How to Build a Business Rules Engine: Extending Application Functionality through Metadata Engineering

How to Build a Business Rules Engine: Extending Application Functionality through Metadata Engineering

by Malcolm Chisholm, Ronald G. Ross
5.0 1
ISBN-10:
1558609180
ISBN-13:
9781558609181
Pub. Date:
01/01/2004
Publisher:
Elsevier Science

Paperback - Rent for

Select a Purchase Option
  • purchase options
    $66.42 $86.95 Save 24% Current price is $66.42, Original price is $86.95. You Save 24%.
  • purchase options

Overview

How to Build a Business Rules Engine: Extending Application Functionality through Metadata Engineering

· This is the only book that demonstrates how to develop a business rules engine. Covers user requirements, data modeling, metadata, and more.
· A sample application is used throughout the book to illustrate concepts. The code for the sample application is available online at http://www.refdataportal.com.
· Includes conceptual overview chapters suitable for management-level readers, including general introduction, business justification, development and implementation considerations, and more.

· This is the only book that demonstrates how to develop a business rules engine. Covers user requirements, data modeling, metadata, and more.
· A sample application is used throughout the book to illustrate concepts. The code for the sample application is available online at http://www.refdataportal.com.
· Includes conceptual overview chapters suitable for management-level readers, including general introduction, business justification, development and implementation considerations, and more.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781558609181
Publisher: Elsevier Science
Publication date: 01/01/2004
Series: Morgan Kaufmann Series in Data Management Systems Series
Pages: 512
Product dimensions: 1.03(w) x 7.50(h) x 9.25(d)

Table of Contents

What Are Business Rules and Business Rules Engines. Why Build a Business Rules Engine. Data Modeling and Database Design. Who Defines Business Rules and When Do They Do It. The Atomicity of Business Rules. The "Black Box" Problem. The Components of a Business Rules Engine. Populating Table Data in the Repository. Populating Column Data in the Repository. Populating Relationship and Subtype Data in the Repository. Populating Reference Data in the Repository. Defining Business Processes and Related Information. Extending the Database. Managing the Database. Implementing a Simple Business Rule. More Edit Validation Rules, Rule Components, and Rule Versions. Rule Types for Checking Referential Integrity. Working with Batch Processes: Setting Indicators and Reference Data Code Values. Implementing Rule Types Using Relationships and Subtipes. Rules with Subtypes and Business Metadata. Debugging in Business Rules Engines. Managing the Business Rules Engine. Appendix A: Using the Sample Application.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

How to Build a Business Rules Engine: Extending Application Functionality through Metadata Engineering 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is very advanced. The example database was in MS Access (MSACCESS)  The book goes into the level of detail for a large enterprise application with a development team. However, it inspired me to take a minimal approach rather than create all of the details described. It was very useful for that. The first level used MS Access with MS SQL Server to evaluate a Regulatory DB used for Oil/Gas industry. It was complex due to the tracking of permits, leases, right-of-way, surveying, GIS, EPA, and other requirements that are dependent on each other.  To add to the complexity, there are multiple government agencies involved that also affect the current status and requirements. The Subject Matter Experts (SME) typically have specif terms and point-of-views. It enabled me to create a 1st version that added automation and efficiency. The Quality Assurance and Work-Flow-Tasking were great byproducts.  The second version took the working model and allowed a user-defined rule creation / management maintenance. MSAccess is a great rapid prototype tool to gather specification by example. As the author indicates, the end product should probably be done in C# or other tools. Overall, it was a great concept book to create parts needed for a specific application. Any database that has less than say 100 end users might consider MS Access as a rapid prototype tool to obtain the rules from SME. Larger operations such as a just in time assembly line will have a team of experts with specialized tools.