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Capitalist Realism: Is there no alternative?
     

Capitalist Realism: Is there no alternative?

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by Mark Fisher
 

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After 1989, capitalism has successfully presented itself as the only realistic political-economic system - a situation that the bank crisis of 2008, far from ending, actually compounded. The book analyses the development and principal features of this capitalist realism as a lived ideological framework. Using examples from politics, films, fiction, work and education,

Overview

After 1989, capitalism has successfully presented itself as the only realistic political-economic system - a situation that the bank crisis of 2008, far from ending, actually compounded. The book analyses the development and principal features of this capitalist realism as a lived ideological framework. Using examples from politics, films, fiction, work and education, it argues that capitalist realism colours all areas of contemporary experience. But it will also show that, because of a number of inconsistencies and glitches internal to the capitalist reality program capitalism in fact is anything but realistic.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781780997346
Publisher:
Hunt, John Publishing
Publication date:
11/27/2009
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
92
Sales rank:
547,256
File size:
372 KB

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Meet the Author

highly respected both as a music writer and a theorist. He writes regularly for The Wire, frieze, New Statesman, and Sight & Sound

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Capitalist Realism: Is there no alternative? 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous 26 days ago
Everybody who thinks knows we can no longer center an economy on alienated mass production based on mass mindless employment. Something has to follow obsolete industrial capitalism the way industrial capitalism followed feudalism. The capitalist ruling class desperately casts about for its own justification while its world dissolves in an amorphous financial ism utterly divorced from the production and distribution of commodities. Fisher describes some of these desperate measures.