Dateline: Toronto

Dateline: Toronto

by Ernest Hemingway

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Overview

Dateline: Toronto collects all 172 pieces that Hemingway published in the Star, including those under pseudonyms. Hemingway readers will discern his unique voice already present in many of these pieces, particularly his knack for dialogue. It is also fascinating to discover early reportorial accounts of events and subjects that figure in his later fiction. As William White points out in his introduction to this work, "Much of it, over sixty years later, can still be read both as a record of the early twenties and as evidence of how Ernest Hemingway learned the craft of writing." The enthusiasm, wit, and skill with which these pieces were written guarantee that Dateline: Toronto will be read for pleasure, as excellent journalism, and for the insights it gives to Hemingway's works.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780743241670
Publisher: Scribner
Publication date: 07/25/2002
Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 653
Sales rank: 904,397
File size: 811 KB

About the Author

Ernest Hemingway did more to influence the style of English prose than any other writer of his time. Publication of The Sun Also Rises and A Farewell to Arms immediately established him as one of the greatest literary lights of the 20th century. His classic novella The Old Man and the Sea won the Pulitzer Prize in 1953. Hemingway was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1954. He died in 1961.

Date of Birth:

July 21, 1899

Date of Death:

July 2, 1961

Place of Birth:

Oak Park, Illinois

Place of Death:

Ketchum, Idaho

Read an Excerpt


Introduction

By 1924 the by-line "By Ernest M. Hemingway" had become familiar to readers of the Toronto Star Weekly and its companion publication the Toronto Daily Star. From February 14, 1920, until September 13, 1924, Hemingway's pieces appeared in the Star Weekly, and from February 4, 1922, until October 6, 1923, he also contributed to the Daily Star. They were journalism, not short stories or imaginative fiction, but they played an important part in the development of a major American author.

When Hemingway began to write for the Toronto Star, he was completely unknown: his work had been published only in high school periodicals, in Oak Park, Illinois, and in the Kansas City Star, where he was an anonymous cub reporter. By the time his last article was printed in the Canadian newspaper, he had published only a few short stories and two little books in limited editions, Three Stories & Ten Poems (Paris, 1923) and in our time (Paris, 1924); however, his literary career had started. Yet before this career began, Hemingway's work with the Toronto Star Weekly and the Toronto Daily Star gave him a chance to make a living from his writings, while still in his twenties; an opportunity to see more of the world, especially Europe, at first hand while covering political, social, and military activities; and a few important years, while he was still impressionable and growing, to flex his not-yet literary muscles. From these years in Toronto, and reporting for Toronto readers as their foreign correspondent, came the creative writer and the author of some of the finest short stories and novels of our time.

In reprinting these 172 identifiable articles -- most of them signed "By Ernest M. Hemingway" -- I have relied on the original published texts in the weekly and daily Toronto Star editions. As is the usual newspaper practice, the manuscripts were destroyed shortly after they were set in type in the print shop, so we shall never know exactly what Hemingway wrote, and what the Toronto copyreader added, deleted, or changed. I have not "corrected" Hemingway in the way Emily Dickinson's early editors "corrected" her poetry, though I have changed typographical errors made by linotype operators and missed by proofreaders; and where editors have missed Hemingway's notorious misspellings, such as in German placenames, I have silently spelled the word correctly. To have left it in its original wrong form would have achieved nothing. Though the star editors or copyreaders may have added commas in Hemingway's sentences, I have changed punctuation only on a few occasions where necessary for clarity or understanding or identity. In a very few cases I have added a word in square brackets for the same reasons. In the rare cases of doubtful grammar, I have made no changes. Hemingway may well have been writing idiomatically, or, even then, before he had fully developed his narrative style, valuing the way in which he said a thing more highly than grammatical niceties.

As for the titles, they were almost always newspaper headlines written on the Toronto Daily Star or Star Weekly copydesks according to the place and space of the articles on the newspaper page. They were rarely, if ever, by Hemingway himself. Thus, for bibliographical and historical purposes, I have put the original headings in the Table of Contents, and I have given the pieces more convenient and shorter titles in place of head lines. I have deleted all Subheads in the stories. They, too, were not written by Hemingway but usually by the copyclesk purely for typographical reasons to break up the large pages. In datelines on all out-of-Toronto news stories, I have retained the names of cities from which they were filed but removed the dates, for the more important dates of publication in the Star appear immediately below the titles.

