Aesop's Fables

Aesop's Fables

by Aesop, Laura Gibbs
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Overview

Aesop's Fables by Aesop

This new translation is the first to represent all the main fable collections in ancient Latin and Greek derived from the legendary Aesop, arranged according to the fables' contents and themes. It includes 600 fables, many of which come from sources never before translated into English.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780191606281
Publisher: OUP Oxford
Publication date: 07/18/2002
Series: Oxford World's Classics Series
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Sales rank: 976,386
File size: 2 MB

About the Author

Aesop (Aesopus) was an ancient Greek storyteller believed to have lived circa 620–564 BCE. Although there is no formal documentation of his existence, Greek historians Aristotle and Herodotus portray Aesop as a slave who was freed after acting as an advocate for a wealthy Samian. No written works directly attributed to Aesop remain, and the fables he is credited as writing were collected both over a vast period of time and in many languages. The date of Aesop’s death is unknown, although many written stories, including those from Plutarch, claim that he was executed by the Delphians while attending to diplomatic matters in Delphi.

Read an Excerpt

Aesop's Fables


By Aesop

OPEN ROAD INTEGRATED MEDIA

Copyright © 2014 Open Road Integrated Media, Inc.
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-4976-7204-8


CHAPTER 1

THE FOX AND THE GRAPES


A hungry Fox saw some fine bunches of Grapes hanging from a vine that was trained along a high trellis, and did his best to reach them by jumping as high as he could into the air. But it was all in vain, for they were just out of reach: so he gave up trying, and walked away with an air of dignity and unconcern, remarking, "I thought those Grapes were ripe, but I see now they are quite sour."


THE GOOSE THAT LAID THE GOLDEN EGGS

A Man and his Wife had the good fortune to possess a Goose which laid a Golden Egg every day. Lucky though they were, they soon began to think they were not getting rich fast enough, and, imagining the bird must be made of gold inside, they decided to kill it in order to secure the whole store of precious metal at once. But when they cut it open they found it was just like any other goose. Thus, they neither got rich all at once, as they had hoped, nor enjoyed any longer the daily addition to their wealth.


THE CAT AND THE MICE

There was once a house that was overrun with Mice. A Cat heard of this, and said to herself, "That's the place for me," and off she went and took up her quarters in the house, and caught the Mice one by one and ate them. At last the Mice could stand it no longer, and they determined to take to their holes and stay there. "That's awkward," said the Cat to herself: "the only thing to do is to coax them out by a trick." So she considered a while, and then climbed up the wall and let herself hang down by her hind legs from a peg, and pretended to be dead. By and by a Mouse peeped out and saw the Cat hanging there. "Aha!" it cried, "you're very clever, madam, no doubt: but you may turn yourself into a bag of meal hanging there, if you like, yet you won't catch us coming anywhere near you."


THE MISCHIEVOUS DOG

There was once a Dog who used to snap at people and bite them without any provocation, and who was a great nuisance to every one who came to his master's house. So his master fastened a bell round his neck to warn people of his presence. The Dog was very proud of the bell, and strutted about tinkling it with immense satisfaction. But an old dog came up to him and said, "The fewer airs you give yourself the better, my friend. You don't think, do you, that your bell was given you as a reward of merit? On the contrary, it is a badge of disgrace."


THE CHARCOAL-BURNER AND THE FULLER

There was once a Charcoal-burner who lived and worked by himself. A Fuller, however, happened to come and settle in the same neighbourhood; and the Charcoal-burner, having made his acquaintance and finding he was an agreeable sort of fellow, asked him if he would come and share his house: "We shall get to know one another better that way," he said, "and, beside, our household expenses will be diminished." The Fuller thanked him, but replied, "I couldn't think of it, sir: why, everything I take such pains to whiten would be blackened in no time by your charcoal."


THE MICE IN COUNCIL

Once upon a time all the Mice met together in Council, and discussed the best means of securing themselves against the attacks of the cat. After several suggestions had been debated, a Mouse of some standing and experience got up and said, "I think I have hit upon a plan which will ensure our safety in the future, provided you approve and carry it out. It is that we should fasten a bell round the neck of our enemy the cat, which will by its tinkling warn us of her approach." This proposal was warmly applauded, and it had been already decided to adopt it, when an old Mouse got upon his feet and said, "I agree with you all that the plan before us is an admirable one: but may I ask who is going to bell the cat?"


