These Children Who Come at You with Knives, and Other Fairy Tales

These Children Who Come at You with Knives, and Other Fairy Tales

by Jim Knipfel
3.2 8

Paperback(Original)

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These Children Who Come at You with Knives, and Other Fairy Tales 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
RichardDF More than 1 year ago
...but these fairytales and fables are for us adults, and they are wickedly funny. Starting with the preface (which if you are in the habit of skipping prefaces, do not skip this one!), Jim Knipfel's newest offering cleverly reinvents an old form for a new age and a new audience. These fairy tales still have gnomes, trolls, princesses, even a fully (if somewhat freakishly) cognizant snowman, but they are set on Earth in a time and place that looks suspiciously like our own, and may be poking fun at what's going on around here... hmmm. Anyway. These stories were fun to read regardless of what I got out of them (which was more than just laughs) because I certainly laughed a LOT! I'm looking forward to reading them again and revisiting this twisted fairy land where a horse can sling a gun in a shootout and a gnome can dream a dream beyond the garden... he can dream of world domination! (If none of this makes sense, then you'll just have to read the book! Trust me, it's funny.)
JRTowe More than 1 year ago
I was optimistic when I bought this book. I thought it would be a compilation of dark fairy tales, and in a way, it is. The darkness of the stories is not the problem. The way they all end in disappointment for both the characters and the reader is not the problem. Disappointment seems to be the intended theme here, "This book will disappoint you because it reflects reality, that life is disappointing. Get over it... or don't." All of these elements can have value, even if I don't particularly care for them. However, I found the perpetual condescension unacceptable. Some remarks came from characters, but most came from the narrator. The story of the gnome had strong racist undertones. Other characters were described in condescending ways because of their weight, gender, or disabilities. The word retard and fatty was used prominently. To any reader with a history of being bullied in real life, these stores will cut just like real children coming at them with knives. And maybe some people would find that exhilarating to read, the abandonment of political correctness, the erasing of lines which should not be crossed. To some this book may seem like a brave thing to create. But the truth is, there is nothing brave or new about calling someone fat, or comparing Blacks to gnomes, or making fun of the mentally disabled. It's just not what well-written books do.
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