"By Ernest M. Hemingway" -- the "M." was not dropped until later -- appears on all but thirty-five of the dispatches, a few times misspelled, and twice "E. M. Hemingway." One piece is by-lined "Hem." On twenty-four occasions the articles were unsigned; W. L. McGeary, librarian of the Toronto Star, to whom we are deeply indebted, has used office records and other verifiable evidence to attribute many of these to Hemingway. I am also greatly indebted to Randall Scott Davis of La Crescenta, California, for discovering and identifying fourteen unsigned Hemingway contributions to the Toronto Star and the Star Weekly and two contributions with the by-line "By A Foreigner." In addition, Hemingway used as a pseudonym the name of his then-newborn son, John Hadley, six times, usually because he had other signed pieces in the same issue of the Star. For the same reason he once used the by-line Peter Jackson, an invented name.

Unsigned pieces and those with by-lines other than "By Ernest M. Hemingway" or "By E. M. Hemingway" are noted in the Table of Contents. I have included one short piece entitled "Miss Megan George Makes Hit: 'A Wonder' Reporters Call Her," published in the Daily Star, October 6, 1923, which Professor Carlos Baker has attributed to Miss Isobel Simmons of Oak Park, Illinois -- because it carries Hemingway's by-line.

Here, arranged chronologically between the covers of one volume for the first time, are all of Hemingway's writings for the Toronto Star. Twenty-nine of these articles appear in my own By-Line: Ernest Hemingway (Charles Scribner's Sons, 1967). In spite of the novelist's well-known resistance to efforts to collect his newspaper articles, no apology need be made for his reporting as reporting. Given Hemingway's own rules for seeing what he saw and putting his pieces together in his own way, sometimes in an unorthodox way, it is fine stuff of which the Toronto Daily Star and the Toronto Star Weekly were proud. And much of it, over sixty years later, can still be read both as a record of the early Twenties and as evidence of how Ernest Hemingway learned the craft of writing.