THE BAT AND THE WEASELS

A Bat fell to the ground and was caught by a Weasel, and was just going to be killed and eaten when it begged to be let go. The Weasel said he couldn't do that because he was an enemy of all birds on principle. "Oh, but," said the Bat, "I'm not a bird at all: I'm a mouse." "So you are," said the Weasel, "now I come to look at you"; and he let it go. Some time after this the Bat was caught in just the same way by another Weasel, and, as before, begged for its life. "No," said the Weasel, "I never let a mouse go by any chance." "But I'm not a mouse," said the Bat; "I'm a bird." "Why, so you are," said the Weasel; and he too let the Bat go.


THE DOG AND THE SOW

A Dog and a Sow were arguing and each claimed that its own young ones were finer than those of any other animal. "Well," said the Sow at last, "mine can see, at any rate, when they come into the world: but yours are born blind."


THE FOX AND THE CROW

A Crow was sitting on a branch of a tree with a piece of cheese in her beak when a Fox observed her and set his wits to work to discover some way of getting the cheese. Coming and standing under the tree he looked up and said, "What a noble bird I see above me! Her beauty is without equal, the hue of her plumage exquisite. If only her voice is as sweet as her looks are fair, she ought without doubt to be Queen of the Birds." The Crow was hugely flattered by this, and just to show the Fox that she could sing she gave a loud caw. Down came the cheese, of course, and the Fox, snatching it up, said, "You have a voice, madam, I see: what you want is wits."


THE HORSE AND THE GROOM

There was once a Groom who used to spend long hours clipping and combing the Horse of which he had charge, but who daily stole a portion of his allowance of oats, and sold it for his own profit. The Horse gradually got into worse and worse condition, and at last cried to the Groom, "If you really want me to look sleek and well, you must comb me less and feed me more."


THE WOLF AND THE LAMB

A Wolf came upon a Lamb straying from the flock, and felt some compunction about taking the life of so helpless a creature without some plausible excuse; so he cast about for a grievance and said at last, "Last year, sirrah, you grossly insulted me." "That is impossible, sir," bleated the Lamb, "for I wasn't born then." "Well," retorted the Wolf, "you feed in my pastures." "That cannot be," replied the Lamb, "for I have never yet tasted grass." "You drink from my spring, then," continued the Wolf. "Indeed, sir," said the poor Lamb, "I have never yet drunk anything but my mother's milk." "Well, anyhow," said the Wolf, "I'm not going without my dinner": and he sprang upon the Lamb and devoured it without more ado.


THE PEACOCK AND THE CRANE

A Peacock taunted a Crane with the dullness of her plumage. "Look at my brilliant colours," said she, "and see how much finer they are than your poor feathers." "I am not denying," replied the Crane, "that yours are far gayer than mine; but when it comes to flying I can soar into the clouds, whereas you are confined to the earth like any dunghill cock."


THE CAT AND THE BIRDS

A Cat heard that the Birds in an aviary were ailing. So he got himself up as a doctor, and, taking with him a set of the instruments proper to his profession, presented himself at the door, and inquired after the health of the Birds. "We shall do very well," they replied, without letting him in, "when we've seen the last of you."


THE SPENDTHRIFT AND THE SWALLOW

A Spendthrift, who had wasted his fortune, and had nothing left but the clothes in which he stood, saw a Swallow one fine day in early spring. Thinking that summer had come, and that he could now do without his coat, he went and sold it for what it would fetch. A change, however, took place in the weather, and there came a sharp frost which killed the unfortunate Swallow. When the Spendthrift saw its dead body he cried, "Miserable bird! Thanks to you I am perishing of cold myself."


THE OLD WOMAN AND THE DOCTOR

An Old Woman became almost totally blind from a disease of the eyes, and, after consulting a Doctor, made an agreement with him in the presence of witnesses that she should pay him a high fee if he cured her, while if he failed he was to receive nothing. The Doctor accordingly prescribed a course of treatment, and every time he paid her a visit he took away with him some article out of the house, until at last, when he visited her for the last time, and the cure was complete, there was nothing left. When the Old Woman saw that the house was empty she refused to pay him his fee; and, after repeated refusals on her part, he sued her before the magistrates for payment of her debt. On being brought into court she was ready with her defence. "The claimant," said she, "has stated the facts about our agreement correctly. I undertook to pay him a fee if he cured me, and he, on his part, promised to charge nothing if he failed. Now, he says I am cured; but I say that I am blinder than ever, and I can prove what I say. When my eyes were bad I could at any rate see well enough to be aware that my house contained a certain amount of furniture and other things; but now, when according to him I am cured, I am entirely unable to see anything there at all."


