Hungry Planet: What the World Eats

Hungry Planet: What the World Eats

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780984074426
Publisher: Penguin Random House
Publication date: 09/01/2007
Pages: 288
Sales rank: 189,046
Product dimensions: 8.60(w) x 11.90(h) x 0.90(d)

About the Author

PETER MENZEL and FAITH D'ALUISIO are the co-creators of the books Material World: A Global Family Portrait and Women in the Material World. They are also the co-authors of Man Eating Bugs and Robo sapiens: Evolution of a New Species. They live in Napa, California, and are the parents of Josh, Jack, Adam, and Evan.


PETER MENZEL and FAITH D'ALUISIO are the co-creators of the books Material World: A Global Family Portrait and Women in the Material World. They are also the co-authors of Man Eating Bugs and Robo sapiens: Evolution of a New Species. They live in Napa, California, and are the parents of Josh, Jack, Adam, and Evan.

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Hungry Planet: What the World Eats 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 15 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Every American should know the facts presented in this book. We should appreciate what we have more, eat less, buy more organic and free-range and cook at home. If you don't already feel this way, you and everyone who reads this book will once they're through. I envision a dinner guest leafing through the photos, skeptically pausing to read a caption, recipe or statistic and having a lightbulb moment. You can read this book in snippets, or whole and digest so much knowledge. By owning it you will have access to amazing international family recipes some of the ingredients you already have and some you can have fun looking for and requesting from your local grocer. Make cooking and eating fun and wholesome again. A family afair. So many of these families get what Americans long forgot.
cinesnail88 on LibraryThing 8 months ago
I had heard about this photo-essay book a little while ago and was interested enough that I decided to buy it. It basically covers a lot of families in countries all over the world and what they eat in a week, how much it costs, etc.If you live in a first-world country, this book can be incredibly eye-opening. Seeing the sheer amount of soda, fast food, and prepackaged foods an average family in Great Britain, France, the US, Germany, or Australia consumes certainly made me consider a lot about diet. Also, the sad fact that the family whose food costs the least per week (about $1.50 a week) in Darfur is completely separated (in all ways - food choice, food amount, modes of preparation) from the family whose food costs the most per week (about $500) in Germany.I'm probably not explaining it well, but this book not only has beautiful photos of every family with the food they eat in a week, but also contains illuminating essays and commentary, making it a truly wonderful book that I was more than willing to read cover to cover. Highly recommended.
SelimaCat on LibraryThing 8 months ago
This book is full of beautiful, intricate photographs of families from across the world in their kitchens with a week's worth of food spread around them. Each family is accompanied by a narrative essay, photos of their markets and grocery stores, a detailed list of every item in the photo with accompanying costs, and facts about their country. Totally fascinating, but slow going as there is much to look at and think about. I guarantee you'll be depressed at all the great bread the rest of the world (even by much poorer families) is eating compared to the limp, squooshy stuff on your countertop. A *great* read.
readasaurus on LibraryThing 8 months ago
Quite possibly my favorite book. Menzel captures the eating habits of statistically average families from countries around the world by taking photos of what the families eat for one week. He puts ALL the food on a table in front of the family, which makes for stunning photography. Menzel shows us the world's people and the world's problems by showing us the world's food. We see the starving refugees in Chad, surviving of UN ground mush. We see the American diet filled with pizza and soda. We see two families from China and the differences between urban and suburban life, reflecting globalization. This book could be used across the curriculum--in Math, children can compare statistics of diabetes or calorie consumption. In Social Studies, children can learn about the lifestyles of different countries. Hungry Planet can be used to discuss current events or to learn about making inferences in English class. This would be an ideal book for a Health or Nutrition class. When used in a sixth grade classroom, my students felt great appreciation for what they had to eat and became activists in the fight to end global hunger. This is an amazing teaching tool that can be used for middle school-college classrooms.
AnnieHidalgo on LibraryThing 8 months ago
This book is so interesting. Its basic premise is that the author traveled to many, many countries, stayed with a family he felt to be typical of the culture, ate with them and watched them shop, then photographed absolutely every ingredient they would use for an entire week, with a complete catalogue of these foods on the page facing. It's a fascinating look into other cultures - how similar they can be, and how different, from your own. There's another neat one, also by Peter Menzel, called Material World, where he did a similar thing, a photographic catalogue of a family's life. But the photography in this one is better. In MW, the pictures are taken from so far away that it is slightly difficult to see detail, and that detail, for me, was what made this one so interesting, like being able to momentarily step into another country and browse someone else's life. Like traveling, without the expense of airfare - you really feel like you know a place when you know what they eat.
Stbalbach on LibraryThing 8 months ago
Thirty families in twenty-four countries spread a weeks worth of food on a table and pose for a picture, followed by a few pages about the family and their shopping and eating habits, sort of like a National Geographic article with one article (chapter) per family. It includes very specific shopping lists of every food item, family recipes and pictures of the family in their daily lives, usually involved with cooking or shopping. The authors of the book are Californian organic eaters so they are sensitive to the health aspects, in particular noting fast food purchases and per-country obesity rates.
datwood on LibraryThing 8 months ago
Menzel has traveled the world, picking a family to represent a country. He then photographed the family at their home with a week's supply of food. Accompanying essays show how even in the most remote areas, homonization in food-stuff is taking place. Candy, American fast food, and non-essentials are showing up all over. It is a sobering reflection of the wealth of food available in parts of the world.
annarama on LibraryThing 8 months ago
A great picture book! Lots of factoids and statistics about food consumption around the world.
iBeth on LibraryThing 8 months ago
eye opening, with gorgeous photos and interesting commentary.
keatkin on LibraryThing 8 months ago
This is a fascinating study of eating habits and diets all over the world.
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