William White

Table of Contents

Contents
Foreword by Charles Scribner, Jr.
Introduction
CIRCULATING PICTURES
Circulating Pictures a New High-Art Idea in Toronto
(unsigned)
The Toronto Star Weekly, February 14, 1920
A FREE SHAVE
Taking a Chance for a Free Shave
The Toronto Star Weekly, March 6, 1920
SPORTING MAYOR
Sporting Mayor at Boxing Bouts
The Toronto Star Weekly, March 13, 1920
POPULAR IN PEACE-SLACKER IN WAR
How to Be Popular in Peace Though a Slacker in War
The Toronto Star Weekly, March 13, 1920
STORE THIEVES' TRICKS
Store Thieves Use Three Tricks
The Toronto Star Weekly, April 3, 1920
TROUT FISHING
Are You All Set for the Trout? (unsigned)
The Toronto Star Weekly, April 10, 1920
TOOTH PULLING NO CURE-ALL
Tooth Pulling Not a Cure-for-All
The Toronto Star Weekly, April 10, 1920
LIEUTENANTS' MUSTACHES
Lieutenants' Mustaches the Only Permanent Thing We Got Out of War
The Toronto Star Weekly, April 10, 1920
FASHION GRAVEYARDS
Stores in the Wild Graveyards of Style
The Toronto Star Weekly, April 24, 1920
TROUT-FISHING HINTS
Fishing for Trout in a Sporting Way
The Toronto Star Weekly, April 24, 1920
BUYING COMMISSION WOULD CUT OUT WASTE
Buying Commission Would Cut Out Waste (unsigned)
The Toronto Daily Star, April 26, 1920
CAR PRESTIGE
Keeping Up with the Joneses, the Tragedy of the Other Half
The Toronto Star Weekly, May 1, 1920
PRIZEFIGHT WOMEN
Toronto Women Who Went to Prize Fight Applauded the Rough Stuff
The Toronto Star Weekly, May 15, 1920
GALLOPING DOMINOES
Galloping Dominoes, Alias African Golf, Taken Up by Toronto's Smart Set
The Toronto Star Weekly, May 22, 1920
PHOTO PORTRAITS
Prices for "Likenesses" Run from Twenty-five Cents to $500 in Toronto
The Toronto Star Weekly, May 29, 1920
FOX FARMING
Canadian Fox-Ranching Pays Since the Wild-Cats Let the Foxes Alone
The Toronto Star Weekly, May 29, 1920
RUM-RUNNING
Canuck Whiskey Pouring in U. S.
The Toronto Star Weekly, June 5, 1920
THE HAMILTON GAG
It's Time to Bury the Hamilton Gag, Comedians Have Worked It to Death
The Toronto Star Weekly, June 12, 1920
CAMPING OUT
When You Camp Out, Do It Right
The Toronto Star Weekly, June 26, 1920
TED'S SKEETERS
When You Go Camping Take Lots of Skeeter Dope and Don't Ever Lose It
The Toronto Star Weekly, August 7, 1920
THE BEST RAINBOW TROUT FISHING
The Best Rainbow Trout Fishing in the World Is at the Canadian Soo
The Toronto Star Weekly, August 28, 1920
CANADIANS: WILD/TAME
The Average Yank Divides Canadians into Two Classes -- Wild and Tame
The Toronto Star Weekly, October 9, 1920
CARPENTIER VS. DEMPSEY
Carpentier Sure to Give Dempsey Fight Worth While
The Toronto Star Weekly, October 30, 1920
WILD WEST: CHICAGO
The Wild West Is Now in Chicago
The Toronto Star Weekly, November 6, 1920
NEWSPAPERMEN'S POCKETS
No Danger of Commercial Tie-up Because Men Carry Too Much Money
The Toronto Star Weekly, November 6, 1920
INDOOR FISHING
A Fight With a 20-Pound Trout
The Toronto Star Weekly, November 20, 1920
PLAIN AND FANCY KILLINGS, $400 UP
Plain and Fancy Killings, $400 Up
The Toronto Star Weekly, December 11, 1920
TRADING CELEBRITIES
Why Not Trade Other Public Entertainers Among the Nations as the Big Leagues Do Baseball Players?
The Toronto Star Weekly, February 19, 1921
OUR CONFIDENTIAL VACATION GUIDE
Our Confidential Vacation Guide
The Toronto Star Weekly, May 21, 1921
BALLOT BULLETS
Gun-men's Wild Political War on in Chicago
The Toronto Star Weekly, May 28, 1921
CHICAGO NEVER WETTER THAN TODAY
Chicago Never Wetter Than It Is To-day
The Toronto Star Weekly, July 2, 1921
CONDENSING THE CLASSICS
Condensing the Classics
The Toronto Star Weekly, August 20, 1921
MUSCLE SHOALS: CHEAP NITRATES
Cheap Nitrates Will Mean Cheaper Bread
The Toronto Star Weekly, November 12, 1921
ON WEDDYNGE GYFTES
On Weddynge Gyftes
The Toronto Star Weekly, December 17, 1921
TOURISTS SCARCE AT SWISS RESORTS
Tourists Are Scarce at the Swiss Resorts
The Toronto Daily Star, February 4, 1922
LIVING ON $1,000 A YEAR IN PARIS
A Canadian With One Thousand a Year Can Live Very Comfortably and Enjoyably in Paris
The Toronto Star Weekly, February 4, 1922
POINCARÉS FOLLY
France Now in Hands of Old Professionals
The Toronto Daily Star, February 4, 1922
TUNA FISHING IN SPAIN
At Vigo, in Spain, Is Where You Catch the Silver and Blue Tuna, the King of All Fish
The Toronto Star Weekly, February 18, 1922
CLEMENCEAU POLITICALLY DEAD
Builder, Not Fighter, Is What France Wants
The Toronto Daily Star, February 18, 1922
GERMAN EXPORT TAX HITS PROFITEERS
Exchange Pirates Hit by German Export Tax
The Toronto Star Weekly, February 25, 1922
PARIS IS FULL OF RUSSIANS
Influx of Russians to All Parts of Paris
The Toronto Daily Star, February 25, 1922
PAPAL POLL: BEHIND THE SCENES
Behind the Scenes at Papal Election
The Toronto Star Weekly, March 4, 1922
TRY BOBSLEDDING IF YOU WANT THRILLS
Try Bobsledding If You Want Thrills
The Toronto Daily Star, March 4, 1922
THE HOTELS IN SWITZERLAND
Queer Mixture of Aristocrats, Profiteers, Sheep and Wolves at the Hotels in Switzerland
The Toronto Star Weekly, March 4, 1922
WIVES BUY CLOTHES FOR FRENCH HUSBANDS
Wives Buy Clothes for French Husbands
The Toronto Star Weekly, March 11, 1922
TIP THE POSTMAN EVERY TIME?
How'd You Like to Tip Postman Every Time?
The Toronto Star Weekly, March 11, 1922

POINCARÉ'S ELECTION PROMISES
Poincarè Making Good on Election Promises
The Toronto Daily Star, March 11, 1922
SPARROW HAT ON PARIS BOULEVARDS
Sparrow Hat Appears on Paris Boulevards
The Toronto Star Weekly, March 18, 1922
THE LUGE OF SWITZERLAND
Flivver, Canoe, Prarn and Taxi Combined in the Luge,
Joy of Everybody in Switzerland
The Toronto Star Weekly, March 18, 1922
BLACK NOVEL A STORM CENTER
Prize-Winning Book Is Centre of Storm
The Toronto Star Weekly, March 25, 1922
AMERICAN BOHEMIANS IN PARIS
American Bohemians in Paris a Weird Lot
The Toronto Star Weekly, March 25, 1922
WILD NIGHT MUSIC OF PARIS
Wild Night Music of Paris Makes Visitor Feel a Man of the World
The Toronto Star Weekly, March 25, 1922
THE MECCA OF FAKERS
The Mecca of Fakers in French Capital
The Toronto Daily Star, March 25, 1922
M. DEIBLER, A MUCH-FEARED MAN
Much-Feared Man Is Monsieur Deibler
The Toronto Daily Star, April 1, 1922
95,000 WEAR THE LEGION OF HONOR
95,000 Now Wearing the Legion of Honor
The Toronto Daily Star, April 1, 1922
ACTIVE FRENCH ANTI-ALCOHOL LEAGUE
Anti-Alcohol League Is Active in France
The Toronto Daily Star, April 8, 1922
CANADA'S RECOGNITION OF RUSSIA
Canada's Chief Interest Recognition of Russia (unsigned)
The Toronto Daily Star, April 10, 1922
TCHITCHERIN SPEAKS AT GENOA CONFERENCE
World Economic Conference Opens in Genoa: Tchitcherin Speaks
The Toronto Daily Star, April 10, 1922
ITALIAN PREMIER
Italian Premier Strikes Keynote (unsigned)
The Toronto Daily Star, April 10, 1922
TCHITCHERIN WANTS JAPAN EXCLUDED
Tchitcherin at It Again, Wants Jap Excluded
The Toronto Daily Star, April 11, 1922
GENOA CONFERENCE
Picked Sharpshooters Patrol Genoa Streets
The Toronto Daily Star, April 13, 1922
OBJECTIONS TO ALLIED PLAN
Russia and Germany Object to Allied Plan (unsigned)
The Toronto Daily Star, April 13, 1922
RUSSIAN CLAIMS
Russian Claims to Offset Allies' (unsigned)
The Toronto Daily Star, April 14, 1922
PARISIAN BOORISHNESS
French Politeness
The Toronto Star Weekly, April 15, 1922
WOMAN TAKES CRUMBS
Woman, Lovely Woman, Resents Slight, Is Forced to Take Crumbs at Genoa (unsigned)
The Toronto Daily Star, April 15, 1922
RUSSIANS HOLD UP PROGRESS
Progress Held Up at Genoa Parley by the Russians (unsigned)
The Toronto Daily Star, April 17, 1922
GERMAN MACHIAVELLIANISM
Regarded by Allies as German Cunning
The Toronto Daily Star, April 18, 1922
GERMAN BLOW -- DISLOYAL?
"Is Germany's Most Sinister Blow at the Allies, Most Striking Disloyal Act Ever Accomplished" (unsigned)
The Toronto Daily Star, April 18, 1922
BARTHOU REFUSES CONFERENCE
Barthou Refuses to Confer with Russians and Germans (unsigned)
The Toronto Daily Star, April 18, 1922
RUSSIAN GIRLS AT GENOA
Two Russian Girls the Best-Looking at Genoa Parley
The Toronto Daily Star, April 24, 1922
BARTHOU CROSSES HISSING TCHITCHERIN
Barthou, Like a Smith Brother, Crosses Hissing Tchitcherin
The Toronto Daily Star, April 24, 1922
STAMBOULISKI OF BULGARIA
Strongest Premier in Parley Is Stambouliski of Bulgaria
The Toronto Daily Star, April 25, 1922
SCHOBER EVERY INCH A CHANCELLOR
Schober of Austria, at Genoa, Looks Every Inch a Chancellor
The Toronto Daily Star, April 26, 1922
THE UNWORLDLY RUSSIANS
Russian Delegates at Genoa Appear Not to Be of This World
The Toronto Star, April 27, 1922
GERMAN DELEGATION AT GENOA
German Delegation at Genoa Keep Stinnes in Background
The Toronto Daily Star, April 28, 1922
A HOT BATH AN ADVENTURE IN GENOA
Getting a Hot Bath an Adventure in Genoa
The Toronto Daily Star, May 2, 1922
WELL-GUARDED RUSSIAN DELEGATION
Russian Delegation Well Guarded at Genoa
The Toronto Daily Star, May 4, 1922
GERMAN JOURNALISTS A STRANGE COLLECTION
German Journalists a Strange Collection
The Toronto Daily Star, May 8, 1922
NEW BETTING GAME: TENNIS TAMBURELLO
All Genoa Goes Crazy Over New Betting Game
The Toronto Daily Star, May 9, 1922
LLOYD GEORGE'S MAGIC
Lloyd George Gives Magic to the Parley
The Toronto Daily Star, May 13, 1922
FISHING THE RHÔNE CANAL
There Are Great Fish in the Rhône Canal
The Toronto Daily Star, June 10, 1922
FASCISTI PARTY HALF-MILLION
Fascisti Party Now Half-Million Strong
The Toronto Daily Star, June 24, 1922
ITALY'S BLACKSHIRTS
"Pot-Shot Patriots" Unpopular in Italy
The Toronto Star Weekly, June 24, 1922
A VETERAN VISITS THE OLD FRONT
A Veteran Visits Old Front, Wishes He Had Stayed Away
The Toronto Daily Star, July 22, 1922
SINCLAIR LEWIS'S HORSEBACKING
Expecting Too Much in Old London Town
The Toronto Star Weekly, August 5, 1922
THE GREAT "APÉRITIF" SCANDAL
Latest Drink Scandal Now Agitates Paris
The Toronto Star Weekly, August 12, 1922
DID POINCARÉ LAUGH IN VERDUN CEMETERY?
Did Poincar6 Laugh in Verdun Cemetery?
The Toronto Daily Star, August 12, 1922
RUG VENDORS IN PARIS
Rug Vendor Is Fixture in Parisian Life
The Toronto Daily Star, August 12, 1922
OLD ORDER CHANGETH IN ALSACE-LORRAINE
Old Order Changeth in Alsace-Lorraine
The Toronto Daily Star, August 26, 1922
HOMES ON THE SEINE
Takes to the Water, Solves Flat Problem
The Toronto Daily Star, August 26, 1922
GERMANS DESPERATE OVER THE MARK
Germans Are Doggedly Sullen or Desperate Over the Mark
The Toronto Daily Star, September 1, 1922
FISHING IN BADEN PERFECT
Once Over Permit Obstacle, Fishing in Baden Perfect
The Toronto Daily Star, September 2, 1922
GERMAN INNKEEPERS
German Inn-Keepers Rough Dealing with "Auslanders"
The Toronto Daily Star, September 5, 1922
A PARIS-TO-STRASBOURG FLIGHT
A Paris-to-Strasbourg Flight Shows Living Cubist Picture
The Toronto Daily Star, September 9, 1922
GERMAN INFLATION
Crossing to Germany Is Way to Make Money
The Toronto Daily Star, September 19, 1922
BRITISH CAN SAVE CONSTANTINOPLE
British Strong Enough to Save Constantinople
The Toronto Daily Star, September 30, 1922
HUBBY DINES FIRST, WIFIE GETS CRUMBS!
Hubby Dines First, Wifie Gets Crumbs!
The Toronto Daily Star, September 30, 1922
GERMAN RIOTS
Riots Are Frequent Throughout Germany
The Toronto Star Weekly, September 30, 1922
BRITISH PLANES
British Airplanes Over Turk Capital (unsigned)
