Ashes, Ashes

Ashes, Ashes

by Jo Treggiari

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780545255646
Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date: 01/01/2013
Pages: 352
Sales rank: 560,698
Product dimensions: 5.20(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range: 12 Years

About the Author


Jo Treggiari was born in London, England, and raised in Ottawa, Ontario. Her first attempts at writing were when she started revising classic fairy tales at age eight. Jo spent several years in San Francisco, where she trained as a boxer, wrote for punk magazines, and owned her own record label. She now lives in Nova Scotia, Canada, and still enjoys shadowboxing when she isn't working at her local bookstore.

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Ashes, Ashes 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 122 reviews.
Book_WhispererJO More than 1 year ago
Ashes, Ashes is a terrifyingly realistic view at the world's end. BookWhisperer is not known for books such as this one; after several struggles this is usually a book that I would have avoided. Much to my surprise Ashes, Ashes will be the first of this type of book on my favorites list. Lucy is the strong and courageous sixteen year old that will follow throughout this novel. Being the soul survivor of her entire family she has set out to living in the wild alone. It is remarkable to follow this young girl as she struggles to survive in a world where the population has been wiped out down to a mere third. After the natural disasters that reeked havoc over the entire world the survivors then battled the plague that swarmed the remaining population. This was a terrifying look at the apocalypse that would leave every reader pondering their future. The romantic twist for Lucy and Aidan was a sweet hopeful addition that give readers moments of happiness to grasp through this story. This simple addition gives readers future hope the story that they will follow, and possibility for a dramatic happily ever after. As far as I can tell this is only this authors second novel, but I am utterly impressed by her ability to present such an intriguing story. If this is a glimpse at the works possible from this author I look for many more great books.
Icecream18 More than 1 year ago
This book is a very intriguing read. The main character, Lucy, has survived a virus that killed off 99% of the Earth's population-including her family. Lucy is a very industrious girl; she lives on her own and survives by herself. The action begins right away in this novel; the reader will not be bored. Lucy meets Aidan after he helps her evade a pack of wild dogs. She joins him and the other survivors; the reader will enjoy meeting the various different personalities. Of course, there is always the danger aspect. Lucy is not entirely safe; there are "sweepers" on the loose. Sweepers work for the government to round up survivors like Lucy to study them and attempt to discover why they survived the virus. It is not long before Lucy catches on that she is an integral part in discovering a cure. The book is not written entirely in the present tense, there are flashbacks to the past. The reader will experience, alongside Lucy, how life was before the virus. Lucy and her family were happy and "normal." There are a few different qualities to this story: action, romance, mystery, drama, etc... Lucy is a strong female character; readers will appreciate this since strong females leads are not common in survivalist novels. Lucy and Aidan have a bit of a budding romance; however, this is not the forefront of the story. The author allows the reader into this post-apocalyptic world; the environment is tangible to the reader. There is a lack of dialogue in the beginning of the novel as Lucy is alone for the first portion, but there is dialogue throughout the rest of the novel. The story is very fast-paced and new developments occur to hold the reader's interest. This novel is highly recommended for young adult/teen readers, specifically those who enjoy science fiction and action-filled novels.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ashes, Ashes is a novel about a girl trying to survive a post apocalyptic world. As she attempts to survive in a futureistic and devestated Central Park in the flooded, collapsed wasteland of what once was the mega-city of New York, she meets someone like her, just trying to survive, Aiden. I thought it was a great book although i did think the villain was a complete psycopath...even if she was trying to find a cure for the disese.highly recommended!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I LOVE THIS BOOK! Its a great book! My teacher read this as a read aloud and when she would stop reading we would all be like " keep on reading! " you should get this book. If you are interested in the world ending and what the world may by like if it ended, get it!!!This book is not just about the world ending its also about romance and Girls out thre who are reading this review this book, it also involves a bit drama between a girl named Lucy and a girl named Del. Get this book its really worth buying it. You'll instantly fall in love with the book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was "o.k.". It was not what I was looking for after reading the Hunger Games Trilogy, Divergent & Insurgent, & Legend (great). I rarely want to leave a book unfinished; however, this was one of those books. I'm sure the Author has better to offer the reader. Read Legend or Divergent if you're looking for some "end of the world" action.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
good plot, great story but the book came to an abrupt end and it took away from the awesome adventure I was on as an egar reader. GREAT READ though.
