination with linguistics. These days she writes fantasy in mid-Michigan and develops online trainings for child welfare professionals. The Perfect Assassin is her debut novel.

Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER 1

The wind tore at Amastan's wrap, trying to slide warm fingers beneath the fabric and unravel the knots. It tasted of heat and dust, the only products of the sands that stretched endless before him. His tagel kept the worst of the sand from getting into his mouth and between his teeth, but he still had to squint to see through the onslaught.

If he turned and wove back between the buildings, the wind would taper and calm. But here on the edge of the city — on the edge of the platform — there was nothing between him and the sky and the sands several hundred feet below.

The sun had set and night fell fast. Straight east, the first stars began to appear. In another hour, the moon would rise and fill the void that the sun had left, but until then Amastan would have only the light the stars gave him.

It would have to be enough.

"The unshakeable Amastan isn't scared, is he?" taunted Dihya.

His eldest cousin stood to one side, her thick, muscular arms crossed. When he glanced her way, Dihya flashed him a smile that was all teeth. Amastan didn't reward her with a response.

Silently, he reviewed for the fifth — okay, sixth — time the assortment of tools he'd brought. Rope, chain, knives, gloves, water, shoes. He touched the charm that hung between his collarbones. Its leather was soft and bulged with the usual herbs for protection. But for this journey, the charm maker had added a scrap of vellum inked with words that would protect him from jaan. At least, the charm maker had insisted it would. Amastan hadn't exactly had a chance to test it in the city.

Fear tightened his chest at the thought of jaan. He pushed the fear away, breathing deep and focusing on the steps he'd take to complete this one, final test. A dizzyingly long drop and a short sprint across the sands was all that stood between him and becoming an assassin. While deceptively simple, Tamella had built this test around his weaknesses: strength, stamina, and a willingness to be flexible.

He couldn't help but wonder if, on top of all that, Tamella had known about his fear of jaan. Nothing got past his teacher, but then again, that specific fear had never come up during their years of training. He knew. He'd been careful about that.

The wild jaan below were little more than stories. Jaan were as rare as storms. He had nothing to fear but the time limit and, if he failed, Tamella's disappointment. He wouldn't run up against either with the right mindset and planning. He could do this. He would do this.

"Why're you stalling?" asked Azulay, almost shouting as he overcompensated for the wind.

"Stop pestering him," said Menna. She bounced up and down on her toes, betraying her own impatience.

Dihya, Azulay, and Menna had trained with him almost daily for the last five years. The four of them were this generation's candidates, handpicked by Tamella to carry on the family's secret, bloody tradition. In the beginning, the only thing they'd had in common was a very loose relation by blood and the family name they could claim if they wanted. Now, they shared calluses and scars, hopes and dreams, fears and nightmares. Now, they were cousins.

The other three had already completed their tests, each tailored to their particular weaknesses. Amastan had watched each of them pass with increasing trepidation. Tamella had promised that one of them would fail. And now here he was, the only cousin that remained.

"I just want him to go already," whined Azulay. "I could be sleeping instead of standing out here, getting sand in my teeth."

"Sleeping? Really?" Dihya's voice was heavy with skepticism. "Don't you mean losing baats gambling with the caravanners?"

"No. I mean sleeping." Azulay paused, then added, "There aren't any caravans at the end of season and you know it."

"They'll return in a few weeks with the rains, don't worry," said Dihya. "Now, can't you enjoy watching your cousin sweat a simple climb with us? It's not often you get to see 'Stan nervous."

"I'm not nervous."

Amastan immediately regretted rising to the bait. Dihya laughed at him and his cheeks and ears warmed with the rush of embarrassment. Thankfully, his tagel hid any sign of his awkwardness from his cousins. He could've worn his tagel low tonight, since he was among family, but he'd chosen to wear it high, above his nose but just below his eyes to protect against the blowing sand.

"I'm sure Tamella was joking when she said one of us would fail," said Menna.

This time, Azulay laughed, high and sharp. "Have you ever heard the Serpent joke?"