The Toronto Daily Star, September 30, 1922
BRITISH ORDER KEMAL TO QUIT CHANAK
British Again Order Kemal to Quit Chanak (unsigned)
The Toronto Daily Star, September 30, 1922
HARINGTON WON'T DEMAND EVACUATION
Harington Not to Demand Evacuation of Shores (unsigned)
The Toronto Daily Star, October 2, 1922
TURK RED CRESCENT PROPAGANDA AGENCY
Turk Red Crescent Propaganda Agency
The Toronto Daily Star, October 4, 1922
HAMID BEY
Hamid Bey Wears Shirt Tucked In When Seen by Star
The Toronto Daily Star, October 9, 1922
TURKS NEAR CONSTANTINOPLE
Turk Forces Draw Near to Constantinople (unsigned)
The Toronto Daily Star, October 9, 1922
BALKANS: A PICTURE OF PEACE, NOT WAR
Balkans Look Like Ontario, a Picture of Peace, Not War
The Toronto Daily Star, October 16, 1922
CHRISTIANS LEAVE THRACE TO TURKS
Tired Christians, and Hungry, Leave Thrace to Turks (unsigned)
The Toronto Daily Star, October 16, 1922
CONSTANTINOPLE, DIRTY WHITE, NOT GLISTENING AND SINISTER
Constantinople, Dirty White, Not Glistening and Sinister
The Toronto Daily Star, October 18, 1922
WAITING FOR AN ORGY
Constantinople Cut-Throats Await Chance for an Orgy
The Toronto Daily Star, October 19, 1922
A SILENT, GHASTLY PROCESSION
A Silent, Ghastly Procession Wends Way from Thrace
The Toronto Daily Star, October 20, 1922
RUSSIA SPOILING THE FRENCH GAME
Russia to Spoil the French Game With Kernalists
The Toronto Daily Star, October 23, 1922
TURKS DISTRUST KEMAL PASHA
Turks Beginning to Show Distrust of Kemal Pasha
The Toronto Daily Star, October 24, 1922
NEAR EAST CENSOR TOO "THOROUGH"
Censor Too "Thorough" in the Near East Crisis
The Toronto Daily Star, October 25, 1922
"OLD CONSTAN"
"Old Constan" in True Light is Tough Town
The Toronto Daily Star, October 28, 1922
AFGHANS: TROUBLE FOR BRITAIN
Kemal Has Afghans Ready to Make Trouble for Britain
The Toronto Daily Star, October 31, 1922
THE GREEK REVOLT
Betrayal Preceded Defeat, Then Came Greek Revolt
The Toronto Daily Star, November 3, 1922
KEMAL'S ONE SUBMARINE
Destroyers Were on Lookout for Kemal's One Submarine
The Toronto Daily Star, November 10, 1922
REFUGEES FROM THRACE
Refugee Procession is Scene of Horror
The Toronto Daily Star, November 14, 1922
MUSSOLINI, EUROPE'S PRIZE BLUFFER
Mussolini, Europe's Prize Bluffer, More Like Bottomley Than Napoleon
The Toronto Daily Star, January 27, 1923
RUSSIAN UNIFORMS
Gaudy Uniform Is Tchitcherin's Weakness: A "Chocolate Soldier" of the Soviet Army
The Toronto Daily Star, February 10, 1923
THE FRANCO-GERMAN SITUATION
A Victory Without Peace Forced the French to Undertake the Occupation of the Ruhr
The Toronto Daily Star, April 14, 1923
FRENCH ROYALIST PARTY
French Royalist Party Most Solidly Organized
The Toronto Daily Star, April 18, 1923
GOVERNMENT PAYS FOR NEWS
Government Pays for News in French Papers
The Toronto Daily Star, April 21, 1923
THE "BATTLE" OF OFFENBURG
Ruhr Commercial War Question of Bankruptcy
The Toronto Daily Star, April 25, 1923
THE BELGIAN LADY AND THE GERMAN HATER
A Brave Belgian Lady Shuts Up German Hater