KatrinaDuvall1992 on LibraryThing 1 days ago
This book was okay. I was barely able to finish it but it was still interesting. And different.
squirrelsohno on LibraryThing 1 days ago
ASHES, ASHES is the story of Lucy, the last survivor from her family who has trekked from New Jersey to the remains of New York City in an attempt to survive. She¿s survived floods, earthquakes, tsunamis, and a plague to make it this far, but she¿s alone. Lots of bad stuff happens to her, and we are introduced to this as we hear about her back story ¿ she was a loner, forgotten by those around her, and lucky. In New York, living on the edges of the Hudson Sea, she is fending for herself as best as she can. Note, I had some problems with the geography of this book, but since I lived in New York City for two years, this could be why. Unless these earthquakes drastically changed the landscape of New York by thousands of feet¿ I¿ll get to that. And the smallpox vaccine loses its effectiveness after 10 years, so another plot hole. Okay, there were a lot of plot holes.Lucy has been out on her own for a long time when suddenly, after a year of surviving well on her own, she is discovered by the designated love interest Aidan. I have to admit, he was rather bland in the characterization department, but he draws her back with him towards an encampment halfway into the novel. This is when the action really begins after a slow, somewhat plodding start. It was, though, promising and left me wanting to read more. By the time we meet the other characters, though, the story devolves into obvious turns that can be seen a mile away, and these new characters turn into either shells, forgotten tertiary scenery, or stereotypical foils.But I give this book one thing. It got me involved in a fun conversation with a friend about guessing where the book was going next, and more often than not, I was either right or came up with something that really would have been more fun.By the end, I found myself rooting for Lucy to buck convention and go for the much more interesting secondary male character over Aidan. Del, the designated foil of the story, was trite and possessive, but I felt like she was angry at Lucy for trying to claim her boyfriend after a few days of showing up in the camp. I quickly found Lucy to be bratty and hard to connect with because of her actions and her instant attraction to a guy she met while escaping dogs in a tree. And he might have been stalking her. Maybe. There were cat fights over a boy within moments of Lucy¿s arrival at the survivor camp, which was stupidly placed two miles away in plain sight from the big bad¿s lair. They could have easily left the city, but instead they just set up shop right where the much better equipped devilish scientists could pick them off whenever they needed a test subject.After ill-conceived escapades, I never felt any connection to the main characters. In fact, I was still hung up on Henry, who we were supposed to believe was just there to flirt until the end of time. He had personality! The author also has a tendency to end the chapter on a cliffhanger, and then completely forget that the cliffhanger happened. I thought this was a bit¿odd. By the time we reach the end, our special snowflake Lucy has the chance to save the world¿and doesn¿t want to. Really? Oh, that might be because the villain is being unreasonable for no conceivable reason. She¿s bad for the sake of needing a bad guy.The ending is wrapped up with neat, convenient little bows, giving a good conclusion but not the one it could have been.VERDICT: A slow, meticulous buildup leads to catty drama and a dull climax, but if post-apocalyptic girl drama is your thing, don¿t miss it. Also suggested for lovers of the words hummock and hillock, they¿re used about every other page.
