Island of the Lost: Shipwrecked at the Edge of the World

Island of the Lost: Shipwrecked at the Edge of the World

by Joan Druett
3.7 11

Paperback

$24.95
View All Available Formats & Editions
Eligible for FREE SHIPPING
  • Get it by Monday, August 28 ,  Order by 12:00 PM Eastern and choose Expedited Delivery during checkout.

Overview

Island of the Lost: Shipwrecked at the Edge of the World by Joan Druett

Auckland Island is a godforsaken place in the middle of the Southern Ocean, 285 miles south of New Zealand. With year-round freezing rain and howling winds, it is one of the most forbidding places in the world. To be shipwrecked there means almost certain death.

In 1864 Captain Thomas Musgrave and his crew of four aboard the schooner Grafton wreck on the southern end of the island. Utterly alone in a dense coastal forest, plagued by stinging blowflies and relentless rain, Captain Musgrave—rather than succumb to this dismal fate—inspires his men to take action. With barely more than their bare hands, they build a cabin and, remarkably, a forge, where they manufacture their tools. Under Musgrave's leadership, they band together and remain civilized through even the darkest and most terrifying days.

Incredibly, at the same time on the opposite end of the island—twenty miles of impassable cliffs and chasms away—the Invercauld wrecks during a horrible storm. Nineteen men stagger ashore. Unlike Captain Musgrave, the captain of the Invercauld falls apart given the same dismal circumstances. His men fight and split up; some die of starvation, others turn to cannibalism. Only three survive. Musgrave and all of his men not only endure for nearly two years, they also plan their own astonishing escape, setting off on one of the most courageous sea voyages in history.

Using the survivors' journals and historical records, award-winning maritime historian Joan Druett brings this extraordinary untold story to life, a story about leadership and the fine line between order and chaos.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781565124080
Publisher: Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill
Publication date: 06/08/2007
Pages: 304
Sales rank: 208,683
Product dimensions: 5.60(w) x 8.76(h) x 1.11(d)

About the Author

Native New Zealander JOAN DRUETT is the author of eleven books on maritime history and historical fiction. She has been the recipient of a PEN/Hubert Church Award, a Fulbright Fellowship, and the John Lyman Award for Best Book of American Maritime History. She was a consultant for the award-winning "Seafaring Women" exhibition and has appeared as a guest speaker at maritime museums across the country. While much of her research is carried out in the United States, she lives in Wellington, New Zealand, with her husband, Ron.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Island of the Lost: Shipwrecked at the Edge of the World 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
ChadAaronSayban More than 1 year ago
"Hundreds of miles from civilization, two ships wreck on opposite ends of the same deserted island in this true story of human nature at its best - and its worst. Auckland Island is a godforsaken place in the middle of the Southern Ocean, 285 miles south of New Zealand. With year-round freezing rain and howling winds, it is one of the most forbidding places in the world. To be shipwrecked there means almost certain death." -Island of the Lost So begins Joan Druett's book, Island of the Lost - Shipwrecked at the Edge of the World. It is a tale that would seem implausible, if not for the fact that it is all absolutely true. In 1864, near the end of the age of sail, two separate ships did indeed wreck along the coast of Auckland Island - a tiny sliver of land sticking out of the forbidding Southern Ocean - a place that remains uninhabited to this day. By piecing together logbooks, memoirs, newspaper accounts and Druett's own personal trips to the desolate island, she is able to create a vivid account of two divergent stories of survival. The schooner Grafton and its crew of five wrecks at the southern end of the island. Through inspired leadership and the camaraderie of the whole crew, they are able to eke out an existence in spite of the vast hardships. At almost the same time, the Invercauld wrecks at the north end of the island. In contrast to the Grafton, most of the 19 surviving crew of the Invercauld quickly succumb to the elements, infighting and a leadership vacuum. Druett does an excellent job of weaving the two stories together, contrasting a crew working together with a crew in shambles. Her credentials as a historian insure an exhaustive level of research, while her award-winning skills as a novelist ensure that the text is entirely readable. The story moves along nicely and never fails to give the reader a sense of just how precarious the castaways' plight is. While the book spends perhaps a little too much time describing the multitude of ways to kill a seal and not quite enough time discussing the lives of the castaways after their ordeal, as a whole it is a wonderful effort at delivering a look into a place and time not widely understood. There is also a thorough collection of notes at the end that provide many more factual details. However, its greatest attribute is the way it shines a spotlight on a teachable moment of history - how survival is often determinant on who you are with and how well you work together. If you have any interest in sailing history or stories of survival in the remote reaches of the world, this is a great book to have.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This non-fiction book, Island of the Lost, written by Joan Druett shows the extreme measures of diversity in sudden tragedy. It is a great read for the journey to survival. In 1864 two crews and their ships were shipwrecked on one of the cold and treacherous Auckland Islands. Having been stranded on the opposite sides of the island, neither crew knew each other were there. Druett does an outstanding job of separating the ideas of two very different crews and how they interact with each other. On their journey to find the scarce Sea lions killed and skinned for their coats and oil, Captain Musgrave and his crew of four found the jackpot. In their excitement they would have never guessed they would be castaways in the near future. In a hurry to get back to Sydney for more crew and supplies, the ship, the Grafton, had been anchored in a position that worried the captain. Because of a tide and nearby storm the crew found themselves scrambling for theirs goods and swimming to shore. The next crew to become castaways was sailing in the ship called Invercaul, which was lead by Captain George Dalgarno. Coming from Melbourne, the group of twenty-five was headed to South America. Just about three hundred miles from New Zealand, they knew they were close to the Auckland Islands however, they didn¿t know just how close they were. With rainy, windy weather the crew shouted, ¿Land O,¿¿ just in time for the ship to be caught in what was later known as the ¿Jaws of Hell,¿ one of the most dangerous coasts in the world. Only nineteen survive to make it to shore, but how long can they last stranded on an icy, unbearable island? For almost two very long years, these separated crews fight for their lives. The diversity is clearly shown between the two captains as they are tested with their true leadership, and ability to keep their men alive. Although he appears to be a descent captain on board, Dalgarno¿s integrity and patients are truly tested with his crew on Auckland Island. On his side of the Island situations weren¿t as simple as they were with Captain Musgrave. Captain Dalgarno and his nineteen men did not have an unproblematic way of finding shelter and having peace with each other. Although they found a deserted village their attempts of recreating a functional society failed almost instantly. Circumstances became so out of control men began to die, and it even lead to cannibalism, leaving only three out of nineteen men. With Captain Musgrave and his five men, however, conditions ran smoothly as the men worked hard to build a cabin and manufacture their own tools. Eventually they found and created enough supplies to build a vessel in which all five men returned home. Obviously the two captains handled situations differently under the terrifying circumstances. Also the fact that Captain Dalgarno had a crew of nineteen and Captain Musgrave only had five men might have an impact on the way this state of affairs ended. With more men there is more of a chance for opinions and personalities to clash. When there are only five men involved, I assume it would much easier to have a civilized relationship between those men. Druett did a wonderful job of describing the difference between these two leaders and their crew. I highly recommend this book for a good read. It is an intelligent and exciting book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago