Baseball in the Garden of Eden: The Secret History of the Early Game

Baseball in the Garden of Eden: The Secret History of the Early Game

by John Thorn
3.5 20

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Baseball in the Garden of Eden 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 20 reviews.
OldDeadGuys More than 1 year ago
I know, what type of title for a review is that, well it's the best I could do with what I read. I heard about this book on NPR and heard the author talk and was instantly interested. Unfortunately I was truly let down once I dug into the book. It is obvious that Mr. Thorn is an expert on the history of baseball, that he has more than done his homework, and that his hypothesis is quite well supported and even admired. However, his writing organization, voice and structure truly threw me. If you love baseball and want a look at the early game you will get through this book as I did, but if you are looking for a good story and narrative say like, D. Kearn Goodwin's Lincoln Team of Rivals, you will be let down as I was.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed this book. It went a little sideways in terms of spaldings cult dealings. Overall it was good.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Don't read it. If this book had any physical taste to it it would have to be cardboard. The author here seems to put a lackluster vibe into telling us what could have been a very interseting true to life account. Sorry, Thorn. You've failed miserably. Sincerely, Christian Parker
thechudster More than 1 year ago
Knowing John Thorn's work mostly through the Ken Burns "Baseball" documentaries, and being aware that he is the official MLB historian now, I knew this book would be well-written. It was very interesting to discover others around the game in its formative years that give a person looking back more of an impression of how a game would've evolved, and couldn't just spring from the mind of one individual. Thorn does a good job of going into details about the Mills Commission, how it worked, as well as its intentions and motivations. I gained an appreciation of what they were trying to do (although I was non-plussed by the cult backstory surrounding A.G. Spalding). I believe the intentions of Mills in particular was mostly noble, but see how it could easily get off the track with primitive methods of research (namely that it was largely word-of-mouth). As always with these types of books, I came away wanting even more detail, especially about how certain types of on-field plays came into being, etc. Overall, other than the cult business Spalding was involved in (necessary to be aware of, but too much detail paid to it, in my opinion), this was just what I expected. Very much recommended for anyone who wants to understand the origins of the game we see in the 21st century.
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Superfan99 More than 1 year ago
history of baseball!