Mariah7 on LibraryThing 1 days ago
The only thing I didnt like about this book was the cover. In the book Lucy hasnt showered for weeks and stinks like crazy, but on the cover she has perfect hair and clean white tank top. Come on!Okkkk...besides that I loved it. Lucy was tough and handle her self. She had to get move on after her family died and she survived. I loved Aiden and all the other characters. Sammy and Henry were great characters and added a little humor to the book.Overall a great story. :)
ilikethesebooks on LibraryThing 1 days ago
I love dystopians, I love them! Ashes, Ashes by Jo Treggiari is a good read for any dystopian lover. However, I did have a few mixed feelings. Ashes, Ashes follows Lucy, the only survivor out of her family after a plague wiped out 99.9% of the population. She is just trying to survive, but she sees the water levels rising and what's left the animal population dwindling down. She doesn't have a comfortable life, but she has a place to live, and she's figured out what it is she needs to do every day. But how much longer can she go on like this? Just as she is starting to grasp reality, she meets Aidan, the first person she's met in a long time. Everything she knows seems to change, romances emerge, lives are lost and secrets are revealed. This book was an adventure, and I enjoyed that aspect. I loved the world that Jo Treggiari created. Well, loved may not be the word... It was a terrifying, solemn, interesting and surprisingly hopeful. I loved how there was a group of people who didn't give up. They are still fighting to survive, even though the demise of the human race seems evident. It is groups of characters like those that are optimistic towards humanity that are somewhat comforting. That is one of my favorite things about dystopians. When the end of the world is in full swing, people still hold on. The book as a whole was nice. I liked the characters and the plot, but I just felt like something was missing. I felt like either this was the first book in a series, or half of the book was missing. It just needed a little more, I would have loved this book if there was. Don't get me wrong, I did enjoy it (hence the "liked it"/4 star rating), I just wish there was more. So, long story short, I would recommend Ashes, Ashes, especially if you like dystopians.
justablondemoment on LibraryThing 1 days ago
I really got into this book. It is quite a high when a book can absorb you to a point that you can hardly bear putting it down and this book did that. As it was a YA book it was a really fast read but not so "young-ish" that as an adult I couldn't enjoy it. Thumbs up on this one. Hope this one continues on as a series
pollywannabook on LibraryThing 1 days ago
Review courtesy of All Things Urban FantasyAre you ready for another dystopian novel? You should be. ASHES, ASHES by Jo Treggiari destroys the world and throws a sixteen year old girl into the ruins. My favorite thing about ASHES, ASHES was the evolution of the character of Lucy. In most dystopian novels, the characters have grown up in their dystopian world. They don¿t know anything else. Not Lucy. She grew up much like teenagers today. She went to high school, worried about boys and bullies, had a normal family. Until a series of environmental catastrophes brought civilization to it¿s knees. And before humanity could even begin to rebuild, a plague swept across the planet instantly killing 99% of the population.Lucy didn¿t grow up knowing how to survive in an urban wilderness. But she learned. After everyone she knew succumbed to the plague, she left behind a corpse filled neighborhood for an unrecognizable New York City, and she hung on to life by sheer stubbornness. When ASHES, ASHES begins, Lucy has survived for a year on her own with little more than her father¿s pocket knife and an old survivor¿s guide from a ransacked bookstore. She becomes like an urban Robinson Crusoe. Alone with only her thoughts and memories until she meets Aidan. Those who survived the plague have banded together into one of three groups. The Scavengers, like Aiden, take what they can and make what they can¿t to survive. The S¿ans are the pitiful leper-like people who somehow survived the plague that ruined their bodies. And then there are the Sweepers. They patrol the streets abducting survivors and raiding Scavenger camps and stealing a few people each time for reasons unknown. Lucy has chosen to live on her own, but when the Sweepers seem to target her specifically, she has no choice but to join with Aidan.The first in a planned series, ASHES, ASHES deserves a spot on your dystopian shelf. It¿s not as grand as some of it¿s predecessors, but the portrayal of this ruined New York is vivid and haunting, and Lucy¿s story of survival is both pitiful and inspiring. I enjoyed every page.Sexual Content:Kissing
mycutebookshelf on LibraryThing 1 days ago
This was a very nice dystopian young adult book. It had a similar feel to Enclave, but it was mostly because of the setting. Other than that, it was completely different. The mood of the book was sort of depressing, but the ending was a great one. It wasn't as action packed as other dystopian books, but I liked it just like that. I thought it was much more realistic than other books out there. I definitely thought this could happen someday. I absolutely recommend this book, especially to fans of Enclave and other post-apocalyptic books.