"Shut up, Az'," said Menna. "I'm trying to give him some confidence."

Amastan closed his eyes, ignoring them both. He took a deep breath, then cast away all of his doubts and focused on the task at hand. It was simple, really.

First: he had to get down to the sands.

A metal cable hung above his head and plunged from the edge of the platform into the thickening darkness. Somewhere below, its other end was affixed to a large pole dug deep into the sands. During the day, a carriage descended on that wire to pick up anyone waiting below. Now, at night, the carriage was locked in place at his back.

He wouldn't be unlocking it; Tamella had made it clear that he couldn't take a carriage down. One would be waiting for him on the sands beneath the next neighborhood, but it was up to him to find a way to it in the allotted time.

Amastan adjusted his tagel and wrap, testing the knots and pulling the fabric taut. Then he uncoiled his rope with a flick of his wrist. He wound the rope around his waist twice, looping it through his belt each time, before pulling a length of chain from the bag at his feet. Fabric wove through the links on both ends and covered the metal in cloth. He tied the rope to one end of the chain, then stood on his toes and tossed the chain over the cable. He caught it and tied off the other end.

With both hands overhead to keep the chain from slipping down the cable, he paused to reassess his preparations. Had he forgotten anything? He had two sheathed blades at his waist and a smaller knife strapped to his bicep. Charm pouch. Full water skin. Wrap and tagel were knotted tight. He even had a fire striker and tinder. Just in case.

He had everything he needed and time was falling fast. Yet he hesitated. Why?

Sometimes, said his sister Thiyya in the back of his head, you don't even know when you've been possessed by a jaani.

Thiyya had liked to frighten him with tales about jaan and madness when he was young. In Ghadid, the jaan were little more than words whispered late at night to scare children, yet Amastan had never been able to shake his fear of them. Now dread squeezed his throat as he faced the reality that he would have to walk on the very sands where the jaan weren't just stories. Jaan that struck travelers mute and made it impossible to find any path. Jaan that entered minds and drove men mad. Jaan that made you forget who you were.

"Right," said Amastan, pushing away his fear with that one word.

And with that, he took one, two, three steps to the edge of the platform and — before he could think — a fourth step onto nothing.

Amastan dropped. Someone gasped. Not him: he was holding his breath to keep from screaming. Down, down, with just enough time to panic — then a jolt as the cable caught his weight and now he was truly falling, flying forward into dizzying darkness. The screech of metal chain on metal cable was almost as loud as the wind wailing in his ears. Despite his care, his wrap caught and flapped in the rush.

The chain warmed, then turned hot, the metal burning his hands even through the cloth he'd wrapped around it. He glanced back once to see the pale glow of the platform reeling away like a horrible dream. The friction between the chain and the wire spit up a trail of sparks that dazzled his eyes and soon hid the platform's glow.

It was much easier to face forward, his knees curled up to reduce drag. If he tucked his chin in, just so, then he avoided the worst of the wind. Still, his eyes watered and smarted as he sped down, down, down toward the smear of darkness below.

Soon he burned all over, from his abdomen to his shoulders to his hands. He tightened his grip on the chain despite the pain of forming blisters. Just another moment, then another —

Suddenly, the ground was more than a blur. He could make out the lines and ridges the wind had sculpted in the sand. Amastan could see where the cable terminated at a long metal pole that grew from the ground like a miniature pylon. A pole he'd run smack into if he didn't do something, fast.

He twisted the chain around the wire until its screech was louder than the wind. He slowed down, but not enough. The pole was coming at him like an angry camel. He pulled harder and the chain burned as hot as fire. All he wanted was to let go, but now he'd slowed from a panicked gallop to an ambling run.

The pole was a dozen yards away, a dozen feet — finally Amastan let go and dropped the remaining short distance to the sand. The rope around his waist caught and stopped him from falling face-first. The chain kept sliding until it hit the pole with a loud clang that was swallowed by the emptiness all around him.

