Head First EJB: Passing the Sun Certified Business Component Developer Exam

Head First EJB: Passing the Sun Certified Business Component Developer Exam

by Kathy Sierra, Bert Bates
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Head First EJB: Passing the Sun Certified Business Component Developer Exam 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Head First has an outstanding way of making things simple for its readers through diagrams and dialouges. They know how deep to go into a topic. However, I am eagerly waiting on an updated version of the book that would cover EJB 3.0 SUN exam. SUN has phased out EJB 2.0. I believe updated version of Head First for EJB 3.0 exam is on the way.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Sierra and Bates are making quite a splash with these books. They wrote an earlier book (Head First Java) where they used a very informal cartoon-heavy teaching method. Now they have produced this book on Enterprise Java Beans. I have been reading about EJBs since they first came out, but I never knew there was anything funny about them. Just ignorant, I guess! Certainly their graphic narratives help illuminate what some might consider a bone-dry subject. But their lengthy explanations with diagrams may be more instructive for you than the standard EJB texts. The thing is, EJB usage is inherently more abstract than just learning java, where, for example, GUI coding gives you immediate visual feedback. With EJBs, and transactions and hooking up to a database [etc], there are usually no visuals (apart from the command line). So a diagrammatic pedagogy is correspondingly more valuable for understanding, because these diagrams may well be your ONLY visuals. Maybe you are new to EJBs and have a standard text. But for you, its explanations are too cursory? And it did not have any exercises? If so, try temporarily scaling back and using this book. It may put you on a firmer conceptual footing, and then you can return to a more 'mainstream' book.