missyreadsreviews on LibraryThing 1 days ago
I'd have to say that I thought this one would start out a little lackluster. The main character is alone, so there's a severe lack of dialogue and social interaction. However, there is a vivid description of the world - so vivid that it could give me nightmares. I'm kind of a girl when it comes to being alone, and the insight of this world creeped me out a little... in a good way, though.Soon enough though, it accelerates when Lucy meets up with Aidan and his crew. Not only do we get to know him and the other survivors better, but we get a better sense of who Lucy is as well. She's a strong, determined character with many likeable traits including her fierce loyalty and her ability to stay a little mysterious, not completely transparent once a boy comes into the picture. Aidan is pretty sweet, as well as a tough survivor. Their relationship was a nice, steady one though I always kept my eyes out for Henry - who was a witty little character.There were a few unanswered questions that I never got out of the story, as well as some parts I could have done without. This was kind of a shaky 4 for me, but it was better than a 3... so maybe I should say 3.5? Whichever the case, it's a pretty decent read that I think a nice majority of YA readers would like.
callmecayce on LibraryThing 1 days ago
A typical, albeit somewhat darker, dystopian novel. It was good, though not great, but I enjoyed reading it, even if it was at times a bit unnerving. It reminded me in a way of Life As We Knew It, and like that book, our main character was an extremely strong young woman named Lucy. I liked that she was tough the whole time we met her, even after the budding romance that develops throughout the course of the novel. I'm pleased that Treggiari's novel doesn't seem to be part of a series, as I'm getting tired of them. I think there could be more books, but I was left satisfied and definitely not in need of any more. I'd recommend this to fans of dysopian novels, especially kids who like survival type books. I really liked the bleak setting of the novel, but that's what makes dypstopia such a great genre to begin with.
nbmars on LibraryThing 1 days ago
Sixteen-year-old Lucy Holloway lives in a transformed landscape that used to be New York City before environmental upheaval. It was destroyed by melting polar caps; rising sea levels; and the constant occurrence of hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes and tsunamis. But it wasn¿t only this that reduced the population: a resurgence of smallpox in a more virulent form wiped out all but one percent of the population left from the ecological chaos. Lucy lives on her own in primitive circumstances, surviving as best she can, until one day, trying to escape a pack of feral dogs, she encounters someone else. Well yes, of course it happens to be a cute young guy about her age named Aidan.When Lucy¿s campsite is destroyed by a tsunami, she joins Aidan¿s settlement, and immediately the heretofore happy settlement is the subject of repeated attacks by The Sweepers, an armed force supposedly looking for plague-infected individuals to protect the rest of the population. But it turns out they are really looking for Lucy.Discussion: The book starts out as a slow, post-apocalyptic survival book, reminding me of the Tom Hanks movie, ¿Cast Away.¿ It takes a turn to the dystopic when Lucy joins Aidan and runs into Nefarious People with Power and Weapons. And then it adds a romance, complete with obligatory triangle (although in truth, not much of either). The genre jumping makes not only the book a bit inconsistent, but the characters as well, who seem to change personalities in each segment. In the beginning Lucy is a savvy survivalist and loner; then she morphs into a lovesick lonely teen; and then she becomes a totally naïve incompetent. Aidan takes a couple of complete u-turns as well. As for the precipitating factors leading to the devastated landscape of the book, it felt like as many as possible were thrown in to ensure the preconditions of population reduction. None, however, were fully developed. A tantalizing side story was introduced regarding the plague survivors, but it was left to simmer along with the other ingredients in this plot stew.Evaluation: A hodgepodge of plot lines and styles and character personality changes militate against too much emotional investment in this book. It isn¿t the worst of its several genres, but not the best, by far.