Fingers shaking, Amastan undid the rope's knots and unwound it from his waist. He coiled it tight and slipped it through his belt. He fished the chain out of the sand and held it by its tattered cloth, the metal still too hot to touch. Then he swore under his breath and dropped the chain, letting the sand claim it. The links at its center were all but melted through. Another few seconds and it would've snapped.

He pushed the thought away. Another few seconds would've seen him swimming through sand. It was nothing to worry about.

Amastan turned in place, scanning every inch of his surroundings. Sand, sand, and more sand. But when he looked closer, there was more than just sand. Small rocks were scattered across the landscape, clustered close to the pole. The persistent wind had shaped the sand into patterns and ridges. Farther away the sand rose and fell in bumps and bubbles like the surface of rising bread.

Farther still, a wide swath of darkness cut through the sand and sky and rose impossibly straight and impossibly far: a pylon. A circular platform capped the pylon, a faint glow delineating its edges against the night sky. More pylons broke the ground and the sky to the west, spreading north and south in a gradual curve that hugged the Wastes. There were easily hundreds of them, each holding up its own circular platform and life.

Ghadid. The city looked so distant and empty from beneath. Amastan realized how bizarre it must appear to the iluk who spent their entire lives down here. He wished he could see it during the day.

The wind picked up, whispering and reminding him that time was falling. He counted the pylons nearby, placing them on his mental map of Ghadid. He needed to go to the next neighborhood to find the carriage, which meant he needed to head for the — one, three, five — seventh pylon away. He could just barely discern its hulking shadow in the darkness. He would have to run to make it in time.

He unslung the sand shoes on his back. They'd cost more baats than they were worth, but that was the price he'd had to pay, wanting an iluk item when no iluk were around. The leather straps were already perfectly set for his bare feet. He had the shoes on and tightened within seconds.

The sand felt more like firm ground. He took a few steps, then jogged a few more. The sand was slippery and deceptive, but if he put his foot down just so, he wouldn't lose his balance. Good.

A dim, silvery glow hulked on the horizon: the moon threatening its arrival. He had until the moon had fully risen to make it to the carriage. Twenty, thirty minutes, maybe. Enough time to traverse the same distance up above, in the city. Down on the sands, with no buildings or bridges between him and his destination, it should take even less time.

So why did he feel so nervous?

He ran. He stumbled a few times before finally finding his stride. The shoes were wider than camel feet and helped spread his weight out across the sands and keep him from sinking. But the extra width was tricky to walk with, let alone run. He fixed his gaze on the direction he needed to go and didn't think about how open and empty his surroundings were. The sands extended forever on all sides, leaving him nowhere to shelter or to hide. He was exposed. Alone.

Except.

Except he didn't feel alone. The back of his neck prickled as if someone, somewhere was watching him. But that was impossible. No one could see him from the city and no one else would be down here this late in the season, when all the wells were dry.

No one sane, anyway.

Just the wind, he told himself.

Jaan ride the wind, whispered his sister late at night as the wind whistled through the cracks of their home. The candles had flickered and spat, sending shadows skittering across Thiyya's grim smile.

He glanced back. He couldn't help it. But there was nothing except sand, dark and starlit. The night had already swallowed the cable he'd come down on and its metal pole, but he couldn't yet see his destination. He felt displaced. The pylons moved past at an indeterminable and unstoppable rate, as if they were the giant sajaam of old. The only noises were the shh-shh-shh of his footfalls, the wet rasp of his breath beneath his tagel, and the wind.

Where was the cable? He stared hard ahead, willing the darkness to reveal a hint of metal. He counted the pylons, matching them to the map of Ghadid again. The city he knew so well, he could navigate its rooftops blindfolded. But down here —

He wasn't lost. That was impossible. He'd headed straight north, which should have brought him within spitting distance of the next cable. That is, as long as he'd kept running straight. And he had ... hadn't he?

The fear he'd been suppressing flared, threatened to overwhelm him. For a moment, he knew he was lost. He'd never find the carriage in time. Tamella would leave him stranded down here until morning and by then he'd be driven mad by a jaani. His mind, his memories, his self — everything would be gone.

Or — he told himself forcefully, shoving his fear back down — I'll find the carriage and everything will be fine.

There — a glint in the darkness, a line cutting through the air. The next cable. Relief flooded him and only then did he realize how terrified he'd been. He was going to be fine. He was going to complete this test. Soon he'd be back platform-side, surrounded by his cousins, safe from jaan. He would laugh at his fears. Tamella would congratulate him. And he would never have to come down to the sands again.

Except ...

Where was the carriage? He'd traced the cable down to its pole, but the pole was empty. In another minute, he reached the pole and stopped. He touched it, reassuring himself that this was real. The pole was still warm with the day's heat. But there was no carriage.

He followed the cable back up with his gaze. He could see the platform, the warm glow of torchlight spilling over its edge, but no movement; nothing approaching. He turned, checked the horizon. The moon had peaked over the edge, but he still had time before it fully rose.

He wasn't too late. So where was it?

Amastan checked the sand around the pole for marks, but there were only his own prints. If he wasn't late, was Tamella?

He swallowed, his throat scratchy and dry. He shifted from foot to foot and took a swig of water. The wind picked up. His water skin slipped in his sweaty palms and almost fell. He caught it and rehooked it to his belt with trembling fingers.

Focus ... focus ... he needed to focus on his next steps. The carriage would come down. He would be off the sands, soon. He just needed to wait and be patient. Unlike Menna, he was patient. He could wait forever.

The wind swirled around him like a hot breath, hissing in his ears. His heart pounded fast as if he were still running, even as he stood and waited. That feeling of being watched returned.

You can't see a jaani coming, said his sister.

The moon cast off the horizon and rose like a dream into the sky. Its thin light spilled across the sands, casting a million tiny shadows and throwing the pylons into stark relief. Amastan could see better now, almost as well as at midday. That only made everything worse.

He could see the wind swirling across the sand. He could see the dunes in the far distance, a blurred threat. He could see things that he knew weren't there, figures in the corner of his eye that were only shadows when he turned. And he could see that the cable was still empty, that no carriage was on its way.

Dread knotted and weighed down his stomach. Despite the prickly heat, he felt a chill. He realized, then, that the carriage wasn't coming. Of course it wasn't. Tamella was testing his weaknesses, not his strengths. He'd prepared for exactly what she'd told him to prepare for, but the test was more than that. If he was patient, he would fail.

(Continues…)


