Girl Meets Boy: Because There Are Two Sides to Every Story

Girl Meets Boy: Because There Are Two Sides to Every Story

by Kelly Milner Halls

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781452111438
Publisher: Chronicle Books LLC
Publication date: 12/16/2011
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 204
Lexile: HL790L (what's this?)
File size: 399 KB
Age Range: 14 - 17 Years

About the Author

Kelly Milner Halls is the author of Albino Animals and Tales of the Cryptids, both YALSA Quick Picks for Reluctant Readers. Her writing has appeared in a variety of publications including Booklist, BookPage, Teen Reads, the Denver Post, the Atlanta Journal Constitution, the Washington Post, and many others. She lives in Spokane, Washington.

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Girl Meets Boy: Because There Are Two Sides to Every Story 3.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 24 reviews.
epicrat More than 1 year ago
I loved the concept of GIRL MEETS BOY, and I think these authors did a fantastic job although I wish the stories were not quite that short and went on a little longer. Whenever I try an anthology, I worry about not finding enough stories to enjoy to make it worth the effort - but each story in GIRL MEETS BOY had a special sparkle that I ate each and every one of them up (and maybe licked my fingers afterward. Okay, and then went for seconds). Not all boy-girl pairings end in the expected happily-ever-afters, and furthermore they use romance as a diving board and splashed into more headier issues that involve gender identity, internet openness, and cultural differences. Anyone who enjoys a good dual-perspective - especially when both sides have conflicting motives – will most likely enjoy the fruits of these authors’ labor.
mikitchenlady on LibraryThing 5 months ago
In Girl Meets Boy, pairs of authors write the two sides of a love story or encounter, in short story form - the boy's and the girl's. Edited by Kelly Milner Halls, a contributor of one of the stories, Girl Meets Boy is an interesting concept for a young adult work. If she feels this way, I wonder how he felt in the same situation. If this is his story, I wonder what her story was.The stories were fun and entertaining, but it just didn't feel right to me. After years of taking psychology classes, I've learned that memory is constructed and rarely photographic, so it's really unusual if two people have the same memories of a set of circumstances. And after years of relationships, I've found that often one person thinks way more about someone than the other one does. So I'm not sure this book works for me - I viewed it with a large degree of skepticism, which kept me from enjoying it. One warning to other readers - while this is a small book, it's definitely for mature readers, so watch the audience.The best pair in the bunch is the one written by James Howe ("Want to Meet") and Ellen Wittlinger ("Meeting for Real").
molliekay on LibraryThing 5 months ago
An interesting concept with intriguing pairs of authors. Each pair teamed up to write the opposing viewpoint in a story about a boy falling in love with a girl falling in love with a boy. No one has your typical romance in these short experiments, but then again, who does? Religion, race, gender, sexuality, and height all play a part. Though written by masters of their craft, these stories are not for all audiences. Older teens and adults will enjoy them the most.
renkellym on LibraryThing 5 months ago
This collection of short stories aims to show that there are two sides to every dispute or interaction between a guy and a girl. It doesn¿t quite do this¿it instead shows gives us a backstory for both the male and female protagonists of each story. It¿s kind of like books with alternating-POVs; there¿s no real revelation when you see the other side of a story, it just provides a new perspective.Now let¿s get down to the stories.Story 1: John and Wanda. This story is not the best start to the novel. John¿s POV feels messy and jumbled, but Wanda¿s is smoother and more understandable. The two characters are deeply flawed, which is interesting, but the story definitely has a skeevy vibe.Story 2: Bobby and Nancy. This one is cute! The two authors successfully capture the awkwardness of a first relationship, especially because the parties involved are so different.Story 3: Max and Alex. Stories of friendship formed over the internet always interest me, and this story was no exception. The authors do a great job making the relationship between Max and Alex feel real, and I loved how the story ultimately ended.Story 4: Sean and Raffina. Yay for multiracial couples! I love that the authors spent time exploring the weirdness that comes with dating someone of a different color. This story takes a very candid look at the situation, which is refreshing.Story 5: Rafi and Kerry. This story also examines a multiracial couple, but it examines culture in depth. It¿s neat to see similarities in cultures that are complete opposites. The romance in this one is especially cute.Story 6: Gavin and Stephanie. Hello, twist ending! The authors do a fantastic job of developing the characters in this one, and the backstories are fully fleshed out. The ending will seriously surprise you, though!
Aerrin99 on LibraryThing 5 months ago
I loved the concept of this book, but the execution leaves a lot to be desired. The stories just aren't that good. Worse, the he-said-she-said doesn't always line up in ways that make a lot of sense. It takes a really talented writer to build an entire character and story in such a short space - almost all of the stories here suffer because none of them are really up to the challenge. In a book about exploring relationships from different points of view, that's a real problem. Don't get me wrong - the book isn't terrible. It's just... not that good.
EKAnderson on LibraryThing 5 months ago
What a brilliant concept for a short story collection! In GIRL MEETS BOY, each story is accompanied by another told from the perspective of the other character in the story, and of the opposite gender.Featuring stories from some of YA's most celebrated authors as well as some newcomers, GIRL MEETS BOY is an impressive combination of literary prowess and compelling commercial storytelling. Most memorable for me is Joseph Bruchac and Cynthia Leitich Smith's "Falling Down to See the Moon" and "Mooning Over Broken Stars," respectively, two tales about kids on an Indian reservation: one, a geeky martial arts whiz, and the other a top female athlete, both fairly uncomfortable in their bodies. I also loved "Want to Meet" and "Meeting for Real," by James Howe and Ellen Wittlinger, about small town teens both struggling with small town reactions to homosexuality -- but in very different ways. Honestly, there wasn't a single story in the collection that didn't grab me and hold me tight. I highly recommend this book not only to teen readers but to adult short fiction aficionados. This would be a great title to include in classroom studies of character development and in short stories. And, of course, reluctant readers love a short story -- and I can't imagine a reader only reading one story in GIRL MEETS BOY and not wanting more. Kelly Milner Halls has put together a book that is not only refreshing and innovative, but is also a brilliant kind of addictive.
