Chez Panisse Menu Cookbook

Chez Panisse Menu Cookbook

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Overview

“Chez Panisse is an extraordinary dining experience. . . . It is Alice Waters's brilliant gastronomic mind, her flair for cooking, and her almost revolutionary concept of menu planning that make Chez Panisse so exciting.”—James Beard

Justly famed for the originality of its ever-changing menu and the range and virtuosity of its chef and owner, Alice Waters, Chez Panisse is known throughout the world as one of America's greatest restaurants. Dinner there is always an adventure—a different five-course meal is offered every night, and the restaurant has seldom repeated a meal since its opening in 1971. Alice Waters is a brilliant pioneer of a wholly original cuisine, at once elegant and earthy, classical and experimental, joyous in its celebration of the very finest and freshest ingredients.

In this spectacular book, Alice Waters collects 120 of Chez Panisse's best menus, its most inspired transformations of classic French dishes. The Chez Panisse Menu Cookbook is filled with dishes redolent of the savory bouquet of teh garden, the appealing aromas and roasty flavors of food cooked over the charcoal grill, and the delicate sweetness of fish fresh from the sea. There are menus here for different seasons of the year, for picnics and outdoor barbecues and other great occasions. Handsomely designed and illustrated by David Lance Goines, this is an indispensable addition to the shelf of every great cook and cookbook readers. 

“A lovely book, wonderfully inventive, and the food is very pure.”—Richard Olney

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780679758181
Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
Publication date: 04/18/1995
Pages: 336
Sales rank: 290,964
Product dimensions: 7.15(w) x 9.07(h) x 0.69(d)

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INSPIRATIONS AND ADAPTATIONS
(Continues…)



Excerpted from "Chez Panisse Menu Cookbook"
by .
Copyright © 1995 Alice Waters.
Excerpted by permission of Random House Publishing Group.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Chez Panisse Menu Cookbook 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As a culinary student, I found Alice Water's book to to be incredibly sense arousing! The four pages on 'Composing A Menu' are invaluable themselves. The rest of this work presents several 5+ course meal menus including Hors d'Oeuvres to accompanying wines that will bring your guests to their knees. For the love of fresh mustard, add this book to your colection!
RoseCityReader on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
American foodies owe a debt of gratitude to Alice Waters. She is the patron saint of California cooking, or new American cooking, or whatever you want to call it. She¿s the one who gave us goat cheese croutons, roasted beets, mache, and so many other now-ubiquitous dishes. ¿Former Chez Panisse chef¿ is just as much a brand name as the brand named meats and produce she serves at her restaurant.For those reasons, I actually read The Chez Panisse Menu Cookbook cover to cover, the way one reads an MFK Fisher book ¿ to get an understanding of the cook¿s philosophy as well as recipes. Both women write in a formal style and have strong ideas about ingredients, preparation, presentation, and consumption. Unfortunately, Water¿s writing is more spare, perhaps as befits a patron saint, and lacks the pithy humor that leavens Fisher¿s books. Reading her prose is more like learning a lesson than being entertained. Which may be why this book struck me as an essential book for someone who wanted to learn to be a restaurant chef, but not particularly useful for someone cooking at home. Most of the menus require some final preparation of the next dish after the preceding one has been served ¿ possible in a restaurant, but not much fun at a dinner party if the cook wants to eat with the guests. The individual dishes are also complicated or labor-intensive, causing me to often think as I read, ¿I¿d eat that if someone made it for me.¿ Waters is particularly fond of leg of lamb, lobsters, and quail and her recipes for these show the difficulty in preparing them at home. First, most of the lamb recipes call for spit-roasting the leg of lamb. She even explains how to build a spit. In my spit-deficient kitchen, those recipes are not possible. Second, while I find a steamed lobster to be a wonderful treat on a special occasion, Waters takes the fun out of it with instructions to semi-cook a lobster, then remove the meat and make a fumet with the shells ¿ a process involving roasting the shells, making the broth, putting the shells in a blender, then straining the whole thing through a fine sieve ¿ then finish cooking the lobster. Whew!Finally, quail do not usually show up on my dinner table, but if they did, I do not think I¿d have the dedication to follow Walter¿s recipes. In most of her quail recipes she gives similar instructions: ¿Marinate the quail in a cool place overnight . . . turning the quail four to five times during this time.¿ No little boney bird is worth losing a night of sleep.Reading this Menu Cookbook made me want to spring for dinner at Chez Panisse, but it did not make me want to don an apron and start cooking.