ISBN-10:
084935031X
ISBN-13:
2900849350312
Pub. Date:
11/28/2005
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Portal to Lean Production: Principles and Practices for Doing More with Less / Edition 1

Portal to Lean Production: Principles and Practices for Doing More with Less / Edition 1

by John Nicholas
Current price is , Original price is $105.0. You

Temporarily Out of Stock Online

Please check back later for updated availability.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 2900849350312
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Publication date: 11/28/2005
Series: Resource Management Series
Edition description: New Edition
Pages: 344
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 1.25(h) x 9.00(d)

Table of Contents

Prefacexiii
Acknowledgmentsxv
The Authorsxvii
1Portal to Lean Production1
1.1Race with a Moving Finish Line2
1.1.1Center of the Manufacturing Universe2
1.1.2Customer Expectations3
1.1.3Everyone Is in the Race3
1.2Awakening to Lean Production4
1.2.1Abandoning Manufacturing4
1.2.2Lean Is Different5
1.2.3Resistance to Lean6
1.2.4Universal Application7
1.3The Portal7
1.3.1Elements of the Portal7
1.3.2Application of the Model9
1.4The Organization of the Book9
Notes12
Part IThe Journey, First Steps13
2Beginnings15
2.1Toyota Production System17
2.2Quick History of TPS17
2.2.1Back, Before Toyota18
2.2.2Early Automobile Production19
2.2.3Visit to the Rouge20
2.2.4Stocking a Supermarket21
2.2.5Inherent Flexibility22
2.2.6Getting Competitive23
2.2.7Eliminate Waste24
2.2.8Focused Factories, Cells, and Subplants25
2.2.9Automating No Defects25
2.2.10A System Takes Form26
2.2.11Beyond the Factory27
2.2.12From Aircraft to Autos28
2.3TPS and the Portal to Lean Production29
Notes30
3First Glimpse of a Manufacturing Cell31
The Indiana Plant32
A New Concept Takes Hold32
Expanding the Concept33
3.1Cellular Manufacturing35
3.1.1Workcell Operation35
3.1.2Output Flexibility36
3.2Throughput and Quality37
3.2.1Myth of Large-Batch Production38
3.2.2Small-Batch Production39
3.2.3Product Quality42
3.2.4One-Piece Flow42
3.2.5Workcell Size43
3.2.5.1Number of Operators43
3.2.5.2Number of Operations43
3.2.6Applications44
3.2.7Muda44
Note45
4Gaining Experience, Broadening the Concept47
Trap Cell48
4.1Product Family Concept49
4.1.1Cell Design for a Product Family49
4.1.2Uniform Load for the Product Family50
4.2Scheduling for Uniform Load52
4.2.1Lumpy Schedules53
4.2.2Heijunka54
4.2.3Forced Improvement and Elimination of Waste56
4.2.4Takt Time56
4.2.5Process Stability57
Implementing the Trap Cell57
Data Gathering58
Trap Cell Becomes Reality58
4.3Cell Design59
4.3.1Cycle Time60
4.3.2Design of Assembly Cells60
4.3.3Design of Machining Cells63
4.3.4Workcell Capacity66
4.3.5Productivity Improvement67
4.3.6Minimum Tolerable CT68
Notes68
5Applying the Cell Concept Plantwide69
The Revelation70
Avoiding the Big Machine Bottleneck70
Linked Operations73
Revelation: Cellularize Everything75
5.1Linked Workcells and Subcells76
5.1.1Coordinated Operations78
5.1.2Cell Operator Duties79
5.1.3Cell Equipment80
5.2Implementation81
5.2.1The MRP System81
5.2.2Operator Roles and Responsibilities81
5.2.3Training82
5.2.4Incentives82
5.2.5Standards82
5.2.6Management Support83
5.2.7Cell Planning, Design, and Launch83
5.2.8You Need All This to Be Lean84
Notes85
Part IIBuilding Up Steam87
6Kanban89
Inventory Mess90
Adopting Pull Production90
Time for a New Approach91
Additions to the System99
Problems Encountered99
Lessons Learned100
6.1Pull-Production Concepts101
6.1.1Stockless Production101
6.1.2Containers and Cards102
6.1.3Process Improvement102
6.2Number of Kanbans103
6.2.1Mathematical Computation103
6.2.2Operator-Set Kanban Targets105
6.2.3Safety Margin106
6.2.4Special Cases, Other Issues107
6.3Signal and Control: Methods and Issues107
6.3.1e-Kanban108
6.3.2Cardless Kanban Systems108
6.3.3Conditions109
6.3.4Limitations111
6.3.5Visual Management111
Notes112
7Total Productive Maintenance113
Breakdown in the Trap Cell114
Concepts of Maintenance Management115
Basic Preventive Maintenance115
Maintenance Management System116
Operator Ownership116
Lubrication116
Maintenance Staff Responsibilities118
7.1Preventive Maintenance120
7.1.1Equipment Effectiveness123
7.1.1.1Availability123
7.1.1.2Efficiency124
7.1.1.3Quality125
7.1.1.4Overall Equipment Effectiveness125
