How to Build a Dinosaur: The New Science of Reverse Evolution

How to Build a Dinosaur: The New Science of Reverse Evolution

by Jack Horner, James Gorman
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Overview

How to Build a Dinosaur: The New Science of Reverse Evolution by Jack Horner, James Gorman

A world-renowned paleontologist reveals groundbreaking science that trumps science fiction: how to grow a living dinosaur

Over a decade after Jurassic Park, Jack Horner and his colleagues in molecular biology labs are in the process of building the technology to create a real dinosaur.

Based on new research in evolutionary developmental biology on how a few select cells grow to create arms, legs, eyes, and brains that function together, Jack Horner takes the science a step further in a plan to "reverse evolution" and reveals the awesome, even frightening, power being acquired to recreate the prehistoric past. The key is the dinosaur's genetic code that lives on in modern birds- even chickens. From cutting-edge biology labs to field digs underneath the Montana sun, How to Build a Dinosaur explains and enlightens an awesome new science.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781101028711
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 03/19/2009
Sold by: Penguin Group
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 256
Sales rank: 644,951
File size: 512 KB
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

John “Jack” Horner is one of the world’s foremost paleontologists, credited with finding the first dinosaur eggs in the Western Hemisphere, the first evidence of dinosaur colonial nesting, the first evidence of parental care among dinosaurs, and the first dinosaur embryos. He served as the inspiration for Paleontologist Dr. Alan Grant in Michael Crichton’s Jurassic Park, and as the technical advisor on all of the Jurassic Park films. Horner is Curator of Paleontology at the Museum of the Rockies in Bozeman, Montana, and Regents Professor of Paleontology at Montana State University.

James Gorman is deputy science editor of the New York Times and editor of its Science Times section.

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How to Build a Dinosaur: Extinction Doesn't Have to Be Forever 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 18 reviews.
AnnBKeller More than 1 year ago
Renowned paleontologist, Jack Horner, and James Gorman, deputy science editor of The New York Times, have written a profound book in How to Build A Dinosaur. Rather than zeroing in on ancient dinosaur DNA, Horner and his colleagues instead focus on evolutionary development, or "evo-devo", as they term it. We know that the embryos of multiple creatures develop in a similar fashion, for a time featuring arm and beg buds as well as tails. Assuming that dinosaurs evolved in a similar manner, Jack Horner contends that it might be possible to reverse evolution from the embryo of a modern chicken. Such a massive step is controversial to be sure, but the benefits of manipulating genes at just the right point in development might very well assist us in resolving spinal chord problems and other birth defects in humans today. Jack Horner cites to some of the great fossil discoveries of the past, as well as current research involving exploration of past life forms on a molecular level. This book is an excellent bridge between paleontology and cutting edge technology. How to Build A Dinosaur is the marriage of two types of investigations in our continual search for the answers to the questions of evolution, selection and the tantalizing prospect of some day generating a living, breathing dinosaur. Perhaps, in the process, we can learn a little more about our own development and our place in this ever changing world.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A fantastic read, I would most certainly recommend it to anyone who is interested in biology, paleontology, evolution, or good science in general. I cannot wait to see what comes of the research mentioned here.
scienceguyMT More than 1 year ago
This was a great read I enjoyed it. The idea behind the book is amazing and would be truely interesting if a dinosaur was ever truely recreated
Bookworm2440 More than 1 year ago
This book was very interesting, and taught me a lot of facts, but it didn't always stay on the main subject. This book tended to stray of track A LOT. And also, they don't even tell you the steps that they will use. It just moves on from describing one bodypart to another. But still, it taught me a lot more about dinosaurs than I ever knew.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It is palaintolgetic
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Epic
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Aaaaaaaaaaaawwwwwwwwssssssssoooooooommmmmmmeeeeeee full of action
Kelly Caudillo More than 1 year ago
Intruiging, engrossing. Made me want to buy it. Maybe they could lower the price? Awesome book though. Enjoy