Icecream18 on LibraryThing 1 days ago
This book is a very intriguing read. The main character, Lucy, has survived a virus that killed off 99% of the Earth's population-including her family. Lucy is a very industrious girl; she lives on her own and survives by herself. The action begins right away in this novel; the reader will not be bored. Lucy meets Aidan after he helps her evade a pack of wild dogs. She joins him and the other survivors; the reader will enjoy meeting the various different personalities. Of course, there is always the danger aspect. Lucy is not entirely safe; there are "sweepers" on the loose. Sweepers work for the government to round up survivors like Lucy to study them and attempt to discover why they survived the virus. It is not long before Lucy catches on that she is an integral part in discovering a cure. The book is not written entirely in the present tense, there are flashbacks to the past. The reader will experience, alongside Lucy, how life was before the virus. Lucy and her family were happy and "normal." There are a few different qualities to this story: action, romance, mystery, drama, etc... Lucy is a strong female character; readers will appreciate this since strong females leads are not common in survivalist novels. Lucy and Aidan have a bit of a budding romance; however, this is not the forefront of the story. The author allows the reader into this post-apocalyptic world; the environment is tangible to the reader. There is a lack of dialogue in the beginning of the novel as Lucy is alone for the first portion, but there is dialogue throughout the rest of the novel. The story is very fast-paced and new developments occur to hold the reader's interest. This novel is highly recommended for young adult/teen readers, specifically those who enjoy science fiction and action-filled novels.
Candacemom2two on LibraryThing 1 days ago
This book was one of those books that really gets you thinking and planning for a disaster. But that's definitely not a bad thing. As a matter of fact this book was really fantastic and it felt very real to me. One thing that made it more real feeling is the main character, Lucy, has lived a normal life. She talked about living in the suburbs and how the natural disasters first hit and then later the plague goes through. In the end only 1% of the population has survived. We watch Lucy from when she's afraid and pretty close minded about things and lives all alone to avoid conflict, and because she doesn't trust people. Once she's forced to move on and lives with people again she really finds her true self within herself and we watch her grow into a wonderful person.I really liked all the characters in this book, especially Aiden. There's something about him that you can't help but love. There are other characters that play their roles perfectly, as people we love and hate or love to hate. I felt like the things people went through, and the way they reacted to things felt realistic.The romance is light, it's there but doesn't get a real chance to get real far. However we feel the attraction between the two and the tension is fantastic.This was a clean read but I think that it's not a book that everyone would have an easy time with. Keep in mind what it's about and I think that should give you a good enough idea whether the subject matter is for you. I loved this book but I found myself needing to take some breaks from it. Even though I did take breaks and read something else I still cruised through the book in no time at all.The book ended with a conclusion, but there's definitely room for a sequel and I really hope that the author is writing one. I think Lucy's journey has only just begun and I would like to see her travel a bit and see how the rest of the country is faring. So my fingers are crossed!
mountie9 on LibraryThing 1 days ago
The Good Stuff * characters are pretty realistic for a dystopian book * Good character development with Lucy. At the beginning I really didn't like her, but she developed and grew and by the end I was cheering for her * intriguing secondary characters that I would have liked to have more of * Love the cover, would have picked it up for that alone * Intriguing and creepy beginning hooks you into the story * Fantastic job at setting the mood and the landscape. At times when I stopped reading I became disjointed because I felt so much a part of their world * The landscape is almost another character in the story, its almost haunting * Story was nice and fast paced and kept you intrigued with what was going to happen next * Some nice dry humourThe Not so Good Stuff * Needed some more back-story to characters - might have worked better as a trilogy or at least a book 1 and 2 - but hey I'm just being selfish and wanting more * OK this one is being really picky but major error when she first meets Aidan - all of a sudden she knows his name and he never mentions it (went back and reread the pages to make sure I hadn't skipped something)Favorite Quotes/Passages"Instead of globe-eyed aliens or a gigantic meteorite headed straight for Earth, it was the resurgence of a killer disease that had reduced the global population to less than 1 percent of what it had been within three short months. Eating healthy, exercising, living in a big house, driving a fancy car - none of that mattered at all. The pox took almost everybody, and it seemed that people between the ages of thirty and sixty died faster and harder than anyone.""You're a lot like Del," he said. "Hot-tempered. What's the nice word? Impetuous." His mouth twisted into a wry grin."She estimated that she was around Second Avenue and 92nd Street, although acres of road and earth had been shifted in the big quake,the landscape completely reconfigured. Sometimes she thought it looked as if a toddler had built a city out of blocks and then knocked them all down in a rage."What I Learned * Must get me a Survival handbook - or I am a goner if this particular scenario came true * Have no urge to ever eat TurtleWho should/shouldn't read * Just sayin, probably not a good one to read after 5 days of continuous rain, it will freak you out (trust me, it was creepy reading it when the weather was so crappy here) * This one is pretty intense, not for the sensitive reader * Obviously fans of Dystopian fiction will enjoy4 Dewey'sI received this from Scholastic in exchange for an honest review
MargK on LibraryThing 1 days ago
Like with most hot summer flings, my borderline obsessive, punch-drunk infatuation with YA dystopian fiction has finally blown its spark plug and officially fizzled out. Looking back on it all, there were definitely some good times (namely the awesomely gory zombie killing and the adrenaline-pumped running for your mother-loving life), but there were also A LOT of bad times.Therefore, I was really hoping that my last farewell rendezvous would turn out to be a fun one and that YA dystopian fiction and I could part ways on a happy note. Unfortunately, as fate would have it, our tumultuous relationship ended in even more disappointment...and a bit of mild, bilingual cussing.Bloody hell, I hate to say it ('cos I'm kinda starting to sound like a broken record), but I just didn't enjoy this book. Allow me to elaborate.Ashes Ashes, started off on the right foot. Immediately, the reader is introduced to Lucy, a klutzy average teen girl trying her best to survive on her own in the wilderness after the world as we know it has been brought to ruin by a series of wide-sweeping environmental disasters and a deadly, highly contagious plague.Being a tutorial and how to guide junkie myself, I was actually able to get behind the idea that Lucy was capable of learning valuable skills & techniques from a survival guide she picked up along her travels. In my mind, I imagined the guide to be written by the very resourceful & ballsy Bear Grylls. In fact, I got excited because I was hoping that Lucy's story would take the Man vs Wild route and focus on her post-apocalyptic adventures facing off against a seriously pissed off Mother Nature. Therefore, the first handful of chapters kept me quite interested and had me looking forward to seeing Lucy tackle various challenges thrown her way.Sadly, my excitement wore off rather quickly, and the moment Lucy joined up with a camp of other survivors, the story pretty much went downhill and eventually crashed & burned for me.In all honesty, the camp might as well have been named West Beverly High 'cos the majority of what happened there involved silly teenage melodrama & angst a la 90210. There was a whole lot of I-hate-him-but-I-like-him nonsense, cheesy flirting, repressed feelings, childish rivalry, icy glares, and non-communication leading to unnecessary misunderstandings.Seriously, there was a whole big chunk of the book in which nothing of real significance or plot development happened...it felt like pointless filler. The interactions between the characters weren't even meaningful and neither was much of the dialogue. It all felt very superficial. And I never felt as though I really got to know any of the characters. They all seemed like flat paper cutouts of common cliches. There was the insecure plain Jane heroine, the quiet broody love interest, the goofy flirt, the beautiful mean girl, the wise matriarchal granny, and the mad scientist/evil villain. And that's all they were; they had no depth or complexity to them. Consequently, I couldn't bring myself to be interested in or care about anyone one of them.Finally, there was also quite a bit of stuff that didn't make logical sense or completely add up in my mind. In particular, the explanations behind the plague, its spread, and immunity didn't jive well with what I've personally studied & learned about viral diseases. And I didn't understand why the camp just waited around (out in the open) to get picked off one by one, and why the Sweepers had such laughably incompetent security.So, yeah, I truly wanted to like Ashes Ashes, and I saw potential in the story, but there wasn't enough substance to the characters and the plot was too simplistic, linear, and predictable for me to get engrossed in the adventure and enjoy the book.