7.1.2Preventive Maintenance Programs126
7.1.2.1Normal Operating Conditions126
7.1.2.2Equipment Requirements127
7.1.2.3Cleanliness and Organization127
7.1.2.4Daily Monitoring128
7.1.2.5Scheduled Preventive Maintenance128
7.1.2.6Information Management129
7.1.2.7Predictive Maintenance132
7.1.2.8Operator Involvement133
7.2Total Productive Maintenance134
7.2.1Equipment Restoration and Redesign134
7.2.2New Roles for Maintenance Staff135
7.2.3Eliminate Human Error135
7.2.4Implementation136
Notes140
8Quick Changeover141
A Tale of Two Plants142
Setup Reduction Expert142
New Opportunity143
8.1Setup Reduction Concepts and Techniques148
8.1.1Traditional Approaches148
8.1.2Setup Reduction Methodology149
8.2SMED Procedure150
8.2.1Step 1: Distinguish Internal Tasks from External Tasks150
8.2.2Step 2: Convert Internal Tasks to External Tasks151
8.2.3Step 3: Improve Every Task in the Setup Procedure152
8.2.4Step 4: Abolish the Setup153
8.3Techniques for Setup Reduction154
Checklist154
Attachments and Fasteners154
Eliminate Adjustments155
Storage156
Carts157
Material Handling157
8.4Setup-Reduction Projects158
8.5Component of a Larger System160
Notes160
9Standard Work161
Strange-Looking Charts162
9.1Concept of Standard Work163
9.1.1Standard Work vs. Work Standards163
9.1.2Consistency and Quality164
9.1.3Standardization: Precursor for Improvement165
9.2What Is Standard Work?165
9.2.1Essential Elements165
9.2.2Standard Work Definition: Tools and Process167
9.3Critical Role in Kaizen171
Notes175
10Focused Factories177
Early Focused-Factory Experience178
Focused-Factory Team Leaders179
A Little Knowledge Can Be180
Clash of the Old and the New181
10.1Focused Factory182
10.1.1Concepts182
10.1.2How Small?183
10.1.3What to Focus On: Focused-Factory Variants184
10.2Microdesign Issues187
10.2.1Flexible Flow Lines187
10.2.2Flexible U- and S-Lines187
10.2.3Working Out the Final Layout188
10.3Clustering Products and Operations189
10.3.1Establishing Product and Machine Groupings189
10.3.2Cluster Analysis190
10.3.3Natural Groups, Then What?192
10.3.4Machine Utilization194
10.4Focused-Factory Organization194
Notes197
11Customer-Focused Quality199
Listening to Your Customers200
Customer Complaint200
Statistical Variation203
Experimentation204
Awakening205
Road to Six Sigma206
11.1Quality Assurance in Lean Production207
11.1.1Six Sigma Quality207
11.1.2Statistical Interpretation207
11.1.3Quality Programs209
11.1.4Quality-Improvement Process210
11.1.5Training and Certification210
11.1.6Quality Ownership, Employee Empowerment211
11.2Problem-Solving Tools212
11.2.1The Five-Why Analysis212
11.2.2Magnificent 7213
11.2.2.1Checksheet213
11.2.2.2Histogram213
11.2.2.3Pareto Analysis213
11.2.2.4Scatter Diagram214
11.2.2.5Process Flowchart216
11.2.2.6Cause-Effect Analysis217
11.2.2.7Run Diagram218
11.3Statistical Process Control220
11.3.1Control Chart220
11.3.2Process Stability222
11.3.3Process Capability223
11.4Nonstatistical Process Control224
11.5Quality at the Source224
11.5.1Source Inspection224
11.5.2Self-Checks225
11.5.3Successive and Special Checks225
11.5.4Self-Check Success225
11.5.5Andons226
11.5.6Pokayoke226
11.5.7Line Stop228
11.6Quality Improvement and TPS228
Notes228
Part IIISustaining Momentum231
12Employee Involvement, Workplace Organization, Kaizen233
12.1Employee Involvement and Workplace Organization234
12.1.1Five S235
12.1.2Workplace Organization and Kaizen236
12.1.3Kaizen Blitz237
12.1.4Kaizen Projects239
Kaizen of Main Vent Assembly Cell239
Kickoff Meeting, 9 a.m.240
12.2Value Stream Mapping241
Main Vent Assembly Cell
Walkthrough, 10:30 a.m.243
Mapping the Process244
Few Weeks Later: Current State245
One Year Later: Future State247
VSM and the Trap Cell248
Notes249
13Supply-Chain Partnerships251
Learning from Our Suppliers252
Problems with Parts253
Building Bonds with a Supplier254
Building Bonds in the Supply Chain255
13.1Supply-Chain Concept256
13.1.1Supplier-Induced Variability257
13.1.2Core Competency258
13.2The Lean Supply Chain259
13.3Partner Relationships260
13.3.1Purchase Criteria260
13.3.2Design Input261
13.3.3Number of Suppliers261
13.3.4Partner Agreement262
13.3.4.1Price262
13.3.4.2Quality262
13.3.4.3Delivery263
13.3.5Order/Replenishment263
13.3.6Point-of-Use Delivery266
13.4Little Customer, Big Supplier267

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews