Trouble the Water

Trouble the Water

by Frances O'Roark Dowell

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Overview

Trouble the Water by Frances O'Roark Dowell

From the award-winning author of Dovey Coe comes a sweeping tale of the friendship between a black girl and a white boy and the prejudices they must overcome in segregated Celeste, Kentucky, as the pair try to solve the mysteries surrounding a lonely old dog.

Eleven-year-old Callie is fearless, stubborn, and a little nosy. So when she sees an old yellow dog wandering around town by itself, you can bet she’s going to figure out who he belongs to. But when her sleuthing leads her to cross paths with a white boy named Wendell who wants to help, the segregated town doesn’t take too kindly to their budding friendship.

Meanwhile, a nearly invisible boy named Jim is stuck in a cabin in the woods. He’s lost his dog, but can’t remember exactly when his pup’s disappeared. When his companion, a little boy named Thomas, who’s been invisible much longer than he, explains that they are ghosts, the two must figure out why they can’t seem to cross the river to the other side just yet…

And as Callie and Wendell’s search for the old dog brings them closer and closer to the cabin in the woods, the simmering prejudices of the townspeople boil over.

Trouble the Water is a story that spans lifetimes, showing that history never truly disappears, and that the past will haunt us until we step up to change the present and stand together for what is right.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781481424646
Publisher: Atheneum/Caitlyn Dlouhy Books
Publication date: 05/23/2017
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 304
Sales rank: 1,227,964
Product dimensions: 5.00(w) x 7.50(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range: 9 - 12 Years

About the Author

Frances O’Roark Dowell is the bestselling and critically acclaimed author of Dovey Coe, which won the Edgar Award and the William Allen White Award; Where I’d Like to Be; The Secret Language of Girls and its sequels The Kind of Friends We Used to Be and The Sound of Your Voice, Only Really Far Away; Chicken Boy; Shooting the Moon, which was awarded the Christopher Medal; the Phineas L. MacGuire series; Falling In; the critically acclaimed The Second Life of Abigail Walker; Anybody Shining; Ten Miles Past Normal; Trouble the Water; and most recently the Sam the Man series. She lives with her family in Durham, North Carolina. Connect with Frances online at FrancesDowell.com.

Read an Excerpt

Trouble the Water

1

The Old Dog


The dog was old and close to dying. He woke slowly now that he was back, the sun warming the ache out of his bones. He had a flickering thought that he’d like to fall asleep and never wake, but he couldn’t die until he knew the boy was safe. So every morning he pushed himself up and sniffed the air for the boy’s scent, and when he didn’t find any trace of it, he started for the river.

Most nights he slept on the woman’s porch, so that he could smell the river, hear the boy’s calls if they came. His first night back, he’d gone to his old house, but when he’d barked, no one had opened the door or called out, “Hey, pup, ready for dinner?” If the boy had been there, he would have answered.

He knew that the woman would give him scraps from the table in a bowl by the door when she saw him, and he knew that if he stayed too long, she’d try to claim him. She’d snapped a collar on him when he showed up the first time, but he’d complained so loudly that she’d finally taken it off. The old dog, like most dogs, couldn’t parse out the particulars of human speech, but he could make sense of what people were telling or asking him from the pitch of their voices, the firmness or wobble of their words, so he’d known the woman wanted him to stay when she’d said, “You’d like it here, I swear you would,” before she put the collar back on a peg just inside the doorway.

The woman lived in the house by herself. No other human smells mixed with hers, no onion stink of a man home from the fields, no sweet scent of a child fresh out of his bath, traces of soap still in his hair, an untouched patch of dirt behind his left ear. The old dog had lived close to humans when he was young, close to the boy, and could sniff one on the air. They each had a particular smell, and there was only one human smell around the woman’s house. It was a nice smell, a mix of river water and new grass and something sweet. The first small flowers of May. He didn’t have words for any of these things, but he knew them.

“Well, hey there, pup,” the woman greeted him now as she emerged from the doorway with a basket in her hand. “I see you stayed for breakfast. Look at you, so slow to get up. Bet you got the arthritis in your bones, old thing like you.”

He followed her around the corner of the house and through the garden gate. “Got to get your vegetables picked first thing of a morning,” the woman informed him as she set to work. “Bugs’ll eat you alive if you come out here at night, skeeters and no-see-ums, they’ll bite you all to pieces. Sun’ll burn you up, you come out at noon. No, first thing of a morning, that’s the best time. That’s when you get things at their freshest.”

As she talked, she pulled tomatoes and squash and cucumbers off their vines and put them in her basket. The old dog sniffed the vegetables without much interest. Sometimes the woman scrambled him a pan of eggs, and cooked a few slices of bacon, and at the last minute threw in leftovers from dinner the night before. He knew all he had to do was follow along as she did her morning chores and chatted to him. The old dog liked the woman. He didn’t mind waiting.

Breakfast this morning turned out to be fried liver mush and cold roasted potatoes. He gulped down the liver in two swallows and sniffed the air for more. “Sorry, pup, you got the last of it,” the woman told him. “Come back tonight, I might have some chicken for you. I’ll take out the bones first, lessen you choke.”