THE MOON AND HER MOTHER

The Moon once begged her Mother to make her a gown. "How can I?" replied she; "there's no fitting your figure. At one time you're a New Moon, and at another you're a Full Moon; and between whiles you're neither one nor the other."


MERCURY AND THE WOODMAN

A Woodman was felling a tree on the bank of a river, when his axe, glancing off the trunk, flew out of his hands and fell into the water. As he stood by the water's edge lamenting his loss, Mercury appeared and asked him the reason for his grief; and on learning what had happened, out of pity for his distress he dived into the river and, bringing up a golden axe, asked him if that was the one he had lost. The Woodman replied that it was not, and Mercury then dived a second time, and, bringing up a silver axe, asked if that was his. "No, that is not mine either," said the Woodman. Once more Mercury dived into the river, and brought up the missing axe. The Woodman was overjoyed at recovering his property, and thanked his benefactor warmly; and the latter was so pleased with his honesty that he made him a present of the other two axes. When the Woodman told the story to his companions, one of these was filled with envy of his good fortune and determined to try his luck for himself. So he went and began to fell a tree at the edge of the river, and presently contrived to let his axe drop into the water. Mercury appeared as before, and, on learning that his axe had fallen in, he dived and brought up a golden axe, as he had done on the previous occasion. Without waiting to be asked whether it was his or not the fellow cried, "That's mine, that's mine," and stretched out his hand eagerly for the prize: but Mercury was so disgusted at his dishonesty that he not only declined to give him the golden axe, but also refused to recover for him the one he had let fall into the stream.


THE ASS, THE FOX, AND THE LION

An Ass and a Fox went into partnership and sallied out to forage for food together. They hadn't gone far before they saw a Lion coming their way, at which they were both dreadfully frightened. But the Fox thought he saw a way of saving his own skin, and went boldly up to the Lion and whispered in his ear, "I'll manage that you shall get hold of the Ass without the trouble of stalking him, if you'll promise to let me go free." The Lion agreed to this, and the Fox then rejoined his companion and contrived before long to lead him by a hidden pit, which some hunter had dug as a trap for wild animals, and into which he fell. When the Lion saw that the Ass was safely caught and couldn't get away, it was to the Fox that he first turned his attention, and he soon finished him off, and then at his leisure proceeded to feast upon the Ass.


THE LION AND THE MOUSE

A Lion asleep in his lair was waked up by a Mouse running over his face. Losing his temper he seized it with his paw and was about to kill it. The Mouse, terrified, piteously entreated him to spare its life. "Please let me go," it cried, "and one day I will repay you for your kindness." The idea of so insignificant a creature ever being able to do anything for him amused the Lion so much that he laughed aloud, and good-humouredly let it go. But the Mouse's chance came, after all. One day the Lion got entangled in a net which had been spread for game by some hunters, and the Mouse heard and recognised his roars of anger and ran to the spot. Without more ado it set to work to gnaw the ropes with its teeth, and succeeded before long in setting the Lion free. "There!" said the Mouse, "you laughed at me when I promised I would repay you: but now you see, even a Mouse can help a Lion."


THE CROW AND THE PITCHER

A thirsty Crow found a Pitcher with some water in it, but so little was there that, try as she might, she could not reach it with her beak, and it seemed as though she would die of thirst within sight of the remedy. At last she hit upon a clever plan. She began dropping pebbles into the Pitcher, and with each pebble the water rose a little higher until at last it reached the brim, and the knowing bird was enabled to quench her thirst.


THE BOYS AND THE FROGS

Some mischievous Boys were playing on the edge of a pond, and, catching sight of some Frogs swimming about in the shallow water, they began to amuse themselves by pelting them with stones, and they killed several of them. At last one of the Frogs put his head out of the water and said, "Oh, stop! stop! I beg of you: what is sport to you is death to us."


THE NORTH WIND AND THE SUN

A dispute arose between the North Wind and the Sun, each claiming that he was stronger than the other. At last they agreed to try their powers upon a traveller, to see which could soonest strip him of his cloak. The North Wind had the first try; and, gathering up all his force for the attack, he came whirling furiously down upon the man, and caught up his cloak as though he would wrest it from him by one single effort: but the harder he blew, the more closely the man wrapped it round himself. Then came the turn of the Sun. At first he beamed gently upon the traveller, who soon unclasped his cloak and walked on with it hanging loosely about his shoulders: then he shone forth in his full strength, and the man, before he had gone many steps, was glad to throw his cloak right off and complete his journey more lightly clad.


