A Face without a Heart

A Face without a Heart

by Rick R. Reed

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781635332629
Publisher: Dreamspinner Press
Publication date: 01/31/2017
Pages: 200
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.42(d)

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A Face without a Heart 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
V-Rundell More than 1 year ago
Gary Adrion is a young man of incomparable beauty, spotted on the "L" train in Chicago by an artist, Liam Howard, who specializes in holograms. Liam is a little older, and not as attractive as Gary, but Gary-a mostly solitary trust fund kid-is intrigued by Liam's work and agrees to sit for a piece. The result is astounding, and Gary is so taken with it, that he makes an inadvertent bargain to remain as fresh and youthful as his hologram, no matter the darkness and depravity of his actions. Well, over the years Gary gets pretty dark, and awfully depraved. Egged on by Liam's dear friend, an outgoing drag queen known as Henrietta, Gary's life takes some disastrous turns. He thinks he finds love, and throws it away on a whim--which leads to deadly results. Liam acts as Gary's conscience, taking him to task when Gary will let him near, and that's not a good situation, either. The further down this rabbit hole Gary falls, the more his hologram absorbs the horror of his actions, turning from an objet d'arte into a grotesque. Meanwhile Gary never seems to age a day. Friends turn bitter and enmity is rampant, even among his hangers-on. Gary delights in beauty, and it's ultimate corruption. This isn't a romance, which I knew going in. There is some sex, but it's written for shock value and the effect is chilling, not amorous. As we know from the Oscar Wilde classic, Dorian Gray--our narcissistic Gary--never fully redeems his soul, despite knowing that he must if he's ever to find peace from the ghosts of people that have died as a result of his actions--directly or indirectly. There's lots of drug use, and a seedy club-kid-type vibe for some of the book, and there's horror. Death and murder are part of Gary's path, and the only end is the dramatic one we all know is coming. As a psychological thriller, I'd have loved just a little more insight into what happened during the large gaps in time the book spans. Some people seemingly come from nowhere, particularly in the end, and I know they were a part of that murkiness. I also got that Liam sensed Gary's menace from their first encounter, but I didn't see where that came from, as a reader. Gary is definitely shady, but I'd have liked to know how and why we knew that from the first pages. That said, as a retelling of Dorian Gray, I wasn't disappointed.