The old dog recognized the sound in her voice as something he’d been feeling so long now it was like a natural-born part of him. It was the sound of something—someone—missing. On his long journey home, his nose in the air, hunting for the boy’s scent, he’d let out a howl now and again, and you could hear that sound in his voice too.

After breakfast he left the woman’s house for the woods and the river, and was almost at the water when he heard a younger dog barking. How far away? Far enough that he couldn’t be sure what—or who—the younger dog was growling at. Maybe the old dog, but probably not. He understood other dogs even better than he understood humans. Still, he took cover.

When he sensed the danger was past, he slowly took to his feet again. Should he go back to the woman’s house, rest under the cool shade of her front porch? When the sun got low enough in the sky, she’d come out to keep him company, and he liked that, liked her voice as it went up and down and drifted through his dreams.

He was about to turn around when a feeling seized him, shot through his chest and around his ears like a winter wind. Follow the dog, the feeling told him. Sniffing the air, he understood. It wasn’t just a dog in the woods; the wind carried the scent of a boy. And though he knew it wasn’t his boy, maybe this boy could lead him to his boy.

The old dog was dying. He knew he was dying. He knew he didn’t have much time. He turned and headed deep into the woods.

Reading Group Guide

A Reading Group Guide to

Trouble the Water

By Frances O’Roark Dowell

About the Book

Eleven-year-old Callie is fearless, stubborn, and a little nosy. So when she sees an old yellow dog wandering around town by itself, you can bet she’s going to figure out who he belongs to. But when her sleuthing leads her to cross paths with a white boy named Wendell who wants to help, the segregated town doesn’t take too kindly to their budding friendship.

Meanwhile, a nearly invisible boy named Jim is stuck in a cabin in the woods. He’s lost his dog, but can’t remember exactly when his pup’s disappeared. When his companion, a little boy named Thomas, who’s been invisible much longer than he, explains that they are ghosts, the two must figure out why they can’t seem to cross the river to the other side just yet . . ..

As Callie and Wendell’s search for the old dog brings them closer and closer to the cabin in the woods, the simmering prejudices of the townspeople boil over.

Trouble the Water is a story that spans lifetimes, showing that history never truly disappears, and that the past will haunt us until we step up to change the present and stand together for what is right.

Discussion Questions

1. Trouble the Water takes place in Celeste, Kentucky. Describe the setting of the story.

2. Characterize Callie. How does she first encounter the old dog and why is she interested in him?

3. Describe how Callie and Wendell meet. Do they become friends at first?

4. Who is Carl Jr.? Discuss his role in the story and his relationship with Callie.

5. Describe the cabin. Why are Callie and Wendell interested in it? What lore surrounds the cabin?

6. Discuss how Callie and Wendell are alike and how they are different. Use evidence to support your discussion.

7. Jim is "nearly invisible." Discuss what has happened to him. Does Buddy recognize him? Explain.

8. Who is Mr. Renfrow? Why does he want to help Callie?

9. Callie and Wendell develop a friendship. How does their friendship create unrest in the community? Are either of them concerned about how they are viewed by those in the community?

10. The author uses a third-person point of view in telling the story. What advantage does this offer the story? Reference examples in your response.

11. Identify one of the story’s themes. Explain how the author develops the theme by using evidence from the text.

12. Define segregation. Reference examples of segregation in the story. In what ways do Callie and Wendell defy community expectations?

13. Why does Callie take Wendell with her to visit Jim's mother? How does Jim’s mother respond to the news about Buddy?

14. How does Jim end up living in the cabin? Why does he stay there? Why does he never return to his home?

15. What historical background does the novel provide about race relations? Is racial tension an issue in society today?

Extension Activities

1. Create a character map of either Callie or Wendell. Use evidence from the text to identify key words that describe either character. Share your final product with the class.

2. Identify the time period of the story. Then investigate race relations in rural communities at this time. Prepare a media presentation or essay that explains ways in which the book paints a historical picture of this time period.

3. An epilogue is a follow-up to a book that serves to “wrap up” aspects of a story that are not resolved by story’s end. Reread the last scenes that involve Buddy and Jim; then write an epilogue in which Jim and Buddy are reunited. Share your epilogue with others in your class.

4. Talk with others in your community and identify a piece of local folklore, legend, or little known history. Conduct your own investigative reporting surrounding the topic and write up a newspaper article detailing what you find. You might, instead, work as a class to develop a website or wiki page where you can host multiple pieces of community folklore and history.

5. Personification is a literary element in which human qualities are given to objects, animals, or ideas. Identify a favorite scene in the story featuring Buddy. Rewrite that scene from Buddy’s perspective using first-person point of view.

Guide written in 2016 by Pam B. Cole, Ph.D., Associate Dean and Professor of English Education and Literacy, Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, GA.

This guide has been provided by Simon & Schuster for classroom, library, and reading group use. It may be reproduced in its entirety or excerpted for these purposes.

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