The Toronto Daily Star, April 28, 1923
GETTING INTO GERMANY
Getting into Germany Quite a Job, Nowadays
The Toronto Daily Star, May 2, 1923
IT'S EASY TO SPEND A MILLION MARKS
Quite Easy to Spend a Million, If in Marks
The Toronto Daily Star, May 5, 1923
STARVERS OUT OF SIGHT
Amateur Starvers Keep Out of View in Germany
The Toronto Daily Star, May 9, 1923
HATE IN THE RUHR IS REAL
Hate in Occupied Zone a Real, Concrete Thing
The Toronto Daily Star, May 12, 1923
FRENCH SPEED WITH MOVIES ON THE JOB
French Register Speed When Movies Are on job
The Toronto Daily Star, May 16, 1923
KING BUSINESS IN EUROPE
King Business in Europe Isn't What It Used to Be
The Toronto Star Weekly, September 15, 1923
SEARCH FOR SUDBURY COAL
Search for Sudbury Coal a Gamble, Driller Tells of What He Has Found
The Toronto Daily Star, September 25, 1923
JAPANESE EARTHQUAKE
Tossed About on Land Like Ships in a Storm (unsigned)
The Toronto Daily Star, September 25, 1923
LORD BIRKENHEAD
He's a Personality, No Doubt, But a Much Maligned One (unsigned)
The Toronto Daily Star, October 4, 1923
LLOYD GEORGE WILLING TO ADDRESS 10,000
Lloyd George Willing to Address 10,000 Here
The Toronto Daily Star, October 5, 1923
THE ARRIVAL OF LLOYD GEORGE
LL. George Up Early as Big Liner Arrives
The Toronto Daily Star, October 5, 1923
THE LITTLE WELSHMAN LANDS
Little Welshman Lands; Anxious to Play Golf
The Toronto Daily Star, October 6, 1923
LLOYD GEORGE'S WONDERFUL VOICE
Wonderful Voice Is Chief Charm of Lloyd George
The Toronto Daily Star, October 6, 1923
MISS MEGAN GEORGE A HIT
Miss Megan George Makes Hit: "A Wonder" Reporters Call Her
The Toronto Daily Star, October 6, 1923
AT THE THEATER WITH LLOYD GEORGE
Lloyd George Attends Theatre in New York
The Toronto Star Weekly, October 6, 1923
HEARST NOT PAYING LLOYD GEORGE
Cope Denies Hearst Paying Lloyd George
The Toronto Star Weekly, October 6, 1923
"A MAN OF THE PEOPLE"
"A Man of the People, Will Fight for the People" (unsigned)
The Toronto Daily Star, October 8, 1923
COUNT APPONYI AND THE LOAN
Hungarian Statesman Delighted With Loan (unsigned)
The Toronto Daily Star, October 15, 1923
BULLFIGHTING A TRAGEDY
Bull-Fighting Is Not a Sport -- It Is a Tragedy
The Toronto Star Weekly, October 20, 1923
PAMPLONA IN JULY
World's Series of Bull Fighting a Mad, Whirling Carnival
The Toronto Star Weekly, October 27, 1923
GAME-SHOOTING IN EUROPE
More Game to Shoot in Crowded Europe Than in Ontario; Forests and Animals Are Really Protected Over There
The Toronto Daily Star, November 3, 1923
THE LAKES AREN'T GOING DRY
Cheer Up! The Lakes Aren't Going Dry: High Up and Low Down Is Just Their Habit (by John Hadley)
The Toronto Star Weekly, November 17, 1923
TROUT FISHING IN EUROPE
Trout Fishing All Across Europe: Spain Has the Best, Then Germany
The Toronto Star Weekly, November 17, 1923
GARGOYLES AS SYMBOL
Is France's Present Attitude Toward Germany Symbolized in the Gargoyles of Notre Dame? (unsigned)
The Toronto Star Weekly, November 17, 1923