krau0098 on LibraryThing 1 days ago
I bought an ARC of this book at The Strand bookstore when I was in NYC for the Book Expo this year. I had been trying to decide if I wanted to read this book or not. I love post-apocalyptic survival stories so I decided to pick it up. It was okay, not nearly as good as some of the other options out there, but an okay story.Lucy has been surviving on her own for nearly a year in Central Park in NYC. After small-pox epidemics annihilated the population, the climate changed alternating droughts and horrible flooding. When dogs and floods drive her out of her makeshift home she ends up with a group of survivors living commune stle. The mysterious Sweepers have started picking off members of the commune one by one an Lucy is frustrated with the groups acceptance of the situation. Lucy is intrigued by a boy named Aidan and is urging him to rally the group to fight, but there are things about herself Lucy doesn't know that complicates the issue.This book starts out very slow. Around page 80 or so I almost stopped reading it, I didn't like Lucy as a character and Treggiari's writing style was just a bit too mechanical for me. She does an excellent job describing the gritty side of survival; blisters and uncleanliness, gutting animals etc but somehow it just wasn't that interesting..the writing style was a bit to disconnected or something. Once Lucy meets up with the large survivor camp things pick up and get a bit more interesting.The "romance" between Lucy and Aidan is pretty thin, which is odd since the book touts itself as a romantic read. There are lingering glances and a kiss or two, not much meaningful conversion. The romance is definitely pushed to the back of the story, the story focuses more on survival and figuring out the mystery behind the Sweepers and their purpose.The plot was a little schizophrenic. In the beginning is was a book about survival, the mid portion focuses more on commune living, and the end is suddenly about genetic engineering and the science of vaccinations. I think somewhere in here there could have been a really great story, but it got confused because Treggiari couldn't figure out what to focus on. I was a bit thrown with the whole evil scientist thing at the end of the book. I mean come on, that was so predictable and so cliche, I expected something more profound or deeper to happen. I was also a bit disappointed that we don't get any insight into the rest of the world. The book is very focused on just Lucy's little world.The characters were okay. Lucy, Aiden, and Del are fairly engaging, if not really likable. As readers we never get enough incite into them to really make us care a whole lot about what happens to them. The book ends well enough and resolves the major plot point while leaving the characters overall survival problems unsolved.Overall this was an okay book. It starts out slow but the second half is engaging enough if a bit cliche and unfocused. The characters are okay, the plot is a bit unfocused, and the book didn't have as big of an impact on me as I hoped for. The problem is there are so many great post-apocalyptic young adult books out there. I would personally recommend skipping this book and checking out the following books: Life as We Knew It by Susan Beth Pfeffer, Blood Red Road by Moira Young, The Reapers are the Angels by Alden Bell, Feed by Mira Grant (more of an adult read), Divergent by Veronica Roth (more of a dystopia), and Wither by Lauren DeStefano (more of a dystopia). After you read all of those if you crave more post-apocalyptic survival YA reads then maybe check this out.
Anonymous 9 months ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Is this a good story for me to b reading because i dont went to read it if it has bad words in it and anyot so good things in it so can someone please answer me about this book because i went to read it and will i understand what i am reading about and is there any pictures that i should not see in this story because i dont went to see any bad pictures in this story tat are not good for me eyes to see people today write books so the other people can read it an understand what they are reading about and people put bad things in books so that other people can read the book for themselfs and if there is any bad wotds in this book tjen im not reading this book then so someone tell me now of there is some bad words and anything worng with this book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved this book. It had everything. Every good
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Trust me if you like a dystopiaan kind of book, kinda like, The hunger gamed, you'll love thid book. I can't wait to read Pocket Full Of Posies! :)