THE MISTRESS AND HER SERVANTS

A Widow, thrifty and industrious, had two servants, whom she kept pretty hard at work. They were not allowed to lie long abed in the mornings, but the old lady had them up and doing as soon as the cock crew. They disliked intensely having to get up at such an hour, especially in winter-time: and they thought that if it were not for the cock waking up their Mistress so horribly early, they could sleep longer. So they caught it and wrung its neck. But they weren't prepared for the consequences. For what happened was that their Mistress, not hearing the cock crow as usual, waked them up earlier than ever, and set them to work in the middle of the night.


THE GOODS AND THE ILLS

There was a time in the youth of the world when Goods and Ills entered equally into the concerns of men, so that the Goods did not prevail to make them altogether blessed, nor the Ills to make them wholly miserable. But owing to the foolishness of mankind the Ills multiplied greatly in number and increased in strength, until it seemed as though they would deprive the Goods of all share in human affairs, and banish them from the earth. The latter, therefore, betook themselves to heaven and complained to Jupiter of the treatment they had received, at the same time praying him to grant them protection from the Ills, and to advise them concerning the manner of their intercourse with men. Jupiter granted their request for protection, and decreed that for the future they should not go among men openly in a body, and so be liable to attack from the hostile Ills, but singly and unobserved, and at infrequent and unexpected intervals. Hence it is that the earth is full of Ills, for they come and go as they please and are never far away; while Goods, alas! come one by one only, and have to travel all the way from heaven, so that they are very seldom seen.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Aesop's Fables by Aesop. Copyright © 2014 Open Road Integrated Media, Inc.. Excerpted by permission of OPEN ROAD INTEGRATED MEDIA.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