crazyhippo37 on LibraryThing 5 months ago
Girl Meets Boy was a creative idea and it occasionally worked, but some of the stories fell flat. I liked that the characters were all different and that some of the stories dealt with issues like interracial relationships and sexuality. Most of the characters were developed well and were realistic teenagers. However, some of the stories were boring in comparison to others, and not all of them struck a chord with me. Also, some of the stories were just too short to have a truly fleshed out plot or any sense of urgency within them. Overall, while the characters were interesting and some of the stories were beautifully written, not all of them were great and so this book was just okay for me.READ AN UNCORRECTED ARC
B00KAH0LIC on LibraryThing 5 months ago
12 authors. 6 double sided stories.I was expecting a cute book. It is not a cute book. Not that it does not have it's cute moments, but there strong emotions flying around. The stories are deep rather than fluffy. So, it was different from my expectations. However, the stories were great in their wonderfully thought provoking way. They were fantastic stories. The characters all felt like real people with real problems. Plus, the entire time reading the book I imagined myself writing pieces of a story along with someone else. It sounds like a blast. I really enjoyed this story about teenagers, boys and girls and their emotions. Just don't let the cover fool you. It's not fluffy.
elizardkwik on LibraryThing 5 months ago
I have to say I was a bit disappointed by this one. Great authors, great idea, less-than-great execution. Some of the stories were cute, some of them were too short (I wanted more!), and some of them were just right, but overall, the premise that there are two sides to every story was not demonstrated completely by any of these stories. Plus, some of the stories were a little bit more graphic than I expected - definitely intended for the higher "young adult" range. Loved the idea, but really, it could have been so much more. I did enjoy the multicultural aspect - nicely done.
theepicrat on LibraryThing 5 months ago
I loved the concept of GIRL MEETS BOY, and I think these authors did a fantastic job although I wish the stories were not quite that short and went on a little longer. Whenever I try an anthology, I worry about not finding enough stories to enjoy to make it worth the effort - but each story in GIRL MEETS BOY had a special sparkle that I ate each and every one of them up (and maybe licked my fingers afterward. Okay, and then went for seconds). Not all boy-girl pairings end in the expected happily-ever-afters, and furthermore they use romance as a diving board and splashed into more headier issues that involve gender identity, internet openness, and cultural differences. Anyone who enjoys a good dual-perspective - especially when both sides have conflicting motives ¿ will most likely enjoy the fruits of these authors¿ labor.
macsbrains on LibraryThing 5 months ago
This anthology was ok. Its 6 stories fit very well with the theme (that the same event or sequence of events can seem very different depending on your perspective & motivations) and I found it to be very interesting, but I wasn't entirely satisfied with it. Taken individually, all the stories were good. None were great or bad. The stories were all carefully varied so there were no two flavors that were exactly the same. The one I liked best involved a gay teen meeting up with his online chat crush. I thought it was a particularly sensitive look at the complex feelings that drive connections like that, and the myriad reasons people have for forming them. But when taken together as a whole, the collection seemed overtly didactic. Maybe if there had been more to round it out the collection would have been better.I think it's a good read for teens, and it may open some eyes, but I would be more likely to recommend individual novels with this theme than this collection.
resugo on LibraryThing 5 months ago
This wasn't what I was expecting. I thought it would be a fun, lighter read with insight into how boys and girls view the same situation. It wasn't fun or light, nor did it bring insight. It wasn't even all that enjoyable. I really didn't like the first set of stories, so it took me a while to pick the book up and read the rest. And I'm not sure it was really worth my time to have picked it back up. Looking at the book overall, it was just okay. Some stories were more enjoyable then others, but I didn't love any of them. Too much focus on sex and trying to be surprising.
foggidawn on LibraryThing 5 months ago
I received Girl Meets Boy, edited by Kelly Milner Halls, through the Early Reviewers program. This short story collection consists of several paired stories, with two celebrated YA authors each telling one side of a love story. When a collection features names like Chris Crutcher, Ellen Wittlinger, Joseph Bruchac, and Rita Williams-Garcia, my expectations run high . . . but in this case, I have to admit, I was a little disappointed. Nearly all of the stories in the book feature a high level of teenage angst, but to me, it almost seemed like too much -- it felt like they were trying too hard to be hip, edgy, and relevant. Maybe it's just the normal difficulty of cramming fully-fledged characters and a well-developed plot into the space afforded by a short story, but many of the stories felt a little rushed and disjointed to me. And, though this may sound contradictory, I don't think the book lived up to its premise, either. In the introduction, Halls describes her inspiration for the book as a story of a teenage couple's breakup, in which one person's action was seen completely differently by the two halves of the couple. While I wasn't expecting all of these stories to be breakup tales, it seemed like the protagonists in many of the stories were pretty much on the same page -- there was not a lot of dramatic tension created by miscommunication or characters misjudging each others' motives.Other reviewers seem to have enjoyed this book much more than I did, so perhaps it's just that I wasn't in the mood for teenage angst . . . but, all in all, this is a book that I can't see myself recommending.
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I love this book its so awsome
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Some cute stories that were ok.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Woof woof.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If there is then Im not aloud to read it.