Einstein's Telescope: The Hunt for Dark Matter and Dark Energy in the Universe

Einstein's Telescope: The Hunt for Dark Matter and Dark Energy in the Universe

by Evalyn Gates

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Overview

In 1936, Albert Einstein predicted that gravitational distortions would allow space itself to act as a telescope far more powerful than humans could ever build. Now, cosmologists at the forefront of their field are using this radical technique (“Einsteins's Telescope”) to detect the invisible. In fresh, engaging prose, astrophysicist Evalyn Gates explains how this tool is enabling scientists to uncover planets as big as the Earth, discover black holes that whirl through space, and trace the evolution of cosmic architecture over billions of years. Powerful and accessible, Einstein's Telescope takes us to the brink of revolution in our understanding of the deepest mysteries of the Universe.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780393338010
Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date: 02/22/2010
Pages: 305
Product dimensions: 5.40(w) x 8.10(h) x 1.00(d)

About the Author

Evalyn Gates is the assistant director of the Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, a senior research associate at the University of Chicago, and the former astronomy director of the Adler Planetarium. Her writing has appeared in Physics Today and the Chicago Tribune.

Table of Contents

Preface ix

Acknowledgments xi

Glossary of Acronyms xiii

Chapter 1 What Is the Universe Made Of? 3

Chapter 2 A Revolution in Space and Time 32

Chapter 3 A Cosmic Expansion 54

Chapter 4 Einstein's Telescope 67

Chapter 5 MACHOs and WIMPs 90

Chapter 6 Black Holes and Planets 112

Chapter 7 Weighing the Universe 137

Chapter 8 Cold Dark Matter 159

Chapter 9 Tracing the Invisible-and Finding Dark Matter 178

Chapter 10 An Accelerating Universe 196

Chapter 11 The Imprint of Dark Energy on the Cosmic Web 225

Chapter 12 Gravity Waves 248

Epilogue Dark Matter and Dark Energy: Keys to the Next Revolution 266

Notes 271

Illustration Acknowledgments 290

Index 293

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Einstein's Telescope: The Hunt for Dark Matter and Dark Energy in the Universe 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 19 reviews.
MKWIN More than 1 year ago
EINSTEIN'S TELESCOPE is a fantastic story from modern cosmology.The author explains gracefully about Dark Matter ,Dark Energy and Gravitational Lensing and tells us,why we know they are there and how we are trying to see them.She guides the readers in a clear and straightforward manner to gain insight in to mysteries of the universe.
Blubmin More than 1 year ago
Found beneath the cover of Einstein's Telescope is a book that manages to explain the complex theories behind gravitational lensing in a way that appeals to the layman without dumbing anything down. Assuredly it will appeal to any lover of the cosmic and easily captivates a curiosity of it. Regardless of knowledge of the subject of relativity, author Gates provides an ample exploration into the history of the theories upon which this book is based. It is upon this foundation that the rest of the book (especially the latter chapters) rest upon. 40 illustrations and diagrams dot the pages of the book and are effective tools in understanding many of the basic theories that Gates brings up. Through the course of the book, Gates manages to paint a modern comprehension of what the Universe is made of and where it is going. Gates (Ph.D. in Theoretical Particle Physics) remarks on the works of modern and past scientists and their efforts to explain why the universe is expanding and what that means to our current theories. Many questions are brought up and many are left unanswered. From this we're given a sense that perhaps the more we delve into the mechanics of the universe, the less we will truly know - a fact that is just about as frightening as it is intriguing. One thing is certain, however, that the impact of Einstein on the scientific community will most definitely continue through the use of gravitational lensing (Einstein's Telescope). Overall, this book is a beautiful introduction to something seemingly unreachable by any non-scientist. It flows in a very chronological manner which makes following only that much easier. From 1917 to the 2000's we see a progression in human comprehension that is bound to enthrall all the curious, science-loving people out there.
bareshiyth More than 1 year ago
Great writing, good basic science, and the best skinny on a really useful development in cosmological and astronomical science one could ask for!
saturn_reads on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Einstein's Telescope, by Evalyn Gates, demonstrates the impact of gravitational lensing on our ability to measure, ¿see,¿ and understand the universe. With an ultimate focus on the search for dark matter and dark energy, Gates effectively explains gravitational lensing ¿ starting, for the lay reader, with the basic tenets of general relativity. Einstein's Telescope is a fascinating look at one of the hottest areas of cosmology for the scientist and non-scientist, alike, and will certainly change the way you look at the night sky.If I have any criticism, it's that the author exposes an apparent bias toward experimental vs. theoretical science. That, however, should not prevent you from picking up the book.
ees4 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Whew! It took me six weeks to get through this astrophysics book. I haven't picked up a physics book since high school and was hesitant to start reading this. While this book was interesting, the subject matter was intense and I found myself re-reading sections two or three times to ensure I comprehended the concepts. Evalyn Gates does an excellent job of explaining Einstein's theories and how they are harnessing those theories to explore dark matter and dark energy.
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