Aesop's FablesA Note on the Text and Illustrations

Introduction

I. The Fox and the Grapes
II. The Wolf and the Crane
III. The Archer and the Lion
IV. The Woman and the Fat Hen
V. The Kid and the Wolf
VI. The Hawk and the Pigeons
VII. The Eagle and the Fox
VIII. The Boy and the Scorpion
IX. The Fox and the Goat
X. The Old Hound
XI. The Ants and the Grasshopper
XII. The Fawn and Her Mother
XIII. The Horse and the Groom
XIV. The Mountain in Labor
XV. The Flies and the Honey Jar
XVI. The Two Bags
XVII. The Vain Crow
XVIII. The Wolf and the Lamb
XIX. The Bear and the Fox
XX. The Dog, the Cock and the Fox
XXI. The Cock and the Jewel
XXII. The Sea Gull and the Hawk
XXIII. The Fox and the Lion
XXIV. The Creaking Wheels
XXV. The Frog and the Ox
XXVI. The Farmer and the Snake
XXVII. The Lion and the Fox
XXVIII. The Fisherman and His Music
XXIX. The Domesticated Dog and the Wolf
XXX. The Country Mouse and the Town Mouse
XXXI. The Dog and the Shadow
XXXII. The Moon and Her Mother
XXXIII. The Fighting Cocks and the Eagle
XXXIV. The Man and the Satyr
XXXV. The Tortoise and the Eagle
XXXVI. The Mule
XXXVII. The Hen and the Cat
XXXVIII. The Old Woman and the Wine Bottle
XXXIX. The Hare and the Tortoise
XL. The Ass and the Grasshopper
XLI. The Lamb and the Camel
XLII. The Crab and Its Mother
XLIII. Jupiter and the Camel
XLIV. The Mouse and the Frog
XLV. The Shepherd Boy and the Wolf
XLVI. The Peach, the Apple, and the Blackberry
XLVII. The Hare and the Hound
XLVIII. The Stag in the Ox Stall
XLIX. The Crow and the Pitcher
L. The Lion and the Mouse
LI. The One-Eyed Doe
LII. The Trees and the Ax
LIII. The Lion, the Ass, and the Fox Who Went Hunting
LIV. The Travelers and the Bear
LV. The Belly and the Members
LVI. The Dolphins and the Sprat
LVII. The Blind Man and the Whelp
LVIII. The Sick Stag
LIX. Hercules and the Wagoner
LX. The Fox and the Woodcutter
LXI. The Monkey and the Camel
LXII. The Dove and the Crow
LXIII. The Ass and the Lap Dog
LXIV. The Hares and the Frogs
LXV. The Fisherman and the Little Fish
LXVI. The Wind and the Sun
LXVII. The Farmer and the Stork
LXVIII. The Lioness
LXIX. The Brash Candlelight
LXX. The Old Woman and the Physician
LXXI. The Charcoal-Burner and the Cloth-Fuller
LXXII. The Wolf and the Sheep
LXXIII. The Farmer and His Sons
LXXIV. The Wolves and the Sheep
LXXV. The Mole and Her Mother
LXXVI. The Swallow and the Crow
LXXVII. The Man Bitten by a Dog
LXXVIII. The Man and the Lion
LXXIX. The Monkey and the Dolphin
LXXXI. The Viper and the File
LXXXII. The Bundle of Sticks
LXXXIII. Jupiter, Neptune, Minerva, and Momus
LXXXIV. The Lion in Love
LXXXV. The Nurse and the Wolf
LXXXVI. The Birdcatcher and the Lark
LXXXVII. Jupiter and the Bee
LXXXVIII. The Travelers and the Plane Tree
LXXXIX. The Fox Without a Tail
XC. The Horse and the Stag
XCI. The Mischievous Dog
XCII. The Geese and the Cranes
XCIII. The Quack Frog
XCIV. Mercury and the Woodcutter
XCV. The Oxen and the Butchers
XCVI. The Goatherd and the Goats
XCVII. The Widow and the Sheep
XCVIII. The Marriage of the Sun
XCIX. The Theif and His Mother
C. The Gnat and the Bull
CI. The Lion, the Bear, and the Fox
CII. The Oak and the Reed
CIII. The Dog in the Manger
CIV. The Goose with the Golden Eggs
CV. The Lion and the Dolphin
CVI. The Comedian and the Farmer
CVII. The Dog Invited to Supper
CVIII. The Ass Loaded with Salt
CIX. The Theif and the Dog
CX. The Trumpeter Taken Prisoner
CXI. The Hunter and the Fisherman
CXII. The Fir Tree and the Bramble
CXIII. The Eagle and the Arrow
CXIV. The Two Pets
CXV. The Fisherman and Troubled Water
CXVI. The Lark and Her Young Ones
CXVII. The Arab and the Camel
CXVIII. The Travelers and the Hatchet
CXIX. The Doctor and His Patient
CXX. The Maid and the Pail of Milk
CXXI. The Ass, the Fox, and the Lion
CXXII. The Ass and His Driver
CXXIII. The Travelers and the Hatchet
CXXIV. The Hedge and the Vineyard
CXXV. The Frogs Who Desired a King
CXXVI. The Lion and the Goat
CXXVII. The Mice in Council
CXXVIII. The Fox and the Mask
CXXIX. The Thirsty Pigeon
CXXX. The Farmer and the Cranes
CXXXI. The Falconer and the Partridge
CXXXII. The Cat and the Mice
CXXXIII. The Father and His Two Daughters
CXXXIV. The Heifer and the Ox
CXXXV. The Fox and the Hedgehog
CXXXVI. The Lion and the Ass
CXXXVII. The Bald Knight
CXXXVIII. The Ass and His Masters
CXXXIX. The Farmer and the Sea
CXL. The Hart and the Vine
CXLI. The Pig and the Sheep
CXLII. The Bull and the Goat
CXLIII. The Old Man and Death
CXLIV. The Dog and the Hare
CXLV. The Boy and the Hazel Nuts
CXLVI. The Wolf and the Shepherd
CXLVII. The Jackass and the Statue
CXLVIII. The Blacksmith and His Dog
CXLIX. The Herdsman and the Lost Calf
CL. The Lion and the Other Beasts Who Went Out Hunting
CLI. The Bees, the Drones, and the Wasp
CLII. The Kid and the Piping Ass
CLIII. The Stallion and the Ass
CLIV. The Mice and the Weasels
CLV. The Stubborn Goat and the Goatherd
CLVI. The Boys and the Frogs
CLVII. The Mouse and the Weasel
CLVIII. The Farmer and the Lion
CLIX. The Horse and the Loaded Ass
CLX. The Wolf and the Lion
CLXI. The Farmer and the Dogs
CLXII. The Eagle and the Crow
CLXIII. The Lion and His Three Councillors
CLXIV. The Great and Little Fish
CLXV. The Ass, the Cock, and the Lion
CLXVI. The Wolf and the Goat
CLXVII. The Fox and the Stork
CLXVIII. The Leopard and the Fox
CLXIX. The Vine and the Goat
CLXX. The Sick Lion
CLXXI. The Rivers and the Sea
CLXXII. The Blackamoor
CLXXIII. The Boy and the Nettle
CLXXIV. The Seaside Travelers
CLXXV. The Boy Who Went Swimming
CLXXVI. The Sick Hawk
CLXXVII. The Monkey and the Fisherman
CLXXVIII. Venus and the Cat
CLXXIX. The Three Tradesmen
CLXXX. The Ass's Shadow
CLXXXI. The Eagle and the Beetle
CLXXXII. The Lion and the Three Bulls
CLXXXIII. The Old Woman and Her Maids
CLXXXIV. The Dogs and the Hides
CLXXXV. The Dove and the Ant
CLXXXVI. The Old Lion
CLXXXVII. The Wolf and the Shepherds
CLXXXVIII. The Ass in the Lion's Skin
CLXXXIX. The Swallow in Chancery
CXC. The Raven and the Swan
CXCI. The Wild Boar and the Fox
CXCII. The Stag at the Pool
CXCIII. The Wolf in Sheep's Clothing
CXCIV. The Boasting Traveler
CXCV. The Man and his Two Wives
CXCVI. The Shepherd and the Sea
CXCVII. The Miser
CXCVIII. Mercury and the Sculptor
CXCIX. The Miller, His Son, and Their Ass
CC. The Wolf and the Horse
CCI. The Astronomer
CCII. The Hunter and the Woodcutter
CCIII. The Fox and the Crow

