Fatal Invention: How Science, Politics, and Big Business Re-create Race in the Twenty-First Century

Fatal Invention: How Science, Politics, and Big Business Re-create Race in the Twenty-First Century

by Dorothy Roberts

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Overview

An incisive, groundbreaking book that examines how a biological concept of race is a myth that promotes inequality in a supposedly “post-racial” era.
 
Though the Human Genome Project proved that human beings are not naturally divided by race, the emerging fields of personalized medicine, reproductive technologies, genetic genealogy, and DNA databanks are attempting to resuscitate race as a biological category written in our genes.
 
This groundbreaking book by legal scholar and social critic Dorothy Roberts examines how the myth of race as a biological concept—revived by purportedly cutting-edge science, race-specific drugs, genetic testing, and DNA databases—continues to undermine a just society and promote inequality in a supposedly “post-racial” era. Named one of the ten best black nonfiction books 2011 by AFRO.com, Fatal Invention offers a timely and “provocative analysis” (Nature) of race, science, and politics that “is consistently lucid . . . alarming but not alarmist, controversial but evidential, impassioned but rational” (Publishers Weekly, starred review).
 
“Everyone concerned about social justice in America should read this powerful book.”
—Anthony D. Romero, executive director, American Civil Liberties Union
 
“A terribly important book on how the ‘fatal invention’ has terrifying effects in the post-genomic, ‘post-racial’ era.” —Eduardo Bonilla-Silva, professor of sociology, Duke University, and author of Racism Without Racists: Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in the United States
 
Fatal Invention is a triumph! Race has always been an ill-defined amalgam of medical and cultural bias, thinly overlaid with the trappings of contemporary scientific thought. And no one has peeled back the layers of assumption and deception as lucidly as Dorothy Roberts.” —Harriet A. Washington, author of and Deadly Monopolies: The Shocking Corporate Takeover of Life Itself
 

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781595586919
Publisher: New Press, The
Publication date: 06/14/2011
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 400
Sales rank: 340,829
File size: 705 KB

About the Author

Dorothy Roberts is the fourteenth Penn Integrates Knowledge Professor at the University of Pennsylvania, where she is a George A. Weiss University Professor of Law and Sociology and the inaugural Raymond Pace and Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander Professor of Civil Rights. She is the author of the award-winning Killing the Black Body and Shattered Bonds and is the co-editor of six books on gender and constitutional law. She serves as chair of the board of directors of the Black Women’s Healthy Imperative and lives in Evanston, Illinois.

Table of Contents

Preface
Part I: Believing in Race in the Genomic Age
1. The Invention of Race
2. Separating Racial Science from Racism
Part II: The New Racial Science
3. Redefining Race in Genetic Terms
4. Medical Stereotyping
5. The Allure of Race in Biomedical Research
6. Embodying Race
Part III: The New Racial Technology
7. Pharmacoethnicity
8. Color-Coded Pills
9. Race and the New Biocitizen
10. Tracing Racial Roots
Part IV: The New Biopolitics of Race
11. Genetic Surveillance
12. Biological Race in a “Postracial” America
Conclusion: The Crossroads
Acknowledgments
Notes
Index

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Fatal Invention: How Science, Politics, and Big Business Re-create Race in the Twenty-First Century 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
reluctantm on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
While I agree with many of the arguments presented in this book, I don't feel they are presented as clearly or persuasively as necessary. Definitely as the book progresses, the arguments become clearer, but I found the first section hard to follow with parts unclear.