THE SPORT OF KINGS
The Sport of Kings (by Hem.)
The Toronto Star Weekly, November 24, 1923
WILD GASTRONOMIC ADVENTURES OF A GOURMET
Wild Gastronomic Adventures of a Gourmet, Eating Sea Slugs, Snails, Octopus, Etc. for Fun (by Peter Jackson)
The Toronto Star Weekly, November 24, 1923
THE BIG DANCE ON THE HILL
The Big Dance on the Hill
The Toronto Star Weekly, November 24, 1923
WOLFE'S DIARIES
Gen. Wolfe's Diaries Saved for Canada
The Toronto Star Weekly, November 24, 1923
TANCREDO IS DEAD
Tancredo Is Dead
The Toronto Star Weekly, November 24, 1923
"NOBELMAN" YEATS
Learns to Commune With the Fairies, Now Wins the $40,000 Nobel Prize (unsigned)
The Toronto Star Weekly, November 24, 1923
CHANGED BELIEFS
Changed Beliefs (by A Foreigner)
The Toronto Star Weekly, November 24, 1923
BANK VAULTS VS. CRACKSMEN
Fifty-Ton Doors Laugh at Robbers' Tools, Bank Vaults Defy Scientific Cracksmen
The Toronto Star Weekly, December 1, 1923
INFLATION AND THE GERMAN MARK
German Marks Make Last Stand as Real Money in Toronto's "Ward" (by John Hadley)
The Toronto Star Weekly, December 8, 1923
WAR MEDALS FOR SALE
Lots of War Medals for Sale but Nobody Will Buy Them
The Toronto Star Weekly, December 8, 1923
EUROPEAN NIGHTLIFE: A DISEASE
Night Life in Europe a Disease: Constantinople's Most Hectic
The Toronto Star Weekly, December 15, 1923
GOITER AND IODINE
Dose Whole City's Water Supply to Cure Goiter by Mass Medication (by John Hadley)
The Toronto Star Weekly, December 15, 1923
I LIKE AMERICANS
I Like Americans (by A Foreigner)
The Toronto Star Weekly, December 15, 1923
I LIKE CANADIANS
I Like Canadians (by A Foreigner)
The Toronto Star Weekly, December 15, 1923
THE BLIND MAN'S CHRISTMAS EVE
The Blind Man's Christmas Eve (by John Hadley)
The Toronto Star Weekly, December 22, 1923
CHRISTMAS ON THE ROOF OF THE WORLD
Christmas on the Roof of the World
The Toronto Star Weekly, December 22, 1923
W. B. YEATS A NIGHT HAWK
W. B. Yeats a Night Hawk: Kept Toronto Host Up (unsigned)
The Toronto Star Weekly, December 22, 1923
YOUNG COMMUNISTS
Toronto "Red" Children Don't Know Santa Claus (unsigned)
The Toronto Star Weekly, December 22, 1923
BETTING IN TORONTO
Toronto is Biggest Betting Place in North America: 10,000 People Bet $100,000 on Horses Every Day
The Toronto Star Weekly, December 29, 1923
McCONKEY'S 1914 ORGY
Wild New Year's Eve Gone Forever: Only Ghost of 1914 Party Remains (by John Hadley)
The Toronto Star Weekly, December 29, 1923
OUR MODERN AMATEUR IMPOSTORS
Weird, Wild Adventures of Some of Our Modern Amateur Impostors
The Toronto Star Weekly, December 29, 1923
SWISS AVALANCHES
Skiers' Only Escape from Alpine Avalanche is to Swim!
Snow Slides Off Mountain as Fast as Off Roof of House
The Toronto Star Weekly, January 12, 1924
SO THIS IS CHICAGO
So This Is Chicago
The Toronto Star Weekly, January 19, 1924
THE FREIBURG FEDORA
Must Wear Hats Like Other Folks if You Live in Toronto (by John Hadley)
The Toronto Star Weekly, January 19, 1924
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