Excerpted from "The Perfect Assassin"
by .
Copyright © 2019 K. A. Doore.
Excerpted by permission of Tom Doherty Associates.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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The Perfect Assassin: Book 1 in the Chronicles of Ghadid 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
taramichelle 10 months ago
When I started The Perfect Assassin, I was expecting an action-filled fantasy about assassins and their kills. While there is some action, this book is very much a mystery novel. Because of that, the pace was a lot slower than I was expecting. Doore did a fantastic job with the world-building, which had a decidedly Middle-Eastern feel. I'm always happy to see a non-Western fantasy world, particularly when it's as brilliantly imagined as this one. Ghadid is a city that was built on hundreds of interconnected platforms above the desert in order to protect its people from the wild jaan that roam the sands. The main currency is water, which can also be used for magical healing. I also liked how intricate the death ceremonies were and how the reader was shown the importance of each step. However, I struggled to connect with Amastan, he just never felt fully formed to me. He was incredibly uncertain of his choices and, until the very end, didn't really have much of a character arc. I did love the romance, it was actually one of my favorite things about this book. I still wanted a bit more depth there though. Additionally, perhaps because I struggled to connect with Amastan, I never really felt engaged with the plot. The mystery itself was somewhat drawn-out and lacking in tension. I did like the ending but I felt the build-up to that event could have been shortened without loosing much of the backstory. Overall, The Perfect Assassin wasn't what I was expecting it to be. It was a decent mystery with some fantastic world-building. If you go in expecting that, I think you'll enjoy it more than I did! *Disclaimer: I received this book for free from the publisher. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.
Anonymous 11 months ago
I love it so much! She's done some great world building that I am super interested in the details for? Like tell me more about the Marab please?! It has mystery and action and a first love that had me clutching my face!
Eshana Ranasinghe More than 1 year ago
The Perfect Assassin is spectacular. It had so many things I loved and so much more. It's a murder mystery with ghosts and gay assassins in the desert! How can you not want to read that? The characters and world building was amazing and I wanted to read it again the moment I finished it. I received an arc in exchange for an honest review from Netgalley.
thegeekishbrunette More than 1 year ago
The Perfect Assassin follows Amastan who has  completed his training to become an assassin and now must try to figure out who the killer is that is hunting his own and if he has the courage to take a life with his own hands. Amastan has doubts about his new position in the family business and I think that's why I like him. It makes him feel more realistic. He fights a lot of battles inside himself with right and wrong and it really makes you feel for him. The other characters, including Amastan, were well developed and their backgrounds were interesting. I enjoyed knowing what they did before they got into the business or what they still do. There is a relationship in this book between Amastan and another character but it isn't overbearing and I appreciate that.  The plot is a murder mystery and the murderer, for me at least, wasn't obvious. The pace was on point and it kept me intrigued. Her world building is intricate and was refreshing to have a fantasy be in the desert because it doesn't happen often. I love the added bit of paranormal beings called the jaan. They really added to the suspense and were different than many other paranormal beings in other books. The writing is nothing short of phenomenal and I felt as I was there right in the action.   Assassins are one thing that I love and this book didn't disappoint. I am so glad I was able to read it. If you love murder, vengeance, and assassins I would highly recommend this book! (I received a digital copy from the publisher. All opinions are my own.)
BookishWendy More than 1 year ago
If you've had your fill of grimdark antiheroes and are in search of a genuinely *good* guy to root for (who also happens to be a reluctant assassin), you've got to read this one! There are angry desert spirits, a murdery political plot, a dash of romance, and a rich desert setting that's almost a character in its own right: the city of Ghadid, built on pillars above the treacherous sands. Thanks to Netgalley and Macmillan-Tor/Forge for providing an advanced reader's copy of this book.
CaptainsQuarters More than 1 year ago
Ahoy there me mateys!  I received this fantasy eARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.  So here be me honest musings . . . Now obviously the title and cover are what grabbed me attention for this one.  I love me some assassins so I had to read this author's debut novel.  This story follows Amastan who is training to be an assassin.  However, he is unsure if he will be able to kill when the time comes.  Life becomes difficult when he stumbles across the body of a clan leader that has been murdered.  Then other assassins start being murdered.  The uneasy spirits of the dead begin to gather in the city and are intent on harm.  Amastan has to find the murderer before the fabric holding the city together breaks. I thought overall that this was a solid book.  It did feel like a YA title even though it doesn't seem to be marketed as such.  I felt that the world building was the best part of the book.  The city is set on a platform above a desert and water is scarce.  I enjoyed the currency set around water.  I enjoyed that women hold high positions in society.  I liked the LGBTQ relationships.  I thought the set-up of the murders was rather nice and intriguing.  I also liked the jaani who are malevolent spirits of the dead. In the end however, I did not like many of the plot points.  Most of this stems from the identity of the killer which I saw from far away while hoping that I was wrong.  I wasn't.  So very sad and rather cliche.  The murder mystery plot ended up being shoddy in terms of how it was solved.  I also wished that the jaani played a more awesome role.  How that problem was wrapped up was also lackluster. I am glad I finished the book and I did enjoy it.  Apparently there is a second book in the series even though this book reads as a standalone.  The next book may be from a different point of view.  I am not sure if the world building is strong enough for me to want to read it.  That said, I am interested in the author's future work based on the solid foundation of this tale.  Arrr! So lastly . . . Thank you Macmillian-Tor/Forge!