The Waste Land and Other Poems (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

The Waste Land and Other Poems (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781593082796
Publisher: Barnes & Noble
Publication date: 03/01/2005
Series: Barnes & Noble Classics Series
Pages: 160
Sales rank: 50,594
Product dimensions: 5.18(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.40(d)

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From Randy Malamud’s Introduction to The Waste Land and Other Poems

If we regard Eliot’s first two collections as thesis/antithesis, then the synthesis was accompanied by (and probably in many ways facilitated by) a personal breakdown in 1921. The Waste Land is a record of the poet’s collapse, as well as the sign of his recovery. As he traveled back from Switzerland, where he had undergone treatment, to resume his life in England, Eliot left a draft of the poem in Paris for Ezra Pound to edit. The poem records a nervous breakdown, but more importantly it recounts how the poet imposes a sense of order, coherence, and direction on the cacophonous chaos of the breakdown.

Explicitly, the breakdown in The Waste Land is meant to be the breakdown of Europe, but increasingly critics have come to realize that it is also the very personal account of Eliot’s own psychological distress. In part III, for example, he writes, “‘On Margate Sands. / I can connect / Nothing with nothing.’” The beach at Margate was where Eliot had vacationed, following a friend’s advice, in an attempt to avert his breakdown; but the holiday did not ameliorate his situation and prompted him to seek the therapeutic assistance of a Lausanne psychologist, Dr. Henri Vittoz. And when the voice of the poem states (in an unusual first-person address) in line 182, “By the waters of Leman I sat down and wept . . .” Eliot is describing the simple, powerful nadir of his breakdown: Leman is the old name for Lake Geneva, which Lausanne overlooks. Although Eliot always resisted autobiographical readings of art, the poem inescapably invites such readings. In the closing lines, when Eliot writes “These fragments I have shored against my ruins,” it seems impossible not to read that as a description of how Eliot’s embrace and desperate association of the shards that comprise the poem have helped to stave off his psychological “ruins.” The act of assembling these pieces of the European cultural tradition served as a bulwark against the intellectual collapse—in both his public and private worlds—that seemed so imminent.

On the national level, the breakdown Eliot envisioned was a consequence of the state of Europe during and after the Great War. More personally, the poem can be read as an account from the trenches of a poet who, though he didn’t actually fight in that war, fought and survived his own metaphorical war. (Critics have speculated that Virginia Woolf’s Septimus Smith, the shell-shocked poet manqué in Mrs. Dalloway, was at least loosely inspired by her erstwhile friend Tom.)

The Waste Land achieves a synthesis between the free-floating observations of Prufrock and the anguished, surreal pretensions of Poems 1920. The philosophical/intellectual praxis of Eliot’s modern epic is less gratuitous, and more pragmatic, than what he propounded in his previous collection—still difficult and harsh, certainly, but in a way that lent itself (at least for Eliot’s initiates, his devotees) to solving, working through. If Poems 1920 was (and was meant to be) off-putting, The Waste Land was somehow, despite itself, addictively compelling. The themes, the tropes, the images, the aesthetic that Eliot created in that poem are still going strong, inescapably etched into our cultural consciousness nearly a century later. (For example, it is virtually impossible to read any newspaper in any April without a headline recalling that it is “the cruelest month.”) Eliot postulated that the modern landscape looked harsh, hostile, crazy, fragmented, with the monuments of the past tormenting us amid our present unworthiness and inadequacy, and apparently he was right.

A first-time reader confronted with The Waste Land must determine, at the outset, how to read the poem: how to assimilate it and make sense of it. It is, of course, “modern,” so one approaches it with the same understanding of modern aesthetics that one brings to Picasso’s cubism, or Stravinsky’s symphonies, or Diaghilev’s dance. One allows that the apparent chaos of the work, the difficulty, the excess, is in some way mimetic of the dazzling and sometimes incoherent world outside; and also that things will not be presented in a neat, clear narrative structure, because anything too conventional or too easily accessible would be consequently trite—one must work hard to glean important insights from the modern zeitgeist. Modernists believed that the more complex a text is, the more likely it is to do justice to the complexity of the world outside, a world that in the space of one generation is awakening to cinema, telephones, automobiles, airplanes, world war, and so forth.

The poem suggests many schemes or models—probably far too many—that offer aids to comprehension. Some of these come from Eliot’s own critical apparatus: The notes at the end of the poem, for example, promise insights. The endnotes were not included with the first two periodical publications of the poem—in The Criterion (London) in October 1922 and in The Dial (New York) the next month; they appeared only with the first book edition. Eliot once said that the publishers of this edition “wanted a larger volume and the notes were the only available matter,” and in a 1957 lecture he referred to them as a “remarkable exposition of bogus scholarship.” In fact, the notes vary greatly in relevance and usefulness.

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The Waste Land and Other Poems (Barnes & Noble Classics Series) 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 111 reviews.
TheQuillPen More than 1 year ago
One of the smallest of the B&N Classics, The Waste Land and Other Poems nevertheless contains some of the best poetry of the 20th century and, quite frankly, of all time. Eliot's Ezra Pound-inspired style utterly enhances the cold, sterile, occasionally Kafkaesque mood of his early poetry, and this volume contains Eliot's preeminent early work: "Prufrock and Other Observations," "Poems 1920," and, of course, "The Waste Land," a masterpiece of modernist literature. Highly influential even today, Eliot's cynical description of a cold, harsh modern world raises pertinent philisophical questions about the human condition, as well as our world today. Eliot's penetrating observations are enhanced by his brusque and often aloof style of poetry, a style punctuated by significant pauses and characterized by short, fragmented lines, as well as varying rhyme scheme (when applicable) and diverse meter. This little book provides an excellent introduction to T.S. Eliot in general, but "The Waste Land" alone is worth your money. Absolutely influential and simply stunning--oh, and Eliot's vocabulary is masterful!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
THIS is poetry, and very little even approaching it has been written in the past several decades. Hard work, years of it, went into the writing, and luckily several good critics have written on Eliot's work and have explicated, amplifying the reader's experience. If you're looking for rawness, explicit sex, self-absorbed confessionals, random ambiguity and "It can mean one thing to you and something else to me, that's why it's so great," don't even open the book. Eliot wrote distilled thought in precisely appropriate words and language, and in rhythms in the text as deep as ground waves in the sea. Much of the material he uses or refers to in his work is no longer part of anyone's intellectual repertoire today, except academics'. But books about his poetry will fill in those blanks. The work is worth it.
tloeffler on LibraryThing 3 days ago
I like Eliot's work in general, and I was not aware that The Waste Land was a World War I poem, which gave it a different perspective than I had the first time I read it.
ellevee on LibraryThing 3 months ago
Eliot is one of the most casually devastating poets in history. "This is the way the world ends."His work gets more profound with each reading.
daizylee on LibraryThing 3 months ago
Also includes Prufrock and "La Figlia Che Piange," one of my favorite poems.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Agree formatting is bad...poems good...why side numbers---stupid!
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JFillingham More than 1 year ago
I am a big fan of Eliot, but I found the formatting of this book frustrating. I really wanted to have a collection of his works for my Nook, so I thought this would work. After getting it, I have found the formatting of the poems frustrating. I wish someone would fix this.
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