Two Nations: Black & White, Hostile, Separate, and Unequal

Two Nations: Black & White, Hostile, Separate, and Unequal

by Andrew Hacker
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Overview

Two Nations: Black & White, Hostile, Separate, and Unequal by Andrew Hacker

Why, despite continued efforts to increase understanding and expand opportunities, do black and white Americans still lead separate lives, continually marked by tension and hostility? In his much-lauded classic, newly updated to reflect the changing realities of race in our nation, Andrew Hacker explains the origins and meaning of racism and clarifies the conflicting theories of equality and inferiority. He paints a stark picture of racial inequality in America — focusing on family life, education, income, and employment — and explores the current controversies over politics, crime, and the causes of the gap between the races. Illuminating and oftentimes startling, Two Nations demonstrates how race has defined America's history and will continue to shape its future.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780743238243
Publisher: Scribner
Publication date: 04/29/2003
Pages: 288
Sales rank: 509,748
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.43(h) x 0.80(d)

About the Author

Andrew Hacker is a professor of political science at Queens College in New York City. He is the author of Mismatch and Money, as well as eight other books, and is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, Time, and Fortune, among other periodicals. Mr. Hacker lives in New York City.

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Two Nations: Black & White, Hostile, Separate, and Unequal 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was recommended to me by a college roommate who enjoyed it greatly. I let it sit on my shelf for years (I read the earlier version, pub. 1990) and finally picked it up last month. I thought it was dry, even for a statistical analysis. Also, I was disappointed that the author often made opinionated statements that could not be statistically justified (these can be found on almost every page of the book, especially when Hacker asserts what black or white people THINK about certain things -- last I checked, he's not clairvoyant). That said, there are some truly eye-opening examples that Hacker springs throughout the text. I was especially impressed by the graph sorting SAT scores by race and income levels -- I had heard of the 'white bias' but this chart really brought the point home. Perhaps my greatest disappointment was the lack of suggestions for improvement. It's no fun getting all fired up and ready to act, then have no idea what to do. I really wish more people would be interested in the topic of racial equality, but unfortunately the people who will read this book are not the ones who need it the most.
Guest More than 1 year ago
'Two Nations' is a powerful expose because the ideas posited in its text are so widely unknown(by the general public). The dysrythmnia between the black and white societies has become for the most part(for blacks) simply a dull ache and not an acute call for continued investigation/research, and thoughtful proaction.I submit that as more individuals become aware of the validity of the information stated in this volume that the current pastorale paced effort being placed by both the black and white communities in looking at and addressing the real reasons behind our shared dis harmony will be redoubled. (as a result of concrete facts and not vague dis information) Please, wether you are black or white,read this important information;inquire,discuss,understand... Reach out and touch everyone in your life that is important to you and tell them about this book. Sincerely, David K. Myers