Afterword
Selected Bibliography
Index

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

"Jonathan Kent's reading revives the original oral tradition, and his voices for the animal characters make the little stories entertaining as well as enlightening." —-AudioFile

Customer Reviews

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Aesop's Fables(Classic illustrations) 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 494 reviews.
IkaIka More than 1 year ago
What can one say about all the wonderful tells of this book. You can entertain yourself for days!
Ymn Nasser More than 1 year ago
Google 'gutenburg free ebooks'. This book of stories is great and no longer under copyright law so it's ( along with a lot if other classics) actually free to download instantly thru your nook or pc to nook via the mentioned website.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love him he is a wonderful writer my youngest child in middle school is learning about him so i wanted to read her/him his fables yaayaaaayayyyayay they are so happy with the fable they love them i would recomend them to middle schoolers to learn!!!!!!!!!! :) :)
Guest More than 1 year ago
Every story in this book has a moral. 'Spare the Rod and Spoil the Child.' It means instead of hitting the child let them get in trouble and realize what they did wrong. Also i thought it would have a good impact on children and parents.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The is an excellent book!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
My childhood memories are few and far betwen but I specifically remember Aesop's Fables. A wonderful tale ever child should have a chance to read at an early age.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
For kids undr ten. Good to read in bed or snuggled up with a blanket on a rainy day! Your reader Abby
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It teaches us some very good morals,"honesty is very important", is just one of the many morals Aesop wrote. I LOVE THE BOOK!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I think it had a lot of good details & I like it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It's ok but they said a bad word for the donkeys in one of te stories not my 100% favorites but ...... well ..... it's ok
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Asops fables are very sweet because my favorite is the lion and the mouse
Anonymous 7 months ago
I love to read this book over and over again there are so many good stories like The Farmer and te Stork and The Milk Maid and her Pail
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
So awesome!!!!!! I love it!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ;)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hello I am new to this whole talking on nook thing. If anyone can help you can reach me at Kitty.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I hate this
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Where's the character list? I can't find it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Its so fun to read. I love the literature that was given.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Please freind me.And i love asop fables so fun to read
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Just got to the resort in wyoming! BEST XMAS EVER!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Where am I?" Max quitly wispered to her self. She stood up her long black hair in a tangled mess. As she looked aroud she saw Jamie. Why is he here? she thought. Max is not mad that he is here just confused. Why the new kid? She kept thinking. As he walks toward her ahe feels like she gonna pass out. She jolts awaking sitting up and feeling dizzy. What going she thinks and lays back down and falls asleep. Hi my name is Hope please if you read this and want more leave a review tittled with my named
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Reviews are here so people can see how the book. If you do not have anything to say about the book do not put a review
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
You there
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
He walked around.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Nice to see your face for once" he said
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Tehya~ im soory guys idk when im getting my nook bk.... btw... has anyone seen Pi or Justin... Justins ben gone since the 16th and Pi.... his names just.... gone... im worried about him... this is our only way to talk and i cant lose him... if anyone sees him please post at 'pissed' res one. its the book tht says pissed hag tales... please help....