Anvil of Stars (Forge of God Series #2)

Anvil of Stars (Forge of God Series #2)

by Greg Bear

Paperback(First Edition)

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Overview

Greg Bear's The Forge of God described the destruction of Earth itself by self-replicating robots, Von Neumann machines designed to use the planet's mass to create more robotic creatures and spread throughout the Galaxy. In Anvil of Stars, only a few humans have survived, aided by a mysterious alien race known only as "The Benefactors", who arrived at Earth too late.

Now the small group of human survivors is determined to track down the criminal race who launched the planet killers. Humanity is given a starship by The Benefactors, and driven only by revenge they set out to find the unknown beings who are responsible for the destruction of Earth, and many other worlds.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780765318145
Publisher: Tom Doherty Associates
Publication date: 03/04/2008
Series: Forge of God Series , #2
Edition description: First Edition
Pages: 448
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.99(d)

About the Author

Greg Bear is the author of more than thirty books of science fiction and fantasy, including Blood Music, The Forge of God, Darwin's Radio, and Quantico. Awarded two Hugos and five Nebulas for his fiction, one of two authors to win a Nebula in every category, Bear has been called the "Best working writer of hard science fiction" by "The Ultimate Encyclopedia of Science Fiction." He lives in the Seattle, WA area.

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Anvil of Stars 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 26 reviews.
onalake1 More than 1 year ago
I thought this sequel was very different from the original but in a good way. First book, Forge of God, was great but it takes place all on earth. Anvil of Stars takes place all on a ship in outer space with the kids who survived from the first book. At first it felt a bit like Ender's Game but it took on a life of it's own. Religion & revenge collide in the sequel. The pace was quite good and the ideas and ideals discussed were good but would have liked a bit more depth.
AJswimmer More than 1 year ago
Anvil of Stars, like Forge of God, offers an interesting insight into the human mind. The interactions of the characters after being cooped up in a space ship for years are well written and ring very true with what one might expect from such people in real life. The deeper and more important idea of revenge and whether it is a valid end regardless of the means you use to get there well treated, though it rings slightly hollow at the end with what seemed like a late publisher addition of a happy ending. That said, I preferred the first book and the take it took on humanity's reaction to an imminent global crisis. I would not hesitate, however, to recommend it for a fun read. Especially if you have read the first one. There was also a coding error in my Nook edition of this book where a few pages before the end of the 3rd section, the section restarted instead of ending and moving on to the next section.
funkendub on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Earth is dead, reduced to rocks and dust by a horde of marauding alien machine intelligences. A few thousand Earthlings have been saved by the Benefactors, themselves machine intelligences who have helped the survivors re-establish themselves on Mars. That story was told in Greg Bear¿s 1987 novel, The Forge of God.Now, in Anvil of Stars, the sequel to Forge, three hundred years have gone by, and the Benefactors have outfitted 80 or so Earth children with a Ship of the Law capable of exacting revenge on the killer machines that destroyed their home. Three hundred years have gone by in a literal blink of the eye, as the children have been asleep, traveling at 99 percent of the speed of light. They begin training for what lies ahead of them: the willful destruction of an entire solar system full of intelligent beings.This tightly plotted novel stands alone as a highly imaginative consideration of genocide. Enacting the Law of revenge is one thing; making sure you¿ve got the true perpetrators of Earth¿s destruction is another. Hundreds of years have passed¿what if the killer machines and their makers have changed their ways?The pleasures of this novel lie in Bear¿s ability to weave together the action and pacing of a thriller with the philosophical puzzle of blame and the sociological complexities of a group of kids tutored by aliens so technologically advanced humans are simple animals by comparison. Simple animals, perhaps, but Bear always celebrates the ability of the human mind to learn and adapt. The alien Benefactors teach the human children a method of mathematical analysis called momerath, a kinetic visualization technique that enables them to calculate orbits in complex systems and develop weapons of unimaginable power.A master of science fiction on an epic scale, Anvil of Stars has Bear operating on full imaginative power. Add to that the cultural relevance of the novel¿s central themes ¿ justice and genocide ¿ and you¿ve got a thriller as exciting and worthwhile today as when it was originally published in 1992.Originally published on Curled Up with a Good Book.
chrisod on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Anvil of Stars is the sequel to The Forge of God. In Anvil, a group of 80 teenagers have been plucked from the survivors of earth¿s destruction and tasked with hunting down and eliminating the creators of the robots that destroyed earth. They are guided by robot overlords who train them for the task but otherwise don¿t interfere. The book starts sort of slowly, with the first third or so being a ¿Lord of the Flies¿ like examination of how these kids would self organize and structure their society. The 2nd half of the book is much better IMO, and when they meet up with another sentient alien species also hunting the killers it becomes difficult to stop reading, as evidenced my finishing the book at 2 AM last night. The 2nd half also becomes a bit of a morality play as the kids wrestle with the decision to potentially kill trillions of innocent life forms that are shielding the killers. You don¿t have to read Forge first to enjoy this book, but I recommend it. Forge was so great that no sequel would stand up, and that is sort of the case here. Anvil is fine book and if you are a sci-fi fan you¿ll enjoy it. Just be warned that you may have to force yourself to slug through the first third or so, but the payoff is worth it.
Karlstar on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Just before the Earth was destroyed by a black hole sent by aliens, a ship full of human children was sent out to get revenge. Once out in the universe, they face many challenges, not the least of which is how, and why to continue the mission. Good stuff!
dreamless on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Vengeance for berserker robots. It's awesome on questions of big-scale intercivilizational war: berserker robots vs. hiding out, and all the rest. The people stuff, not so much.
cmoore on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
2/5. This sequel to Forge of God doesn't come close to matching the quality of the first. Uninspiring and a drag - without the Earth to mourn, all you've got is human infighting and power politics, at which point, you're in Ender's Game territory, only harder edged.
macha on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Greg Bear and i have a teensy bit of a troubled relationship. i read him for ideas, so it's unfair to fault him on the entertainment end, but sometimes i just do. his ideas aren't always translated into engaging characters and/or story. but this one held my interest all the way through. bit stiff, but worth the read. a study of vengeance as a measure of humanity. i liked my ending better, though.*g*
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was captivated from the start. Lots of action and a satisfying ending. Enjoyed it a lot.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very imaginiative.
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